Eric King's Web Site

Here are the corrections to all the editions of A Collector's Guide to Psychedelic Rock Concert Posters, Postcards and Handbills 1965-1973 by Eric King. Many of these corrections only apply to earlier editions and have been corrected in more recent editions, but some have been added recently. Anyone using any edition of my Guide should look here for the latest updates before taking action based on the information in the Guide. This is not an extremely changeable scholarship, but new information emerges fairly often, and now that I am managing this site myself, I will attempt to see to it that the collectors and dealers who use my Guide have information which is as up to date as possible.

Last updated July 6, 2014

All corrections are on this page; click the appropriate link below for quick access to individual sections.

Family Dog corrections

Bill Graham corrections

Batman essay corrections

Graham tickets corrections

Gibb/Grande corrections

Neon Rose corrections

If you have questions or information that might be useful in keeping my guide up-to-date, I may be reached at therose7@earthlink.net.

Return to Eric King's Main Page.

After the copyrights page add:
PUBLICATION HISTORY OF THIS GUIDE

It has been brought to my attention that there are collectors who are interested in the publication history of this Guide. The following should enable them to determine what edition(s) they have and when they were published.

The First Edition A was published in 1980 by Vogue Press in an edition of 100 copies. It is 121 pages long.

Between 1984 and 1993 the Guide was published in about four separate editions B, C, D, and E.
These are 149 pages long and vary only slightly. These editions were 150 copies each.

The Second Edition  was published in 1996. “c 1996 SVAHA PRESS” appears at the bottom of the third page. It is 457 pages long. This is the first illustrated edition. This edition was 150 copies.

The Third Edition was published in 1999. It is 642 pages long. This edition was 150 copies.

The Fourth Edition was published in 2001. It is 646 pages long. This edition was 150 copies.

The Fifth Edition was published in 2003. It is 655 pages long. This edition was 150 copies.

The Sixth Edition was published in 2004. A small “6” appears in the lower right corner of the front page cover. It is 664 pages long. This edition was 150 copies.

The Seventh Edition was published in 2006. A small “7” appears in the lower right corner of the front page cover. It is 681 pages long. This edition was 150 copies.

The Eighth Edition was published in 2008. A small “8” appears in the lower right corner of the front page cover. It is 698 pages long. This edition was 150 copies.

The Ninth Edition was published in 2009. A small “9” appears in the lower right corner of the front page cover. It is 797 pages long. This edition was 150 copies.

Under acknowledgments add:

Under PLAGUES add:
As if this is not enough to keep poster collectors confused, yet another problem deserves mention. Many of the paper stocks on which these posters were printed have two noticeably different sides, and due to the fact that the printers mistakenly did not think of these posters as great art for the ages, they occasionally managed to run a few sheets through the press so that they were printed on the wrong side. Although most collectors will go through a lifetime of collecting without encountering such an error, it is worth noting that these exist. I have generally not listed such variants when I know of only one or two copies, but when more than that are known to exist and the likelihood of being confronted with one is substantially increased, the variant  will be enumerated and described under a specific number.
 

Before the Family Dog section add:

Response to Phil Cushway

In July of 2001 Mr. Phil Cushway, owner of Artrock, made a number of complaints about this guide as part of a brief essay posted on eBay along
with eBay item 1446507650, a copy of

FD-66-RP-2. In order to do justice to Mr. Cushway's criticisms I will quote them in their entirety exactly as they appeared:

"In general I hesitate getting at all involved in the designation of what is, or is not a first printing. In many cases it is possible to distinguish with relative certainty, that there were two printings and what contra-distinguishes them apart. In many cases, however, this is not possible. The primary text used for this purpose, Eric King's "collector's guide" changes over the years with some posters that are "only printed once" in one edition, now has different printings; posters thought to be second printings are now considered to be the reverse; posters with several printings before are now considered to be part of a single-edition; newly discovered. The recent (within the last year) discovery of "small dots" or "small lines" is now thought to separate "printings". I try to rest my reasoning on the following premises: 1) That I was not present at the printer at the actual time of printing and therefore can never say for certain without a lot of proof that these were in fact multiple printings and how to tell the difference. 2) That professional printers who would do things in the most reasonable and simplistic manner primarily printed these posters. 3) That in general, what was the most likeliest, and simplistic explanation is what probably happened. 4) We should not try to read something too complicated into what is a very straightforward process."

Mr. Cushway has raised a number of issues which merit a careful, well-reasoned response. The most important point that should be made is that most of the criticisms Mr. Cushway makes relate to changes between my earliest guide to this material, the first edition, which I wrote in 1978 and 1979, and the expanded, illustrated third edition which I wrote in 1995. In the earliest edition I disregarded the subtle differences between many of the printings of Family Dog posters from FD-43 to FD-86. In 1978 I felt that since the Family Dog had chosen to designate each of these printings as "-1" even though some had been printed weeks and even months after the concerts, I should accept the decision of the copyright holder to make such a designation. It is important to note that at that time these specific Family Dog posters sold for a maximum of $5.00 each, and, like almost everyone else, I never anticipated that they would have the values they currently do.

The main reason that I wrote the original guide is that reprints of early Bill Graham posters were being sold by people claiming they were originals. Here there was a genuine difference in value. And original BG-8 might have been worth $20 while a reprint was worth only $3.00, and
there was every reason to believe early originals would continue to increase in value if collectors felt confident about what they were buying. No such problem existed with Family Dog posters from No. 1 to No. 41 because these were almost all clearly marked. In 1978 although I was aware of the problem with the undesignated reprinting of Family Dog posters from No. 43 to No. 86, I chose to ignore it. I have apologized for this poor scholarship repeatedly, and I do so again here. My earlier guide was inadequate in this regard, and I have regularly given buyers of that guide a substantial discount on the purchase of the newer ones, but it is important to repeat that quite a few of these distinctions were not only very subtle and difficult to describe, they were also on items which had what was essentially the same value, $5.00 in mint condition. The notion of devoting an additional several hundred hours to the writing of the 1978 guide in order to distinguish this material under these circumstances seemed excessive to say the least. Almost all the changes Mr. Cushway refers to fall into this specific area where the 1978 guide listed Family Dog posters from No. 43 to No. 86 as printed once when in fact there were multiple printings which I listed correctly in 1995.

Today this material is tens and often hundreds of times more valuable, collected by multitudes all around the world, recognized by major art historians as the most important graphic art in the 20th Century and bought mainly as decor. It is hard for people to understand that in the late
1970s this material was collected only by a few dozen serious collectors and at most a few hundred casual ones almost all of whom lived in the San Francisco Bay area. These were collectors seeking complete sets to put into albums. They were interested in what mainstream Americans in general and the San Francisco art establishment in particular viewed as "the drug crazed ravings of filthy, sex obsessed hippies." (This is a direct quote made to me in the early 1970’s by a high ranking official of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art whom I shall not embarrass by naming.) By 1990 it became clear that a new edition of the guide was necessary, one which reflected the fact that there were clear distinctions between the various printings of most of the Family Dog posters between No. 43 and No. 86 as well as several Bill Graham posters not noted in my earlier guide. Unfortunately I was unable to work on this revision until 1995. By this time the enormous jump in values necessitated a very precise, thorough and professional guide which I believe I have made available since 1996.

As for more specific criticisms I note the following: there are only two cases where posters designated originals and posters designated reprints have been reversed. One is the "Batman," BG-2, about which I have written a lengthy essay concerning what is almost certainly the worst
scholarly mistake made not only by me but agreed upon by all the early collectors of this material. The other is FD-44 which was the result of an error by my typist which I failed to catch in the proofreading process to the expanded and illustrated 1996 edition which was the first edition entered into a computer. The failure to catch this reversal was entirely my fault, but it does not represent an error in scholarship. I knew all along which was the correct original. It was properly identified in my handwritten manuscript which I gave to my typist.

The case of the poster which previously had been listed with multiple printings which I changed to one printing in 2000 is FD-68. It seems unfair to me for Mr. Cushway to complain about this since he is the one who pointed out that the evidence of multiple printings was incorrect. He
presented conclusive proof that the guide was incorrect, and I changed it to reflect the new data. I note that although there is not a lot of similar information which will alter the guide substantially that is likely to emerge following the decade from 1990 to 2000 during which a great deal of the research was done both by myself and by Jacaeber Kastor of Psychedelic Solution, this continues to be a fluid scholarship. Some new material or evidence is discovered almost monthly, and it would be irresponsible for me not to share this with those who use my guide. That is why I maintain my web site, so collectors can access the latest information as it becomes available. While it is not possible for me or anyone else to guarantee absolutely that this or that item will not change, the level of precision now has reached the point where it is extremely unlikely there will be many such changes. Perhaps the best demonstration of this is that there are only about half a dozen serious differences between my guide
and Mr. Kastor's catalogue which is the result of research almost completely independent from my own. We share our results, but we work separately. If we have arrived at this many identical conclusions, it seems reasonable for the collecting public to rely on the notion that there are
not many mistakes in our two works on this topic.

Another related topic which ought to be addressed is the claim by some parties that Mr. Kastor and I differ greatly on many items. This is just not so and is very possibly the work of people who wish to discredit both of us so they can sell reprints which they claim are originals. The main
differences between Mr. Kastor's catalogue and my guide involve either style or areas of interest. The styles are very different because his is a catalogue of items or sale. He runs a business, and quite reasonably he wishes to sell his wares. Information he gives about printing variations is
only one part of what he seeks to present to his customers. In my guide it is the main information that I wish to present to my readers. Carefully read these two documents rarely state anything mutually exclusive. As for different areas of interest, I seem to have a fascination with things like the fact that a number of early Bill Graham cards which were printed three cards vertically alongside one poster have differences among the three cards, top, middle and bottom (This is other than split fountain differences such as BG-53.). I have laboriously outlined these differences which really would have no utility in a catalogue of items for sale. Mr. Kastor chooses to lump them together. He is well aware of these differences, does not dispute them and even pointed one of them out to me. He seems to have an interest in subtle differences in paper stocks, especially in differences between stocks from the same printing which when viewed obliquely on the reverse under good lighting have either a random texture or a texture which he describes as "rows." My attitude is that since these are from the same printing, I would prefer to lump them together. I am fully aware of these distinctions and do not dispute their existence.

The last of Mr. Cushway's objections that I wish to address is based on his apparent belief that I use small dots or lines as proof of the existence of different printings because I use them as traits distinguishing printings. Actually in these cases I usually have already proved to my own
satisfaction that there are different printings, and I am merely looking for the clearest and simplest distinctions between them which can be verbally described. These are often small dots or lines which appear on all copies of one printing and no copies of another. So that collectors can understand how this process works, the following is a description of the evidence on two different posters, BG- 205 and FD-49, and how they came to be described as having two printings when previously only one had been listed. I will also cite one case, FD-75, where as yet no such evidence exists but which I list as having two printings anyway, and I will say something about why I do so.

For a number of years beginning in the mid-1980s I had suspected there might be two printings of BG-205. The reason for this was that I had noticed there were two variants which were reliably separable by color. Although the differences were subtle, they were consistent, and I saw no transitional copies, copies partway between the two in color which would indicate one run during which the ink was changed, a common occurrence with early Bill Graham posters. Furthermore the cards seemed to match one variant of the poster, but the cards were not printed on the same sheets at this stage of psychedelic history. While interesting, this was not adequate evidence to warrant my changing the guide to indicate two printings, especially since it was not one of the six unmarked 1975 reprints and no copies of BG-205 bore the script "W" which at
the time was thought to mark all post 1975 Bill Graham reprints (I note in passing that after BGP reprinted the six posters Nos. 170, 188, 210, 211, 214 and 216 in 1975, I wrote a letter to Bill Graham very politely suggesting his attorneys check California law regarding reprinting of
posters. I mentioned that the law prohibited selling reprinted posters without designating them as reprints. I never received a response, but afterwards the reprints bore this script "W."). I simply waited to see if further evidence would appear.

In 2000 Michael Bradford, a part-time poster dealer in North Carolina who knew I was interested in this image e-mailed me that he had acquired a very interesting item, a proof sheet of two posters, a BG-205 with no script "W" and a BG-140 with a script "W." It was on glossy, coated stock similar to that used for Bill Graham originals from No. 150 to No. 286. This was clear evidence of a BG-205 reprint, and I asked him to send it to me so I could study it. When it arrived, I pulled out six copies of BG-205 I had saved, three from one group, three from the other. The proof sheet clearly matched one group, so that group was definitely the reprint, but although the colors of the two groups were different, the differences were
very subtle, and it was not possible to describe these differences verbally. Furthermore since few collectors nowadays were likely to have copies of both variants, it would not have been possible (as it was in the 1970s when there were few collectors most of whom had most known variants)
to say "hold your two copies side-by-side and look for the one with the darker magenta..." I had to find some mark that appeared on all of one edition and none of the other.

I noticed that on three copies there was a small black line on the right edge of the poster midway between the top and bottom. Having seen this sort of mark on posters on several previous occasions, I recognized this as a remnant of a printer’s bull's-eye which had been placed too close to the image and could not have been completely removed in trimming without creating an unattractively narrow border (A printer’s bull's-eye is a circle with two crosshairs through it, one vertical, one horizontal. Usually there are four on an uncut sheet, usually center top and bottom and center left and right sides. They are used to realign the press exactly between the different runs with the various plates so that colors are printed in exactly correct registration. These are usually trimmed off after the printing process is complete.).

I saw that the BG-205 on the reprint sheet was on the viewer’s left so the right border of the
BG-205 was in the middle of the sheet between the two images. That meant there could he no copies of the reprints with the black line in the right margin because there could not be a printer’s bull's-eye at the center of the sheet. There would have been no room for it. It could only be there on the original, and it was extremely unlikely any originals existed which had been trimmed so far in as to eliminate this black line entirely because this would have created a drastically unbalanced poster.

I then changed the guide to include this new information. I note that the small line was not used as "proof" of two printings, only as the distinguishing characteristic, and that there was substantial and convincing evidence beyond the existence of the small line that there were two
printings. I did not describe the evidence because if I attempted to give the reader all the evidence on every image, the guide with the four or five times its current size.

The case of FD-49 is similar but not identical. With Family Dog items the printing records for the numbers from 43 to 86 exist in the form of the carbon copies of the billing from California Litho Plate to the Family Dog. In general these do not show by number which items were reprinted.
They simply read "reprints 5M," but there are enough such receipts from week to week that it is obvious almost all of these numbers were reprinted. Furthermore proof sheets of both originals and reprints exist in most cases. Original proof sheets are readily distinguished from
reprints by the presence of cards. An employee of California Litho Plate has confirmed the long held belief that cards were never reprinted with Family Dog posters. As with BG- 205 it was clear that there were two groups of posters, one a range of darker blues which match the cards and
one a lighter blue which did not. Again I set aside several copies from each group and awaited further evidence. It was suspected that the darker was the original and the lighter the reprint, but this was not certain.

Jacaeber Kastor then did the same thing, stored away a few copies of each, and one night when he had some time to spare he spread out on the floor a selection of both groups and spent several hours looking at them. Eventually he noticed that on all the light blue copies there was a
small, faint horizontal line in the lower margin. This was clearly a mark which was on the printing plate, not a mark made, for example, by piece of dirt which had gotten on the plate during the printing process, had moved around and eventually had been removed by the printer during the course of the printing. While this did not seal the case, it certainly gave credence to the idea that two different plates printed these two groups of posters. Since it was extremely unlikely two plates were made to print the original and there were no light blue cards, he decided this meant there were two printings and listed them as such in his catalog. As a dealer he had access to a substantial number of additional copies which to check, and he also contacted other collectors and dealers to check their copies. All confirmed his thesis. I agreed with the results of his research and changed the guide accordingly. That would have been an adequate end of the story, but several months later two other things surfaced. One was the original artwork which did not have the small line, and the other was a printer's proof sheet of the reprint of FD-49 printed alongside FD-59. On this sheet FD-49 clearly had the small line. As an astute reader can see, the existence of this small line is far from the only proof that there are two printings. It is only one part of a carefully reasoned argument in favor of there being two printings. It is the only one mentioned in my guide and in Mr. Kastor's catalog because it is the easiest means of distinguishing between the two printings, not because it is the sole proof there are two printings which it obviously is not.

The case for two printings of FD-75 tends to rest on the evidence of other images as much is on evidence of FD-75 itself. Here there are two distinct groups separable by color. Unlike FD-49 where the two groups were not noticed until after the close of the Avalon Ballroom, the second
variation was recognized when it appeared in posters shops while the concert series was still running. The lighter blue was very noticeable in contrast to the blue of the original. Therefore it was possible for me to inquire among the early collectors to see if anyone had seen a lighter copy
around the time of the FD-75 concert. No one had. Since there were no cards which matched the lighter blue version, it was, like FD-65, one of the images which very early on led to the suspicion that the Family Dog was reprinting posters which it did not designate as such (By the time I became aware of the California law on this topic, the Family Dog was long out of business.). Since I was not certain about the reprinting of postcards in 1978, in my 1979 guide I only mentioned that there were two variants, and although I had an opinion about which was the first, and that opinion was widely shared, I did not designate the darker blue as the original. By 1995 I knew enough about the printing history of other Family Dog posters from No. 43 to No. 86 to be able to say confidently that since there were very distinct color groups which did not overlap and that one and only one matched the cards, the one which matched the cards was an original and the one which did not was a reprint.

In the case of Family Dogs Nos. 70, 73, 76, 80 and 83 no separate groupings are now known to exist, and I tend to think that most of these will continue to be designated as printed only once, but future evidence is unpredictable. For the rest of the Family Dog items from No. 43 to No. 86, I believe that evidence exists for reprinting of each item except for No. 68 where both posters and postcards vary substantially indicating one printing with several ink changes and No. 55 where there are almost certainly two printings (A proof sheet of FD-55 and FD-57 exists.), but I am unable to separate them consistently to my own satisfaction. Mr. Kastor believes he can, and although I recommend that collectors who want to be certain of having an original buy one of each from him, I am strongly inclined to believe his designations are correct. We both have spent
hours and hours looking for a consistent scratch or dot to separate them but thus far we have been unsuccessful.

I hope the preceding will convince the reader that the scholarship of my guide which Mr. Cushway has sought to call into question is, in fact, accurate and trustworthy.

After Family Dog essay add:

The Mystery of the Family Dog Capitol Records Reprints

 

I have had in my possession for a number of years photocopies of two printing invoices from California Litho Plate Company, one of the companies which printed Family Dog material. While I have seen many of the yellow carbon copies of California Litho Plate invoices, I have not seen these two invoices in that form, only as photocopies, but I have no reason to believe they are not photocopies of genuine invoices. One is dated 10/9/1967. The other is dated

11/21/1967. The earlier one indicates that 100,000 Family Dog posters, 5,000 each of twenty different posters, were shipped directly from the printer to Kama Sutra Productions in Los Angeles. Kama Sutra Productions was associated with Capitol Records. The later invoice indicates that another 100,000 Family Dog posters, again 5,000 each of twenty different posters, were shipped directly from the printer to Capitol Records in Los Angeles. Several numbers appear on both invoices indicating that a total of 10,000 of those posters were printed, presumably at different times. The list on the 10/9/1967 invoice is as follows: 1, 3, 5, 14, 17, 21, 26, 28, 29, 30, 33, 38, 39, 41, 42, 43, 50, 54, 56, 60. The list on the 11/21/1967 invoice is as follows: 17, 26, 28, 38, 49, 50, 53, 59, 61, 64, 70, 72, 75, 77, 82, 83, 84, 85, 86, D-5.

 

Apparently it was the intention of Capitol Records to distribute these posters to record stores across the country where they would be sold. There are copies of magazine ads dating from that time showing nineteen of the twenty posters on the first invoice (Number 41 appears twice, and Number 38 does not appear.). I know of no ads showing the posters on the second invoice. Because these posters were shipped directly from the printer to Los Angeles, copies of many of these printings never were in the Family Dog inventory so no copies of those were distributed in the San Francisco Bay Area unless a handful wound up in a local record store. This also means that no copies of many of these were in the possession of Postermat, the North Beach San Francisco poster shop which bought the Family Dog inventory when the Family Dog closed in 1968. This shop sold posters from the mid 1960s through the 1980s before selling its inventory to Artrock which eventually sold its inventory of Family Dog material to Wolfgangs Vault. This resulted in an almost complete absence of many of these reprints in collections originating in the Bay Area.

 

Capitol Records has no archive of old promotional material.  Furthermore it is their policy to destroy any unused promotional material after six months. They were very helpful when I tried to find copies of these variants, but they were long gone.  Over the years I had been able to identify only a handful of these Kama Sutra Records reprints, mostly from the first list, Numbers 1, 21, 28, 33, 38 and 42. All the others were unknown. I thought it was possible that some of these so closely resembled other printings that no one had recognized them, or, more likely, they had never fallen into the hands of one of the few experts sufficiently familiar with the material that they immediately would see they were different.

 

In 2008 on the internet I encountered someone whose late father had been an executive of Kama Sutra Records. Among the items in his estate was a cardboard package containing copies of all twenty of the Kama Sutra Records reprints. The package, which was printed with the Family Dog logo, appears to have been the way in which at least some of the Kama Sutra Records reprints were distributed to record stores across the country.

 

I was able to study each of these twenty posters carefully, and I discovered that about half of them were from separate printings which can be distinguished from other Family Dog reprints. The others appear to be identical to copies which were in the Family Dog inventory when it was sold to Ben Friedman/Postermat. The fact that about half of these twenty Kama Sutra Records reprints match copies which were in the Family Dog inventory in substantial quantities indicates that at the time the Kama Sutra Records reprints were printed, another 5,000 of them were printed and sent to the Family Dog for distribution by them. By identical I do not mean simply the same colors or paper stocks but also the presence of common printing zits which are transitory in nature. These are caused by specks of dirt which get onto the printing plate during printing process and are periodically removed from the plate by the printer. If there are common printing zits on posters, it is clear the plate was not cleaned between the time one was printed and the time the other was printed. If a press run was ended at 5,000 and the plate was going to be reused, even the next day, the plate would have been cleaned, so the presence of common printing zits speaks strongly in favor of these which match copies in the Family Dog inventory being printed in one continuous press run of  10,000 half of which was sent to Kama Sutra Records and half to the Family Dog. Information about the specific posters can be found under the listing for each poster.

The fact that some of these Kama Sutra Records reprints have been so difficult to find because they are identical to other well-known Family Dog reprints leads me to believe that at least some and possibly most of the Capitol Records reprints have been so elusive because they, too, are identical to the well-known reprints that were in the Family Dog inventory. Since several of the Kama Sutra Records reprints turned out to be ones I had already catalogued, for example FD-1-RP-3, I think it is possible some of the Capitol Records reprints already have been entered in this Guide, for example FD-D5-RP-2. Unless and until a similar find of Capitol Records reprints is discovered, this will remain a mystery. Of course, if anyone finds such a package of Capitol Records reprints, I would very much like to see it.

 

I believe it is worth noting that several of these reprints which definitely were printed by California Litho Plate nevertheless bear credits from Bindweed Press, the printing of FD-26 which bears the notation “FD26 (3)”, or Double-H Press, FD-43-RP-3. This probably means that film from those printers came into the hands of California Litho Plate and was used to burn the plates used by California Litho Plate.

It is also worth noting that in 1967 or 1968 Chet Helms went to England, and a Family Dog office or shop was opened. I do not believe any concerts were promoted. The business at this location sold a number of things including posters. Some of these posters were numbered Family Dog posters (Some years ago I saw a number of posters of flags of European nations which had been stamped as sold by this business.). The San Francisco Family Dog office sent these posters to London where they were stamped on the front
“c FAMILY DOG PRODUCTIONS, LTD., ENGLAND”
and on the back
“FAMILY DOG PRODUCTIONS
   2 BLENHEIM CRESCENT
 LONDON, W.11  01-777-2823”
This was done with a rubber stamp. These posters are not listed under specific numbers because they are standard Family Dog posters.  They are no different from other listed posters except for the post printing additions of the two rubber stamps. 


After the Mystery of the Family Dog Capitol Records Reprints add:


FAMILY DOG--BINDWEED PRESS PRINTING RECORDS

    In the middle 1980s I acquired photocopies of the Bindweed Press invoices for the printing they did for the Family Dog. At the time no one was seriously devoted to figuring out what the printing history was for the later Family Dog posters from FD-42 on, and the possibilities of unmarked early reprints of Family Dog posters between FD-11 and FD-40 just was not high on anyones list of important things to do. I glanced at them, remembered a few generalities, and then put them in a box. In 20/20 hindsight it is too bad I did not study them carefully because if I had, I might have been able to distinguish the originals from the early reprints, but I did not, and that leads us to the current situation in 2013 where there simply is no possibility that anyone ever is going to be able to tell which are the originals and which are the very early unmarked reprints. This has created the necessity where all of these are accepted as originals. This idea is accepted by all the major dealers and collectors.

    Over the years I have discovered that several of these posters for which there are early reprints have two clear and distinct groups, one obviously the original, the other the reprint. We just do not know which is which. I have added these pairs to the Guide and to my website. These are FD-22, FD-23, FD-27, and FD-30. I thought that now it might be useful to give the readers of this Guide the additional information that does exist from these invoices so that they will know most of what I know. I also want to say something about the posters that were reprinted but for which there are no recognizable pairs. I say "most of what I know" because there are a handful of facts that someone might interpret to mean that this part of a pair or that part of a pair is the original and the other the reprint. Since nothing that I have been able to learn would prove positively that one or the other is an original or a reprint, I will not add to the confusion about this material by saying things that might only incline someone to think they know the difference. If there is no possibility of proving something with certainty, it would be irresponsible of me to say things like "I sort of think that this makes it more likely that A is the original and B the reprint." Furthermore it would generate real chaos in this market if five years from now what I had said was proved completely wrong. Those of you who have been collecting this material for a long time know what problems the misidentification of the Batman original caused plus the problems that arose from my errors regarding BG-21 and BG-38, and I hope I have gained the wisdom not to create similar difficulties now.

    With that preface, here is what I do know:

    There are three relevant invoices. One dated Nov. 30, 1966, the second dated Dec. 17, 1966, and the third Feb. 2 1967. The first two list all the Family Dog posters reprinted without notation on them showing they were reprints. These are 18, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34.
Despite the fact that there are two clear and distinct groups for 35 and 36, the printing records do not show them being reprinted without notation, so the two groups of 35 and 36 have to represent changes in the inks used during one press run. The February 2, 1967 invoice says that 14, 17, 22, 24, and 29 were reprinted. While the posters on the Nov. 30, 1966 and the Dec. 17, 1966 invoices were designated by the concert dates, the posters on the Feb. 2 1967 invoice were designated by what was then the new Family Dog numbering system.

    It is very important to note here that the Grateful Dead poster on this Feb. 2, 1967 invoice has the number 22 after the words "Grateful Dead,"  and the 13th Floor Elevators poster on this invoice has the number 24 after "13th Floor Elevators." I am inclined to believe these might be errors. I raise this possibility because no additional printing of FD-22 exists with bracketed reprint notation on it  printed on the standard Bindweed Press vellum stock and with Bindweed credit, nor is there a reprint of FD-24 with a bracketed reprint notation on Bindweed vellum with a Bindweed credit. The only other known legitimate reprint of FD-22 is the one on index printed by California Litho Plate which has the notation "No. 22-3" in the lower right corner, and the only other known reprint of FD-24 has the notation "No. 24-2" in the manner used by California Litho Plate in the lower right corner, not the bracketed notation used by Bindweed Press.

    I suspect that these actually refer to another Grateful Dead reprint, FD-26-RP-2 which is on Bindweed Vellum and bears the notation 26 (2), and another 13th Floor Elevators reprint,
FD-28-RP-2 which is on Bindweed vellum, and bears the notation 28 (2), but this is educated speculation on my part. The reason I consider this is that Bindweed charged the Family Dog for reprinting some Grateful Dead poster and some 13th Floor Elevators poster on Feb. 2 1967, but it appears these were not printings of FD-22, and FD-24. FD-22 and FD-24 had the same bands listed as the ones on the invoice, and the only other possibilities that I can think of are FD-26 and FD-28 which in fact had the same bands listed as FD-22 and FD-24. Remember that the Family Dog numbering system was very new at this time, that Bindweed did not print Family Dog posters after FD-40, and that Frank Westlake of Bindweed Press more than likely confused the numbers he was told although he apparently printed the images he was told with the correct numbers on them. The billing may have been done earlier or later, and he may have been confused by all this. As a side note, I once was shown a Bindweed printing plate for FD-30 which had the notation "30 (2)" on it, but this plate apparently never was used. No posters bearing this notation exist. Also when
Double-H Press reprinted FD-9 around the same time as these Bindweed reprints were done (a Double-H Press invoice in my possession documents this.), FD-9 was misidentified with the notation "4 (2)." This proves the printers used by the Family Dog had confusion about what were the correct numbers in the new numbering system.

    It is worth noting that the printing plates used for these early, unmarked reprints almost certainly were the printing plates used for the originals. Frank Westlake printed most of the Family Dog posters he printed on the same stock, so it is reasonable to assume he printed almost all these reprints on the same stock. He must have bought this stock in quantity from the same paper dealer. This is in contrast to Bill Graham's early printers for whom Wes Wilson purchased remaindered paper in odd lots so that the stock used for many of the Bill Graham early originals varies. Since the paper stock and the printing plates for these unmarked Family Dog reprints were the same as for the originals, the only differences on these reprints from the originals is the possibility that Frank Westlake mixed different proportions of inks for these reprints, so although he strove to make the colors the same, they might not be identical. It also is possible that in the weeks between the original printings and the reprint printings, the plates might have been slightly damaged leading to additional minor print flaws.

    In the Guide and in the corrections and additions section of my website I have designated two groups for FD-22, FD-23, FD-27, and FD-30. There is no overlap between the two groups. No transitional copies exist between them, and they obviously represent an original and a reprint. We just do not know which is which, and it is highly doubtful at this late date almost fifty years later that we ever will. These distinctions are in the Guide and/or one my website and need not be discussed further here.

    All of the reprints on the Nov. 30 1966 and the Dec. 17 1966 invoices except FD-18 are preceded by the notation "1M." This means that all of these reprints were done in press runs of 1,000. The reprint invoice of Nov. 30 1966 listing FD-18 shows only 300 copies were printed. Since FD-18 was printed on a paper stock very different from all the other Bindweed Press Family Dog posters, I tend to assume that Frank Westlake had only 300 sheets left over from what he had bought for the original printing, and he used these for the reprint. This probably was a remaindered paper, and more identical stock was not available, so that is why there were only 300 reprints. In this case this variant, if we ever distinguish it, will be very scarce.

    The difficulties of even finding what might be pairs are made very clear by something that happened recently dealing with FD-24. I was looking at about seven or eight copies, and I noticed that there were two fairly distinct groups based on the reds and the greens. Some of them were more light and pale, and some of them were more rich and dark. It did not appear to be more and/or less ink on the plate. The color itself appeared different. I looked for some printing flaw which might be common to one group and not appear in the other, and I found a flaw that appeared on all the lighter ones and none of the darker ones. I knew better than to conclude something from this small a sample, but I thought it certainly was worth further research. I emailed Mike Storeim of Classic Posters, and he had two more that fit the characteristic. Then I called Dennis King who has spent almost as long as I have looking at these posters, and I managed to persuade him to look through his inventory. He found that not only did he have copies where the printing flaw was greater and lesser down to almost disappearing, he had copies of both color variations with and without the flaw. Obviously this was not a distinction that proved anything besides the possibility that the inks were changed during one or the other press run, and that something went wrong with the plate that printed the red during that run. This sort of thing has happened to me several times with other early Family Dog posters. Some characteristic appears which I think might be significant, and after much research and bothering patient people to whom I am very grateful, I discover that I have barked up the wrong tree.

    FD-25 is a poster which has not yet reached a very high price level so it is one that dealers still might have several copies in inventory. In the last decade I have looked at a lot of them, and I can not seem to find anything, printing mark or color distinction, which reliably separates them at all much less into two distinct groups.

    By this point it is unlikely that it would be possible to assemble fifteen or twenty copies of the Skeleton and Roses, FD-26, original in one place at one time, and so many of the copies have been subjected to so much sun light that it is doubtful that even if there were a distinguishing characteristic, it is unlikely scholars could find it and then prove that it distinguished two separate printings.

    On FD-28 I am inclined to believe we never will find anything to distinguish the two printings because instead of everything being the same as on FD-25, on FD-28 there is a great deal of variation in all the colors. The inks obviously were changed during one or both press runs and transitional copies between the color extremes exist.

    On FD-29 there are original copies that are a medium green which is consistent, and there are copies which are dark green which varies from fairly dark to very dark, but the really dark ones are very scarce, so it seems likely that this was an experiment before actual printing started, and that this color was rejected. The medium green is by far the best artistically so it would seem the others were rejected. This seems to prevent using this distinction to declare two separate groups.

    On FD-31-OP-2 the printing is monochrome black, and neither I nor anyone else I ever have discussed this with has distinguished any copies (other than a couple with experimental additional silver ink) which are different from the others. It would seem highly unlikely that FD-31-OP-1 with the wrong date was the version that was reprinted without marking. This means this probably is the one most likely never to be separated into two groups.

    In contrast to most of the others where there are too many variations, FD-32 seems to be the one where the colors across the runs are very consistent. The means it is unlikely this one ever will be separated into two groups.

    FD-33 has at least three different variant originals, medium green, dark green, and olive green. With three variants it obviously is impossible to divide them into two groups, so it is unlikely we ever will know even what the two groups are, much less which group might have been before and which after the concert.

    FD-34 is the last poster mentioned on these Bindweed invoices, and for this one there is a progression from lighter to darker colors with all the steps in between. Again there is no possibility of separating them into two groups.

    After all this information is considered, what should someone who collects these posters do now? On the one hand if you collect these posters based on aesthetics and for decor, to hang in your dining room, you should not do anything different than you have done all along. You should buy the originals that please your taste. Until and unless humans create a time machine, no one ever will know which of any of these groups are originals and which are reprints, and this means that if your taste prefers the orange FD-27 over the reddish orange version, you should buy it and hang it in your living room. It is an original. If you prefer the reddish orange, buy that for the same reason. It is an original.

    On the other hand if you are a collector amassing a set of originals of these posters, I think your situation is quite different. When you collected your copies of Bill Graham posters and you bought  BG-29, you acquired one of each of the three different variants, the black and white, the magenta, and the purple. These are all originals, but they are clearly different one from another. The same is true of these Family Dog posters. They are variants of the original, and you should have one of each in your collection when the groups are obviously separate and distinct. In the case of those numbers where there are no separate and distinct groups, then there is not much point in your spending several thousand dollars to acquire four different copies of, for example, FD-33 because this one is several angstroms different in its shade of green from another one you already have. If you bought every one that was slightly different from the others you have, you could wind up with eighteen of them and still be looking for number nineteen. That way lies madness.

    One  last thing which occurred to me as I was finishing this essay: in the mid 1970s I spoke with someone whose identity I do not remember, but he must have been someone I considered reliable because I consider the following factual. He said that when the Family Dog went out of business around New Year's Day 1968/1969 after losing the lease on the Avalon Ballroom, he went by the Family Dog storefront and found the door open but no one from the Family Dog there. He said there were several people going through the Family Dog inventory and taking whatever they wanted. He said that at that time he found copies of Family Dog Bindweed originals. Since most of the Family Dog Bindweed originals that had been printed before the shows had been posted to advertise the shows, it would appear that as late as the end of the Avalon Ballroom era, the Family Dog inventory still included some of the unmarked Bindweed reprints I have discussed here. On a more primary level this would appear to be further good evidence that the reprints on the invoices I have actually were printed.

    As I end a lot of my emails to collectors asking me questions, "I hope this helps."



 


 

 

 

Family Dog

Under the following Family Dog items (FD-5,14,17,21,26,43,64,67) add an additional reprint with the entry:

"Pomegranate Press printed an authorized reprint of this image in the 1990’s. A Pomegranate
Press credit appears on the reverse"

Under FD-1 description after “… suggested by Chet Helms.” add “The title of this book is “The American Heritage Book of Indians.” The editor in chief is Alvin M. Josephy Jr. The title of the photograph is “Sioux
Chiefs.” It was taken by Edward Curtis.

Change FD-1-RP-3 to read

FD-1-RP-3 In 2000 a copy of the third printing was discovered. It incorrectly bears the
notation "No.1-2" in the lower right corner. The "Washington Street" credit is
deleted and replaced in the lower left bottom margin with "1967 c Family Dog
Productions 639 Gough St., San Francisco, Calif. 94102". The distance from the            base of the "9" to the top of the "o" is the same as on FD-1-RP-2. In 2008 it was determined that this is the Kama Sutra Records reprint. The 2000 copy and the 2008 Kama Sutra Records copy are both on identical stock which has a woven or “rows” texture on the front as well as other similarities. 14 9/32" x 20 5/16"   14 13/32" x 20 9/32"
After notes under FD-1 add:
Important note 2010. In 2010 I saw a copy of FD-1-OHB-A that had no visible dot screen in the
area around the Native American figure in the Family Dog logo. I was able to establish that this
was an original by three means. First I looked at it under 20x magnification and saw remnants
of dot screen not visible to the naked eye. Second this copy is on stock which has a woven or
rows textured back. All known copies of the original are on stock with a woven or rows tex-
tured back. The forgery has a random textured back. Third the stock of this copy will not glow
or fluoresce under black light. Other originals will not do so either. The stock of the forgery will
glow or fluoresce under black light. Please be aware of this new information when examining
copies of FD-1-OHB-A.

Under FD-4 change FD-4-RP-4 to read:
FD-3-RP-4            
In 2008 the Kama Sutra Records reprint was discovered. It can be distinguished from FD-3-RP-3 by the change of the Family Dog address 
                                to 639 Gough St. “No3-3” appears in the lower right corner. 14 19/64” x 20 5/16”

 Under FD-5 change date to "4/22&23/66."

Add to FD-5-RP-3 This poster is on stock which glows or floresces under black light.
Change FD-5-RP-4 to read

"FD-5-RP-4 The fourth printing on uncoated index has the same markings as FD-5-RP-3. The blue of this printing is substantially lighter than FD-5-RP-3, and the red is slightly lighter. The length is sufficiently different to use as a distinguishing characteristic. In 2008 it was discovered that this is the Kama Sutra Records reprint. The stock has "rows" or woven texture on the back and does not glow or floresce under black light. The previously known copy and the Kama Sutra Records copy discovered in 2008 have identical linear dimensions.
14 21/64" x 20 55/64"

Under FD-5-OHB-A add:   "In 2009 I was showed a copy of this handbill which was substantially smaller than other copies I had seen. I studied it very carefully under high magnification and determined that it was not trimmed after distribution to hide edge damage but was distributed in this smaller size. Henceforth it should be noted that this handbill appears in various sizes. This item does not have the perforations of FD-5-RHB-D. 11 23/32"x 15 3/16"

After FD-5-OHB-C add
FD-5-RHB-D     Volume 9 Number 1 of CA Magazine: The Journal of Communication Art
                            from 1967 had an article on psychedelic posters. Bound into the spine and
                            detachable by perforations was a handbill of FD-5. The image size was the
                            same as FD-5-OHB-A, but the paper dimensions were 11 3/4” x 15 9/16”

Under FD-7 move "Daily Flash" from artists to acts.

Add to FD-9-RP-2 "There is a great deal of variation to the green of this printing from light to
olive to fairly dark."

Under FD-9 notes add that the picture is of Greta Garbo from the 1932 film Mata Hari.

Under FD-11 change "FD-1-OP-1" to "FD-11-OP-1."

Under FD-12-OP-1 add:   In 2011 a forgery dating from the mid 1970s was discovered. The distinguishing characteristic of this forgery is the horizontal measurement of the distance along the    
                                          bottom edge of the rectangle surrounding "AVALON BALLROOM" from the outer side of the left edge of this rectangle to the outer side of the right edge. This
                                          measurement on genuine copies is 13 7/32" plus or minus 1/64."
After FD-12-PP-5 add:     FD-12-FP-6  In 2011 a forgery of the original printing of this poster was discovered. It appears to date from the mid 1970s. The stock used was quite thin. The best
                                                                way to distinguish this forgery from FD-12-OP-1 and FD-12-OP-2 is the measurement described under FD-12-OP-1. On the forgery this distance is
                                                                13 1/64." It is not possible to give the dimensions of this forgery because the copy which was discovered had been trimmed.


<>After FD-12 add:
FD-12        The Quick and the Dead   
                   6/10 & 11/66        Avalon Ballroom
                   Wes Wilson          Grateful Dead   
                                                Quicksilver Messenger Service   
                                                New Tweedy Brothers   
Poster image completely different from FD-12
FD-12-PP-6    In 2004 a pirate poster for the FD-12 event appeared on eBay. The image of
    this poster bears no resemblance to the lawfully copyrighted image designed
    in 1966 by Wes Wilson. The exact date of the creation of this pirate is unknown, but the condition and age of the paper on which it was printed indicate
    that it is at least ten years old. As pirate printers have become increasingly
    eager to make an illegal dollar, they have resorted to a variety of attacks upon
    the limited funds of most collectors. One of the ways they have done this is to
    create completely new posters for actual events which took place decades before the bogus posters were created. One of the most obnoxious facts about
    these bogus posters is how bad they are artistically. This item is not just an
    infringement upon the Family Dog copyright. It is an insult to the talents of the
    great artists who created the wonderful posters which characterized the psyche-
    delic era, and all reputable scholars of this material, dealers who deal in it and
    collectors who collect it urge everyone to avoid these awful insults to the era and not patronize anyone who sells them. 11 27/32” x 17

Add to FD-14-OP-1 "Most originals were printed in silver ink."

Under FD-14-RP-3 add: "This printing is on stock which is smooth on the front."

Change FD-14-RP-4 to read:
FD-14-RP-4          In 2008 the Kama Sutra Records reprint was discovered. Notations are the same as those on FD-14-RP-3, but this separate printing is on stock which has a “rows” or woven texture on the front. The blue is slightly darker on FD-14-RP-4 than it is on FD-14-RP-3.
13 59/64 x 19 29/32”

 


After FD-14-RP-7 add

"FD-14-OP-8 In 1999 several copies of a variant original printing were discovered printed with gold ink."
Under FD-14-PP-5 and FD-14-PP-6 change "priate" to "pirate."

Under FD-14-OHB-B change "FD-14-HBO-6" to "FD-14-OHB-A."

Under FD-14-RPC-C change "5 29/32"" to "4 29/32""

Add to FD-15-OP-1 “Underneath “Sopwith Camel” the poster reads “FRI. AND SAT. NIGHTS ONLY.” Apparently due to a late change in the bill some copies have a small sticker covering “SAT.” “SUN” is hand written on this sticker.”

Under FD-15-RP-2 change "two" to "three" and "both" to "all" twice. Add "It is on dull/matte finish stock."

Under FD-15-RP-3 add "It is on a semi glossy stock."

After FD-15-RP-3 add

"FD-15-RP-4 This variant is part of the same press run as FD-15-RP-2, but it is .0090" thick. It is on a semi glossy stock."
Under FD-17-RP-4 add: "This printing is on stock which glows or floresces under black light.
Change FD-17-RP-5 to read:
FD-17-RP-5           
In 2008 the Kama Sutra Records reprint was discovered. The notations on it are the same as those on FD-17-RP-4, but this printing is on
                                stock which will not glow or floresce under black light
.  14” x 20 1/16”


After FD-17-RP-7 add:
FD-17-PP-8       In 2011 a pirate selling on www.amazon.com bootlegged this poster. The stock
    used was slick and glossy. It is difficult to say which variant was used as the
    basis of this pirate because the “Jefferson Airplane/Great Society” lettering is
    blue and the “Avalon Ballroom” lettering is purple. This does no match any
    known variant poster or handbill. The size is the distinguishing characteristic.
    12” x 18”


Under FD-17-OHB-A change "FD-17-OHB-6" to FD-17-OHB-A."

Under FD-17 change handbills to read:


Under FD-19-OP-1 change "right" to "left."

Under FD-20-OHB-A add:
It should be noted that the FD-20 image above is taken from the poster. The handbills are slightly different without the rays and with the lettering arranged differently and lower down and around the five men picture.


Under FD-21 change the description to read:
“This poster is several shades of red and blue in a white frame. For many years the central image of this poster was thought to be the City Hall of San Francisco after the 1906 earthquake, but in 2003 it was pointed out to me by Christian Peterson that this is actually the Sonoma County Court House after the 1906 earthquake. “

After FD-21-RP-5 add

Change the text of FD-22-OP-1 and FD-22-OP-2 to read:
FD-22-OP-1    There were two printings done on vellum, one just before the concert (1,500 copies) and one a few weeks after (1,000 copies).  Both have “The Bindweed Press San Francisco”
                         just left of bottom center.  The only way it is known there were two printings is from printing records. No one knows which is the earlier and which is the later, so both are counted
                         as originals.  Both are c. 19 15/16” long.  One is c. 14 1/4” wide. In recent years leading up to 2013 I encountered increasingly more evidence that the width of the two variant
                         original of FD-22 was not a reliable distinguishing factor. Please stop using this characteristic to tell them apart. After much examination of FD-22 original posters, it has become
                         apparent that some of them have a great deal of  black back print, enough that it is possible to recognize the image on the reverse. Henceforth FD-22-OP-1 will be identified by the
                         presence of this extensive back print. 14 7/32” x 19 61/64   
FD-22-OP-2    The other nearly identical printing is c. 13 15/16” wide.  FD-22-OP-2 will now be identified by the almost complete absence of black back print. On this variant only a few specks
                        are present, certainly not enough to identify the image on the front. Both are considered originals.  13 59/64” x 19 61/64”

After FD-22-PP-4 add After FD-22-PP-6 add:
FD-22-PP-7       In 2011 a pirate selling on www.amazon.com bootlegged this poster. The stock
           used was slick and glossy. The background is not white but gray. The source of
           this pirate is unknown. It does not match any previous original, reprint or pi-
           rate. There is a white border around the gray background. The size is the dis-
           tinguishing characteristic. 12 1/64” x 18 1/64”


Under FD-23 after FD-23-RP-2 add:
FD-23-OP-3       In 2009 I saw two copies of a  variant original of this image.  On this variant the areas imprinted in blue on the common version are printed in the same green as the background. The yellow on this version is much darker than it is on the common version. The Bindweed credit appears in the same location as it does on FD-23-OP-1.
14 7/32” x 19 15/16”


Add to FD-24-OP-1 "The Family Dog logo is a negative image in white with little detail."

Add to FD-24-RP-2 "The Family Dog logo is a positive image in black with lots of detail."

After FD-24-RP-2 add

After FD-24-PP-3 add:
FD-24-PP-4  In 2011 a pirate selling on the internet bootlegged this poster. The stock used was glossy. The size is the distinguishing characteristic. 12 1/64” x 17 63/64”

After FD-24-OHB-D add
FD-24-OHB-E   In 2014 a fifth variant was discovered. This variant is light off red with dot screen background on white stock with blank reverse.

Under FD-25 descriptions add: “The man in the image was named Bear Bull. He was from the Blackfoot tribe. The photograph was taken by Edward S. Curtis and dates from 1926.”

Special Correction

In the third edition of my guide dated 1996 under FD-26 the second
entry which is for the second printing, a reprint, incorrectly is listed
as 'FD-26-OP-2'. The text describes it as a reprint, and this error was
corrected to read 'FD-26-RP-2' in all later editions, but this correction
was never listed with the other corrections. Please note that
the correct listing for this item which is a reprint is 'FD-26-RP-2.'

Under FD-26 add
          Change FD-26-RP-4 to read: In 2007 I located a copy of the Kama Sutra Records reprint of this poster. It turned out to be identical to FD-26-RP-3. See
          "The Mystery of the Capitol Records and Kama Sutra Records Reprints" in the Table of Contents.

FD-26-RP-13 A Portal Publications reprint exists on thin stock. It bears the credit “RP 006  c 1977  Mouse/Kelley Portal Publications Ltd. Corte Madera. California 94925 Litho in U.S.A.”  on the right side of the bottom margin. 20 3/64” x 27 63/64”


Add to FD-26-PP-9:

Add to FD-26-PP-10 14 1/16" x 19 11/16"

After FD-26-PP-10 add:

After FD-26-RP-13 add:
FD-26-PP-14  In 2008 a pirate printer, probably in Australia, printed two different bootlegs of this image both of which were sold on ebay. Both are distinguished by the fact that white                             areas of these posters are not pure white but contain small, colored dots. These posters are based on FD-26-RP-3. They both were printed digitally on semi-gloss stock, not                         uncoated index as the lawful reprint was. The distinction between them is size. This pirate/bootleg measures 13 7/8" x 10 61/64"
FD-26-PP-15  This is the larger of the two 2008 Australian pirate/bootlegs. 14 1/8" x 21 3/32"

After FD-26-PP-15 add:
FD-26-PP-16     In 2011 someone decided that there were not enough bootleg versions of this image so they decided to create another one. This one apparently is based on the original because it
                          has the Bindweed credit but no numbers in the lower left corner. It is on thin, glossy stock. It has the credit “Pyramid America” in the lower left corner. 24 1/32” x 36 1/64”



Change "FD-26-PC-B" to "FD-26-RPC-B"

Under FD-26-PPC-C change the first sentence to read:
Under FD-27 change the notes to read:
This poster is dark green, screened dark green, orange or rust, black and white on a white
background. The central image is the drawn head of a snarling wolf.
This is the only Family Dog poster for which a silk screen version was created prior to the con-
cert. Only 20 or 30 of these silk screens were done, and only a handful survive making them
one of the most sought-after of Family Dog items. These silk screens are substantially larger
than the typical 14" x 20" size of most Family Dog posters. It should be noted that Stanley
Mouse had studied silk screening in the early 1960s in Detroit and was an accomplished silk
screen artist long before the Family Dog series began.
Previous material in the notes incorrectly stated there was a transitional copy showing a mix of the orange and red/orange inks indicating only one press run. This is incorrect. Printing receipts from Bindweed Press show this poster was reprinted on or about November 30, 1966. The supposedly transitional copy really is just a red/orange copy with a little less of the red/orange ink.




Under FD-28-OP-1 add: "Many copies of this poster have the Bindweed Press credit cut in half so that only the top half appears. In 2011 a copy was discovered with the entire Bindweed credit
                                        eliminated. This is due to the sheet being fed into the printing press at a slight angle. On this copy the blue background at the top is closer to the edge of the paper at the
                                        left side than on the right side. This resulted in the part of the blue printing plate with the Bindweed credit missing the sheet entirely. It is possible other copies like this
                                        exist. It should be possible to authenticate these copies as genuine by other evidence, but such copies should not be considered genuine unless they are authenticated as
                                        genuine by someone can identify that they were printed by the correct original printing plate on the correct paper stock."

Under FD-28 change FD-28-RP-5 to read  
FD-28-RP-5            In 2002 an alert Doug Garn noticed
what was then thought to be a copy of the Capitol Records reprint of  FD-28. It is distinguished by the  
                                notation  “28 (3)” in the lower left corner. The copyright address is 639 Gough St. 
In 2008 it was discovered that this actually is the Kama
                                Sutra Records reprint.
13 31/32” x 20 1/16”

 Under notes under FD-28 change the notes to read: "The striped effect was not produced by shining light on the face of a man through Venetian blinds as had been previously stated in this guide. It was produced by a light beam used by the USA military for making a facial contour map for an Air Force flight helmet. The photographer was the famous Life magazine photographer, Ralph Morse.

After FD-28-PP-7 add:
FD-28-PP-8   In 2011 a pirate selling on the internet bootlegged this poster. The stock used was glossy. The size is the distinguishing characteristic. 12 1/64” x 17 63/64”


Under FD-29-RP-4 change "right corner" to "left margin."
Under FD-29 change FD-29-RP-4 and FD-29-RP-5 to read

FD-29-RP-4          This printing on uncoated index bears “29(3)” in the lower left corner.  No “Bindweed” credit appears.  “© Family Dog Productions 639 Gough St., San Francisco, Calif. 94102” appears in the lower left margin. This  printing is on stock which glows or floresces under black light. 14 “ x 20 1/32”

FD-29-RP-5 In 2008 the Kama Sutra Records reprint was discovered. It bears the same notations as FD-29-RP-4, but it is a separate printing. Colors, paper stock and linear dimensions are all different. This printing is on stock that does not glow or floresce under black light. 13 63/64” x 19 31/32”

After FD-29-RP-5 add:
FD-29-PP-6    In 2008 a pirate printer, probably in Australia, printed a pirate/bootleg poster of this image which was sold on ebay. This bootleg was based on FD-29-RP-4. It can be
                       distinguished by the fact that the white areas are not pure white but contain small, colored dots. It was printed digitally on semi-gloss stock unlike the uncoated index of the
                       lawful reprint.  13 61/64" x 19 63/64"


Under FD-29-RPC-H change "Keley" to "Kelley."

Under FD-29-OHB-D and FD-29-OHB-E change "boarder" to "border."

Under both FD-30-OP-1 and FD-30-OP-2 change "1996" to "1966."

Under FD-30 change FD-30-RP-3 and FD-30-RP-4 to read

FD-30-RP-3         The next printing, a reprint, bears the notations “No. 30-3” in the lower left corner and “1967 © Family Dog Productions 639 Gough St., San Francisco, Calif. 94102” in the lower right.  No poster bearing “No. 30-2” is known to exist. This poster is on a stock which has a mild glow or florescence on the back when exposed to black light. 14 9/32” x 19 31/32”

FD-30-RP-4 In 2008 the Kama Sutra Records reprint was discovered. It was a separate printing. It bears the same notations listed for FD-30-RP-3, but the paper stock is different, colors are different and linear dimensions are different. This stock does not glow or floresce when exposed to black light, but the easiest way to distinguish this printing is that it is 3/8” narrower than FD-30-RP-3. 13 7/8” x 19 57/64”

 

Under FD-33 artists add: Wes Wilson
**In 2014 I was going through the Guide, and I happened to stop on this image. I gave some serious thought to the artists’ credit for this image and decided that the main portion of this image, the Family Dog logo, was created by Wes Wilson, and although I do not think he should get a credit on all the Family Dog posters on which the logo appears, I now think that he should get credit as one of the artists on this individual poster because the logo is the main element of the image. I exchanged emails with Wes and asked for his thoughts on this, because I would not change something like this without consulting him, but he, too, thought about it, and he agreed with me that this poster should be considered a collaboration between Mouse and Kelley and
himself. Accordingly his name has been added to the artists credits for this poster.

Under FD-33-OP-1 change "left" to "right."
Under FD-33-RP-4 add "In 2008 it was discovered that this was the Kama Sutra Records reprint. The copy that I obtained in the mid 1970s from Bob Cohen, Chet Helms' associate, was identical in microscopic printing marks, linear dimensions and paper stock to the Kama Sutra Records copy."

After FD-33-RP-4 add:
FD-33-PP-5      In 2008 a pirate printer, probably in Australia, printed a pirate/bootleg poster of this image which was sold on ebay. This bootleg was based on FD-33-RP-4. It can be
                       distinguished by the fact that the white areas are not pure white but contain small, colored dots. It was printed digitally on semi-gloss stock unlike the uncoated index of the
                       lawful reprint. 14 1/8" x 20 17/64"

After FD-34-RP-2 add:
FD-34-PP-3  In 2011 a pirate selling on the internet bootlegged this poster. The stock used was glossy. The size is the distinguishing characteristic. 12 1/64” x 17 63/64”

After FD-34-OHB-D add:
FD-34-OHB-E   In 2011 a copy of FD-34-OHB-C was discovered with a page of Mojo Navigator printed on the back. This sheet probably  was printed with the handbill front and then the  Mojo
                           Navigator page added to the back and finally inserted in an issue of the magazine. It is likely that other issues of Mojo Navigator had other Family Dog handbills in them besides
                           this and FD-40-OHB-D which has been known for a long time.  8 29/64” x 11 15/64”

Under FD-36 change date to read "11/25 & 26/66."

After FD-36-RP-3 add

"FD-36-OP-4 In 1999 copies of a variant original printing were discovered on orange stock."

Under FD-38-RP-3 add, "In 2008 it was discovered that this was the Kama Sutra Records reprint. The copy that I obtained in the mid 1970s from Bob Cohen, Chet Helms' associate, was identical in paper stock and linear dimensions to the Kama Sutra Records copy. The paper stock was woven or "rows" texture on the front.

Change FD-39-RP-2 and FD-39-RP-3 to read:

FD-39-RP-2*      This reprint is on uncoated index and adds “No. 39” in the lower right corner.  No indication is made of second or third printing. This printing has a blue which is a medium blue darker than that of FD-39-RP-3. 13 61/64” x 20 1/64”

FD-39-RP-3* In 2008 the Kama Sutra Records reprint was discovered. It bears only one major printing differences from FD-39-RP-2. The only consistent recognizable difference is that the blue of this printing is a light blue lighter than that of
FD-39-RP-2. 13 3/4” x 20 1/16”

*After looking at a lot of copies of FD-39-RP-2 and several of FD-39-RP-3, I discovered that both versions were printed at the same time. The evidence for this is
common printing  zits on both and darker blue and lighter blue versions. The blue ink simply was changed between the run of 5000 of one and 5000 of the other. I have tried to avoid any distinction between two printings of a poster which requires someone to have more than one item in his/her hand, but here this is unavoidable. Both versions exist on stocks which have and do not have “rows” or woven texture, so that criterion can not be used. Some copies of each glow or floresce under black light, and others do not, so that criterion can not be used. The stocks are all of similar thickness so that can not be used. I even noticed that linear dimensions, length and width  varied on both versions. The only real
difference is the color, and I believe the semantics of color are unreliable for describing the difference between these shades of blue. Since these are reprints and most collectors are not that concerned with telling reprints apart, especially ones probably printed an hour or two apart, I am going to make an exception this one time. If you need to tell these two reprints apart, you will have to have one of each in front of you. The darker will be FD-39-RP-2, and the lighter will be FD-39-RP-3.

 



After FD-39-RP-3 add
FD-39-OP-4       In 2003 a variant of the original was discovered which was not printed with the black
                           plate. On this variant the Indian appears blue which was printed under the black on those
                           copies which were printed with the black plate.  “The Bindweed Press San Francisco”
                           appears in white drop out in the lower margin at left. 13 49/64” x 19 61/64”

After FD-40-OP-1 add:
FD-40-PP-2        In 2011 a pirate selling on www.amazon.com bootlegged this poster. It was done on slick, glossy stock. The size is the distinguishing characteristic. 12” x 18”

Under FD-40-OHB-A delete “Toward the end of the press run the red ran low, and many copies
               exist with pale red.”
After FD-40-OHB-B add
FD-40-OHB-C  It had previously been thought that the version with pale color instead of red was a result of the red ink running low in the reservoir of the press. Closer  examination of this version shows that it is a different color than pale red. Accordingly it has been designated a new variant.  Thanks to Phil Cushway for pointing this out to me in 2003. 8 17/32” x 10 31/32”

FD-40-OHB-D  Some copies of this handbill had part of an interview with Country Joe and the Fish on the back. This was then distributed with an issue of Mojo Navigator.

Under FD-41-RP-2 change “41-2” to “41 (2).”
Under FD-41-RP-2 add: This more commonly seen variant lists the Family Dog address as 639 Gough Street.
Change FD-41-RP-3 to read: The Kama Sutra Records reprint discovered in 2008 lists the Family Dog address as 1725 Washington Street. This means that FD-41-RP-3 predates FD-41-RP-2. 13 63/64" x 20"

Under FD-41 change FD-41-OHB-B to read:

The other handbill is black ink on coral paper. Both have a Family Dog credit and
bulk postal information on the reverse. In 2001 a copy was discovered which had been
mailed to someone on the mailing list. 8 17/32" x 11 1/32"


Under FD-41 after FD-41-OHB-B add

FD-41-OHB-C Some copies of FD-41-OHB-B were hand addressed and sent to people on the mailing list.
Under FD-42-RP-2 add: "In 2008 when I was able to compare copies of this item with the copy that came from Kama Sutra Records, it was possible to establish that this was the Kama Sutra Records printing. Paper stocks were the same, size was within 1/64” and there were several common printing zits.
13 63/64” x 19 31/32”

 


Change the text of FD-43 to read:
 

FD-43-OP-1        The poster was printed three times.  One original has “Double-H Press” credit below the Family Dog phone number. Number appears in lower left corner on poster. 14 1/64” x 20”  See FD-43-RP-3 for reprint with “Double –H Press” credit.

*FD-43-OP-2 In 2003 it was discovered that the printing which deletes the “Double-H Press” credit is an original.  Accordingly this designation has been changed from

FD-43-RP-2 to FD-43-OP-2. See evidence at the end of this section.

14 5/64” x 19 61/64”

**FD-43-RP-3 In 2007 I had access to a number of posters from the estate of an executive of Kama Sutra Records.  One of these posters was a copy of FD-43. To my surprise this poster had the “Double-H Press” credit. Printing records of California Litho Plate show that they reprinted this poster for Kama Sutra Records long after the concert, so this poster definitely is a reprint, so all Double-H credit posters of FD-43 will need to be examined to see if they are reprints. I discovered that the original with the Double-H credit is on stock which floresces or glows under black light. The reprint with the Double-H credit does not. See further evidence at the end of this section. 14 1/32” x 19 59/64”

FD-43-RP-4 Pomegranate Press printed an authorized reprint of this image in the 1990’s. It is the same image as FD-43-OP-2 with no Double-H credit. A Pomegranate Press credit appears on the reverse. 12 29/32” x 14 15/16”

FD-43-OPC-A The postcard appears in three forms.  The first has a blank reverse. 4 31/32” x 7 3/32”

FD-43-OPC-B The second has a Family Dog credit and bulk mail permit on the reverse.   5 1/16” x 7”

FD-43-OPC-C Some copies of FD-43-OPC-B were mechanically addressed and sent to people on the mailing list.

 F. D. 43 Moby Grape

This poster is several shades of bluish gray and white on a red background. The central image is a photograph of a kneeling woman, Alla Nazimova, from the 1923
silent movie Salome. The card for this image was the first in the numbered Family Dog series to have been printed on the same sheet as the poster, at first one poster and four cards and then shortly thereafter one poster and six cards which became the usual policy. After this point only a handful of cards were printed separately from the posters. As far as is currently known no Family Dog cards ever were reprinted when the posters were reprinted during the 1967 – 1968 period. For this reason with only two or three exceptions the cards parallel the original printings perfectly and comparison between the card and poster of a specific number for identical colors is usually a reliable means of distinguishing original printing posters from reprint posters incorrectly bearing the designation "-1" in the numbered Family Dog series (This does not apply to the Bill Gra-
ham series.).

 

*Evidence: Since the time of the concerts it had been assumed that because the Double-H credit printing was more scarce than the one without the credit and because the change in credit implied a change in printers, that the Double-H credit printing was the original and the one without this credit was a reprint. In 2003 Phil Cushway of Artrock discovered a printer’s proofsheet which had a single FD-43 poster, four postcards and concert tickets. This proofsheet did not have the Double-H credit. Because it is known that the cards were never reprinted and tickets were certainly not reprinted (In fact the usual policy was for the printer to stop the press when enough tickets had been printed and then remove that portion of the image from the printing plate so that printer’s proofs often exist both with and without tickets.), it is clear that the printing without the Double-H credit is an original printing. Accordingly the designation of this printing in this Guide had been changed to “FD-43-OP-2.” It was then necessary to consider the possibility that the Double-H credit printing might be a reprint. This was very unlikely because Double-H did not print any later printings after FD-43, but it had to be considered. Using a 20x loupe, I examined the paper stock used for the Double-H credit printing. I  compared this to the stock used for the mailed cards sent to people on the mailing list. The stocks are identical. Since the mailers were printed first, well before the concert, the Double-H credit printing is also an original printing. It is noteworthy that the printing without the Double-H credit appears on two slightly different stocks. These differences are most notable with respect to how they appear under black light. Furthermore the blank backed cards which were handed out in the street to advertise the event also are printed on two slightly different stocks which correspond to the two stocks of the printing without the Double-H credit, further evidence that these posters were printed before the concert. Why the Double-H credit was removed at some point in the press run is not known for certain.  One possibility suggested by Jacaeber Kastor is that since the printing records show that the original of this poster was printed by California Litho Plate, not Double-H, and that the ticket outlets strip on FD-43 is based on the ticket outlets strip of

FD-42, that the ticket outlets strip from FD-42 inadvertently was attached to the FD-43 artwork without the Double-H credit being removed. The plate was made from this artwork, and printing was begun. Shortly after printing was begun, one of the pressmen at California Litho Plate noticed the Double-H credit, stopped the presses and removed the Double-H credit. Since cost was a big factor in printing these posters, the copies with the improper Double-H credit were not thrown out but were delivered to the Family Dog along with the ones without the Double-H credit. All things considered, this makes sense because ticket outlets strips were occasionally reused without careful attention being paid to incorrect information they might include. This was also the case with BG-230 where a ticket outlets strip including David Singer’s name was attached to a poster by Pat Hanks.

 

**Further evidence: While it was good evidence that the copy of  FD-43 which came from the estate of a Kama Sutra Records executive was a reprint just because it came from that estate, and printing records show this poster was reprinted for Kama Sutra Records, there was the possibility that he might have acquired this poster separately, especially since the “Double-H Press credit was present. I looked for further evidence, and I noticed that this poster had a remnant of a printer’s bull’s eye in the middle of the right edge. Because original posters of FD-43 were printed on the left half of sheets with the cards on the right, it would be impossible for there to be a printer’s bull’s eye along the right edge of an original because the right edge of an original would have been in the middle of the uncut sheet, and printers did not place printer’s bull’s eyes in the middle of uncut sheets. They only placed them along the edges of the sheets. This means that this poster was printed on the right side of a sheet which means it was printed two up (two posters side by side) on a sheet with another copy of FD-43. Only the oddly shaped FD-98 and FD-99 originals were printed on sheets without the cards. Since we already know of printer’s proof sheets with cards which are originals, we know that the posters from this sheet which was printed with two posters side by side has to be a reprint.

Once I had determined that this poster had to be a reprint, I looked for a means of distinguishing it from the original with the Double-H credit. At that point I found that the paper stocks were different, that the originals floresced or glowed under black light, and this reprint did not. I did not use the printer’s bull’s eye remnant as a distinguishing characteristic because the poster was printed two up on a sheet, and the posters on the left half of the sheet would not have this printer’s bull’s eye remnant in the middle of the right edge.

 


 

Under FD-44-OP-1 Delete:

In place of the deletion add: Add "*" before "FD-44-OP-1"

Under FD-44-RP-2 Delete the text and replace with: "The reprint measures 20 1/4" long."

Add: "*" Before "FD-44-RP-2"

At the bottom of the page add: "*This error was discovered by Jacaeber Kastor."


After FD-45-PP-3 add:
FD-45-PP-4       In 2011 a pirate selling on www.amazon.com bootlegged this poster. The stock
    used was slick and glossy. A white border not on the original was added. The
    distinguishing characteristic is its smaller size.  12 “ x 18”    

Under FD-46 change the text to read:

FD-46-OP-1    The original printing of this poster was done on three stocks of paper.  All three match the variations of postcards.  Color shadings vary within press runs but three groups are apparent.  None of the three originals have the mark described under FD-46-RP-3. One paper stock was thin, only .0055”, and glossy. 
    14 5/32” x 20 1/64”    
FD-46-OP-2    The second original was on a more porous stock similar to vellum.  This took the ink much differently than FD-46-OP-1. This one is .0065” thick.
    14 3/32” x 20”    
FD-46-RP-3    The reprint was done on index similar to that used on many later Family Dog posters.  This stock is .0075” thick. The reprint has a very faint black line beginning 1/2” above the upper right point of the star in the upper left corner of the poster. (If the star was a clock, this point is at two o’clock.). This line curves slightly, rises a bit from left to right and is about 5/8” long.
    14 5/32” x 20 1/64”
FD-46-RP-4    In 2009 it was discovered that the variant thought to be a separate printing was not. Accordingly this listing is deleted. The unusual color of the stock was due to damage. The size difference probably was due to the reprint being printed two up (two posters side by side), and the cutter being set so that the cut in the middle was closer to one side than the other. The proof that this poster is part of the same printing is that it has common printing zits from dirt on the printing plate as copies of FD-46-RP-3.
FD-46-OP-5    In 2009 I learned that some copies of the original poster were printed on even thinner stock than FD-46-OP-1. This stock is very thin, only .0045” thick and glossy like  FD-46-OP-1.
FD-46-OPC-A    “Place stamp here” reverse, same stock as FD-46-OP-1. 5 1/64” x 7”   
FD-46-OPC-B    “Place stamp here” reverse, same stock as FD-46-OP-2. 5” x 6 31/32”
FD-46-OPC-C    Bulk mail permit reverse, same stock as FD-46-OP-1. 5 1/32” x 6 31/32”   
FD-46-OPC-D    Bulk mail permit reverse, same stock as FD-46-OP-2.     
FD-46-OPC-E    Some copies of FD-46-OPC-C were mechanically addressed and sent to people on the mailing list.     
FD-46-OPC-F    Some copies of FD-46-OPC-D were mechanically addressed and sent to people on the mailing list.
FD-46-OPC-G   “Place stamp here” reverse, same stock as FD-46-OP-5. 4 63/64” x 6 61/64”
   
Change the notes to read:
F. D. 46 Dance of the Five Moons

This poster is red, green and red over blue on a blue background. The central image is made
up of five circles each with a face in profile in it. They are surrounded by stars. On his last
several posters Victor Moscoso had been experimenting with a type of lettering that slanted
slightly to the left and widened towards the bottom which was rounded. The lettering on this
poster is one of Moscoso's mature, signature alphabets which continues to be seen today in a
wide variety of places, especially in advertising. Unfortunately he rarely if ever is given credit
for originating this design. Although the printers of the early Bill Graham series posters often
changed paper stocks during the press run of originals, this was not common in the Family
Dog series, but it did happen in this case. The original printing of this poster as well as the
postcard appear on three different paper stocks.

 

Under FD-49 change posters to read

FD-49-OP-1        Printing records indicate this image was printed multiple times.  Unfortunately postcards including addressed mailers vary considerably from light to dark blue and light to dark orange.  Paper stocks vary in thickness as well.  In 1998 a distinguishing characteristic between FD-49-OP-1 and FD-49 reprints was discovered by Jacaeber Kastor. The original does not have the small line in the blue margin described under FD-49-RP-2 . 14” x 19 63/64”

FD-49-RP-2      On all the reprints of FD-49 there is a small, horizontal line in the blue border above the “ER” in “KEPLER’S” in the ticket outlets strip. This line is only a few thousandths of an inch wide by 1/8” long. In 2007 it was determined that there were a total of three separate reprints. As fate would have it the one whose dimensions are listed here probably is the last printing. It is characterized by a blue which is lighter than medium blue. All the others are medium blue or darker. This is also the only one of the reprints which probably was not printed two up alongside FD-59, so there is no reprint of FD-59 which is parallel  to this FD-49. The back does not turn gray or lavender under blacklight
13 61/64” x 20 5/64” 

FD-49-RP-3      This reprint was printed two up on the same sheet (alongside) a reprint of FD-59. This means that paper stocks and colors are the same on that reprint and this one. This reprint is substantially wider than the other two reprints of FD-49 so the width will be the distinguishing characteristic.
14 23/64” x 20 1/16”

FD-49-RP-4      This reprint was printed two up on the same sheet side by side with a reprint of FD-59. The colors and paper stock match those of that FD-59. The distinguishing characteristic of this poster is that the stock will turn gray or lavender under black light. The light blue version will not. The blue of this poster is darker than medium blue. 13 61/64” x 19 61/64”

 

 


 
 

This entry replaces any previous FD-50 entry.
 
 FD-50   Break on Through to the 
 Other Side 
3/3 & 3/4/67  Avalon Ballroom
Victor Moscoso Country Joe and the Fish 
Sparrow 
Doors

  Under FD-50-OP-1 change 14 32/32” to 14 3/32”

                     FD-50-OP-1* The original printing of this poster has a ticket outlets
                    strip in green. A proof sheet exists which shows the postcards with a
                    white strip and a poster with a green strip. Since cards were not
                    reprinted, the original has a green strip. Since FD-50-RP-7 discovered
                    in 2002 also has a green ticket outlets strip, it must be noted that
                    FD-50-OP-1 has a small (1/64") black spot near the top of the left
                    portion of the second "R" in "Sparrow" just under the middle of the
                    right leg of the "H" in "the." 14 32/32" x 19 49/64"

                    FD-50-RP-2 The second printing, a reprint, has the ticket outlets strip
                    in white. A substantial number of copies of this printing have a mostly
                    horizontal printing flaw across "Sparrow." 14 1/32" x 19 31/32"

                    FD-50-RP-3 A variant exists which has the ticket outlets strip
                    replaced with "Printed by Offset in Three Colors on International
                    Paper’s Springhill ® Whitetag, Basis 100." A short essay about
                    printing technique and the life of Victor Moscoso appears on the
                    reverse of this printing. "No. 50-1" appears in the lower left corner.

                    FD-50-RP-4 This variant has a blank ticket outlets strip. A substantial
                    number of copies of this printing have a mostly horizontal printing
                    flaw across "Sparrow." This variant was printed on two different paper stocks. One has a woven or "rows" texture on the back and does not glow or floresce on the back under black light. It turns an off white. The other does not have a woven or "rows texture on the back. This variant turns gray on the back under black light. 14 1/32" x 19 31/32"

                    FD-50-RP-5 In 1990 Pyramid Books in England printed this image.
                    Paper stock is thick and glossy. The top half inch of the image is
                    missing. In 1997 it was learned that this was a properly licensed
                    reprint, not a pirate. 11 57/64" x 16 35/64"

                    FD-50-RP-6 Another variant exists which has the ticket outlets strip
                    replaced with "Printed by Offset in Three Colors on International
                    Paper’s Springhill R Whitetag, Basis 100." A short essay about
                    printing technique and the life of Victor Moscoso appears on the
                    reverse. "No.50-1" does not appear in the lower left corner.

                    FD-50-RP-7* In 2002 a printer’s proof sheet was discovered with two
                    posters printed side by side. These both have a green ticket outlets
                    strip. This newly discovered reprint may be distinguished from
                    FD-50-OP-1 because copies of FD-50-RP-7 do not have the small
                    black dot described under FD-50-OP-1. Colors do differ from
                    FD-50-OP-1, especially the blue which is much lighter on FD-50-RP-7,
                    but the presence or absence of the dot is the distinguishing factor.

FD-50-RP-8  In 2007 I located a copy of the Kama Sutra Records reprint of this poster. It turned out to be identical to the variant of FD-50-RP-4 which was on stock which turned gray on the back under black light, the variant which did not have a woven or "rows" texture on the back. See "The Mystery of the Capitol Records and Kama Sutra Records Reprints" in the Table of Contents.

                    FD-50-OPC-A The ticket outlets strip is white on both printing
                    variants of the postcard. "Place stamp here" is on one reverse. 5 1/64" x
                    6 61/64"

                    FD-50-OPC-B The other reverse has the bulk mail permit. 4 63/64" x
                    6 63/64"

                    FD-50-OPC-C Some copies of FD-50-OPC-B were mechanically
                    addressed and sent to people on the mailing list.

*Since the early 1980’s serious scholars of this material have been aware that in 1967
Capitol Records ordered 100,000 posters from the Family Dog, 5,000 each of 20 images.
These were shipped directly from the printer to Capitol Records. The evidence for this is
the existence of a printer’s invoice describing this sale. Capitol Records then distributed
these posters to record stores across the country. They also advertised the set of 20
posters in music magazines. Since these posters were shipped directly from the printer
to Capitol Records, no copies of these posters were in the Family Dog inventory when
the Family Dog went out of business and sold its remaining inventory to Postermat.
Accordingly these have been very difficult to locate and document. One of the last
missing Capitol Records variants has been the FD-50. In 2002 we found out why we
had been unable to document this variant. It simply looked too much like the original to
be noticed.

Fortunately in 2002 Bill Jacobs of California discovered a printer’s proof of two FD-50
Posters printed side by side. Since all California Litho Plate Family Dog originals except
the unusually shaped FD-98 and FD-99 were printed on the same sheets as cards which,
according to employees of California Litho Plate were never reprinted, it was clear that
this was a proof sheet of the long sought Capitol Records reprint. Mr. Jacobs was kind
enough to bring this proof sheet to the October 5, 2002 TRPS (The Rock Poster Society)
Swap Meet where it was carefully examined and compared to an original proof sheet
which once had been the property of the artist, Victor Moscoso, who had taken it home
from the printer’s before the concerts. Present at that time and assisting me in this
examination were Jacaeber Kastor and Dennis King as well as several other serious
scholars of this material. Mr. Kastor and I agreed that the best distinguishing
characteristic was the presence or absence of the dot mentioned under FD-50-OP-1. Mr.
Dennis King felt that although the dot did distinguish between the two printings, he
preferred a different distinction involving the Family Dog logo. Those interested in his
distinction should contact him directly.
I wish to thank Mr. Jacobs for discovering this variant and bringing it with him to the
Swap Meet so we could all study it and Mr. Dennis King for recognizing the importance
of this proof sheet and speaking to Mr. Jacobs about bringing it to the Swap Meet where
it could be studied.

F. D. 50 Break on Through to the Other Side This poster is several shades of green, red
and blue. The central image is a photograph of a human face seen from the bridge of the
nose up. A series of wavy lines emanates from the middle of the forehead giving the
appearance of the radiation of energy. The caption "Break on Through to the Other Side"
is written above the face in reference to the Doors song with that title. The four Doors
posters in the Family Dog series by Victor Moscoso are among the most popular
psychedelic posters both because they are very beautiful and because they are for
concerts by the Doors.
 
 
 

Under FD-51 Change posters to read:

FD-51-OP-1       In 2007 it was determined that there were two printings of FD-51 with a dark pink Family Dog logo. The original dark pink logo poster is substantially wider than the dark pink logo reprint. The black of the original is much darker and more nearly black than that of the dark pink logo reprint, but the width should be used as the distinguishing factor. 14 17/64” x 20 1/64

FD-51-RP-2       A reprint with a white Family Dog logo exists. 14 3/64” x 19 61/64”

FD-51-PP-3       In 2006 a pirate printer offered a bootleg of this image on a website which has since been discontinued. The image of this bootleg is much larger than that of the original. 18 29/32” x 24”

FD-51-RP-4       This dark pink logo reprint is much narrower than the dark pink logo original. The black of this variant is more of a dark gray than a black.
14” x 20 1/64”

 


Under FD-52-OP-1 and FD-52-RP-2 add "It is on uncoated index."

After FD-52-RP-2 add "FD-52-RP-3 This variant is on semi glossy stock."

Under FD-53 Artist add: “Fred Roth (Photographer)”

Under FD-54 change FD-54-OP-1, FD-54-RP-2 and FD-54-RP-3 to read:

FD-54-OP-1    The original printing is  c.14 5/16" wide or wider. The original has a dot similar to that mentioned under FD-54-RP-2. The distinguishing factor between FD-54-OP-1 and FD-54-RP-2 is that FD-54-OP-1 is substantially wider than FD-54-RP-2. 14 27/64” x 20 3/64”

FD-54-RP-2    The second printing, a reprint, is c. 14 1/8" wide or narrower.  This reprint has a  small, reddish dot located in the left margin outside the blue double border
    1 7/8” below the bottom of the “S” in “Sunday.” This dot does not appear on FD-54-RP-3.  13 31/32” x 19 29/32”

FD-54-RP-3    In 2008 the Kama Sutra Records reprint was discovered. It is a separate printing from FD-54-RP-2. The colors are different from either FD-54-OP-1 or
    FD-54-RP-2. There are no common printing zits despite there being quite a few on each printing. This printing may be distinguished by the fact that it is narrower than 14 1/8” wide and does not have the dot described under
    FD-54-RP-2. 13 31/32” x 19 31/32”

 


<>Change FD-55 posters to read:

FD-55-OP-1    Because of the relative similarity of posters and postcards it is difficult to describe differences between the two printings of this poster, but a proof                             sheet of FD-55 and FD-57 exists, and the FD-57 on this sheet is definitely FD-57-RP-2,  so it is clear there were two printings of FD-55.  In 2004                         it was discovered that the backs of original printing posters and cards of  FD-55 floresce or glow under black light. There is some variation in color                         among the originals. The only reliable distinction between originals and reprints is this glow under black light by the originals. 14” x 20 1/16”
FD-55-RP-2    The backs of reprints of FD-55 do not glow under black light.

Under FD-56 change OP-1 and RP-2  and FD-56-RP-3 to read

 

FD-56-OP-1*       The best distinction between the original and the reprints of this poster is the absence of small red printing flaws on the originals which are present on FD-56-RP-2 and the absence  on originals of the blue dot which is present on both FD-56-RP-2 and FD-56-RP-3. 14 1/32” x 20 1/64”

FD-56-RP-2* On this reprint there are small, fine horizontal red lines (printing flaws) in the right margin around and below the lower right edge of the photograph. Some copies have more of these flaws, and some have less, but all these reprints have some. These reprints also have the blue dot described under FD-56-RP-3. 13 59/64” x 19 31/32”

FD-56-RP-3* In 2008 the Kama Sutra Records reprint was discovered. It is a separate printing from FD-56-RP-2. It does not have the red print flaws that are described under FD-56-RP-2. It does have a small blue dot located as follows: First find the period (.) in “Alchemical Co.” Then find the “2” in “94102,” the zip code in the Family Dog address. Draw an imaginary vertical line below the period and another horizontal one to the right of the bottom of the “2.” The location of the blue dot, if it is present, will be where those two imaginary lines meet. 13 63/64” x 20 3/64”

Under FD-56 notes add

 

Phil Cushway has very rightly said that if I change anything significant in this Guide at this late date (2008), I should include the evidence which supports this change. Since the new definitions of Family Dog 56 posters narrow the definition of the original, I believe it is appropriate to explain why this has been done.

Originally I had thought that there were only two printings of this poster. These were FD-56-OP-1 and the one listed as FD-56-RP-2 which was described as having the small red printing flaws in the right margin below the photograph. There were numerous copies of what now is clearly a third printing (FD-56-RP-3) in the San Francisco Bay Area in the inventory of the Family Dog which were sold to Ben Friedman of Postermat in 1968, but I had not recognized them as a separate printing because they were so similar to FD-56-OP-1. While FD-56-RP-2 was very different in color from FD-56-OP-1, FD-56-RP-3 was nearly identical in color to FD-56-OP-1, and I thought the minor differences were variations within a press run.

Further compounding this problem was the fact that when, at the suggestion of Jacaeber Kastor, experts began examining these posters for the presence or absence of “rows” or woven texture on the paper stocks, it was clear that both FD-56-OP-1 and what is now FD-56-RP-3 were printed on the “rows” or woven side of paper stock with one side “rows” or woven in texture and the other side smooth.  I considered this so unusual that the likelihood that two separate printings of a poster done half a year or more apart were both printed in this way was so small that these had to be the same printing.

Then in 2008 the Kama Sutra Records reprint showed up. Printing records clearly indicated it was printed at least six months after the shows, but there it was, printed on stock with “rows” or woven texture on the side of the printing. The cards, including the mailers, were printed on the “rows” or woven texture side of stock with one side “rows” or woven texture and the other side smooth. But the Kama Sutra Records printing had to be a reprint and so did any others that matched it, but the problem was that there was no immediately apparent difference between it and the postcards, and this meant the originals which matched the postcards were on that type of stock, too.

 Jacaeber Kastor had said that there was a large and elaborate print flaw between the upper portions of the “H” and the “A” in “Charlatans” which only appeared on a small number of copies of FD-56 which he had seen, and he took that as his signifier for originals. I saw these posters as originals, but I would not accept this print flaw as a signifier because I had seen copies of FD-56 with only very small versions of this print flaw. I reasoned that this print flaw developed and got worse as the press run continued, and that early in the press run this flaw was not present at all so there were originals without it. Accordingly I stayed with the small red print flaws on FD-56-RP-2 as the only necessary signifier distinguishing between two and only two printings. Jacaeber Kastor correctly identified that there were three printings, but by using the print flaw between the “H” and the “A” of “Charlatans” as a signifier for the original, he eliminated legitimate originals from his listing of originals.

Since I already knew that the postcard was on “rows” or woven texture stock with the image on the “rows” or woven texture side, I had to find some other means of using the postcard to document the difference between the original FD-56-OP-1 and the Kama Sutra Records reprint FD-56-RP-3. I took out two copies of the poster which I had obtained in the late 1960s from people who had gone to many of the shows and whose collections had included mostly originals. This did not mean these were definitely originals, but it did mean it was likely they were. One had the print flaw between the “H” and the “A” in “Charlatans,” and the other did not.

I held the backs of my three postcards and one mailer under a black light, and all had an identical mild white floresence. I did the same with the two posters I thought were likely to be originals. Both of these matched the mild white floresence of the postcards and mailer under black light. I then tried the same comparison on two posters which had been bought in the 1970s from Ben Friedman’s Postermat which came from the Family Dog inventory as well as on the Kama Sutra Records reprint. These all matched each other in turning purple/gray under black light. This was a good start, but only two copies of each poster as well as the Kama Sutra Records reprint and three cards was not enough of a sample to be definitive.

I then went to Wolfgangsvault where I checked these patterns against a large number of postcards and posters. The three posters in the archive of Jacaeber Kastor, which now belongs to Wolfgangsvault, which Mr. Kastor had thought were originals, all matched the postcards by florescing white. The posters in the Wolfgangsvault inventory which were not from the

FD-56-RP-2 printing, turned one of two similar shades of purple/gray under black light. All the postcards in the Wolfgangsvault inventory matched mine in florescing mild white under black light. It was now clear that the Kama Sutra Records printing had been half of a ten thousand print run half of which had gone directly to Kama Sutra Records and half of which had gone to the Family Dog’s own inventory.

At this point I considered the possibility of using the common floresence of the postcards and the originals as the distinguishing criterion, because this and the obviously different floresence of the Kama Sutra Records reprint was the evidence that led me to my conclusion, but this would have required a reader of this Guide to have a black light and a postcard in addition to a poster in order to tell what his/her poster was. I have resisted using criteria generating this need for multiple items because if it is at all possible, I think this Guide should be able to tell a collector how to figure out what an item is using only one item.

At Wolfgangsvault I had six different originals and a pile of reprints sorted by white or purple/gray floresence on the back. This was, I hoped, enough to find some mark which would be on one or the other group consistently so it could be used to distinguish the groups which had already been accurately separated by whether they matched or did not match the floresence of the postcard.

Grant Feichtmeir of Wolfgangsvault (who by now in 2008 is very knowledgeable about this material) and I began looking at several FD-56-RP-3 reprints along with the originals. We noticed several transitory red printing flaws but eventually focused on several blue dots. Eventually we discovered the one in the lower right corner which I describe under FD-56-RP-3. This dot was clearly a mark on the plate because it appeared on every copy of FD-56-RP-3 which turned purple/gray under black light as well as all the copies of FD-56-RP-2, but it did not appear on any of the copies of FD-56-OP-1. At this point we agreed that the blue dot would be the means by which we would distinguish FD-56-OP-1 from FD-56-RP-3.

I hope that the readers of this Guide will find this explanation  adequate to justify this change in the Guide.  If anyone has any questions about this, please email me at the  address  on the title page of this  Guide.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


Under FD-57 acts change "Maji" to "Haji"."

Change FD-57-OP-1 and FD-57-RP-2 and FD-57-OPC-A to read
 


Under FD-59-RP-2 add: "The back of this variant will turn gray or bright lavender under blacklight. It was printed two up on a sheet with FD-49-RP-4."
Under FD-59-RP-3 add: "The back of this variant will not turn gray or bright lavender under blacklight. It was printed two up on a sheet with FD-49-RP-3."

Under FD-60 change FD-60-OP-1 and FD-60-RP-2 to read

FD-60-OP-1 On the original the white area described under FD-60-RP-2 is filled with pale brown ink. 14 1/64" x 20"

FD-60-RP-2 Below the word "ROOM" on the right side of the photo is a heart shaped design with an arrowhead shaped tail. This tail is under the "M" in "ROOM." On the reprint there is a white area along the top edge of the arrowhead shaped tail. This area is c. 1/2" long by c. 1/32" wide. 14 3/64" x
 20 1/32"

Change FD-60-RP-3 to read:

FD-60-RP-3          In 2007 I located a copy of the Kama Sutra Records reprint of this poster. It turned out to be identical to FD-60-RP-2. See “The Mystery of Capitol Records and Kama Sutra Records Reprints” in the Table of Contents.

 

 

Delete all of FD-61 descriptions and replace with:

The good news is that after years of confusion, the mystery of FD-61 has, at last, been resolved.
The bad news is that most of what  has been in this guide about FD-61 before 2003 has been
wrong. My fellow scholar of this material, Jacaeber Kastor of Psychedelic Solution in New York
City, was only one third wrong, much better than me.

For years we have known that FD-61 was one of the few remaining images which we really did
not have correctly described, and in January 2003 we began exchanging emails seeking to figure
out what the truth is about this difficult image. Eventually we spent an hour and a half on the
phone with each other and with a group of posters and cards in front of us, and as we exchanged
insights, we finally were able to achieve accurate answers to our questions.

I believe that since many people rely on this guide, readers are entitled to more than just a
correction of a mistake. They are entitled to an explanation of why something was wrong and
why the new information is correct.  A description of the process of how the new conclusions
were reached will be found following the entry for this number.
 
 

    FD-61-OP-1 The original is identified by a horizontal band 1/8” wide running parallel to,
    below and touching the lowest pink border. This band in the blue area is a very faintly
    darker shade of blue than all the other blue of the poster. This band is most   visible
    beginning just above the “s” in “outlets” at the bottom and running to the left edge of the
    paper. There is also a similar band 1/16” wide and 1 1/2” long or longer extending
    vertically (at a right angle) upward from the first band in the left margin. It is necessary
    to search very carefully under very good light in order to find this band. Holding the
    poster at varying oblique angles can help. Another characteristic of this poster is a small
    dot immediately to the left of the “M” in “Moscoso.” Stock of this printing varies from
    .007” to .008” 14” x 20”

    FD-61-RP-2 The second printing does have the dot but not the band described under
    FD-61-OP-1. Stock also varies in thickness and texture. At least two separate stocks are
    known to exist for this printing. 14 1/64” x 20 1/16”

    FD-61-RP-3 This printing does not have the dot or the band described under FD-61-OP-1.

    FD-61-OPC-A This card has a “place stamp here” reverse. There is a faint darkening of
    the blue in a vertical band 1/8” wide down the card beginning above the “E” in “The
    Doors.”

    FD-61-OPC-B This card has a bulk mail permit reverse and the same band described
    under FD-61-OPC-A

    FD-61-OPC-C      Some copies of FD-61-OPC-B  were mechanically addressed and sent to
    people on the mailing list.

    FD-61-OPC-D  This card has a “place stamp here” reverse but no band as described under
    FD-61-OPC-A.

    FD-61-OPC-E      This card has a bulk mail permit reverse but no band as described under
    FD-61-OPC-A.

    FD-61-OPC-F       Some copies of FD-61-OPC-E were mechanically addressed and sent to
    people on the mailing list.

The process by which the new descriptions of FD-61 were arrived at is as follows:

The old signifier for FD-61, the difference between pure orange and reddish orange was always
considered problematic. Most of the readers of this guide found it useless because the semantics
of color are different from person to person. Many people even see color differently from eye to
eye (Try looking at something carefully with one eye shut. Then change eyes. Many people will
recognize subtle differences in color.). Furthermore experiments have shown that different
cultures describe color differently. If you take a color band tapering gradually between blue and
green and ask a person born and raised in Tokyo where the color stops being blue and starts
being green, that person will pick a different place along the band than a person born and raised
in New York City. Also I once was on a glacier and asked a dozen people whether  a particular
point on the glacier was blue or green, I got seven “blue” answers and five “greens.”

For this reason several people have looked very closely at FD-61 posters to find some marking
which would work. In early 2003 I finally noticed the band described under the new listing for
FD-61-OP-1. I examined it on several dozen copies, both those I thought were originals by color
and those I thought were reprints by color. All of those I  thought were reprints had the band,
and all those I thought were originals did not have it. I then sent this information to Jacaeber
Kastor of Psychedelic Solution in New York City. He studied many more copies and agreed it was
a workable signifier, but he believed I had it backwards. According to him it was the originals
which had the band. We then spent an hour and a half on the phone with a pile of copies of this
poster in front of each of us, and he noticed that the band does not disappear to the right of the
“S” in “Outlets.” It only becomes more faint. It actually runs all the way across the poster to the
right edge.

He then had the excellent insight that if he was right and the band was only on originals and ran
all the way to the edge of the poster, it would appear on two out of every six postcards because
the cards had been printed so that they were on the same double sheet with the original poster,
one poster with six cards. We both got out a number of cards, and we were both able to find
cards with the band running exactly where it should be according to his theory. This
demonstrated conclusively that those posters with the band are originals, those without are
reprints. In order to double check this I called Paul Getchell, another serious scholar of this
material, who owns a copy of the uncut printer’s proofsheet of FD-61 with the cards. I asked him
to look for the band, and he was able to find the band running all the way across the poster
horizontally and vertically down the lowest two cards on the sheet.  The cards on this sheet are
rotated 90 degrees from the poster so a horizontal line on the poster would be vertical on the
cards.

This leads to the question of how I managed to get the original and the reprint reversed for all
these years. I had used the logic used on most of the Family Dog items from this period, that
since the cards were never reprinted, the original poster was the one which matched the cards.
In this case for unknown reasons, the cards and posters do not match. Paul Getchell told me that
one of the things which is interesting about the proofsheet which he has is that the orange is
much darker and more reddish on the side/half of the postcards than it is on the side/half of the
poster. The darker, more reddish postcards more closely match the poster reprint which was done
later on a double sheet printed side by side with a poster of FD-66. Mr. Kastor has a photograph
of the printing plate of this item so we know it was printed this way. Further linking
FD-61-RP-2 to FD-66-RP-2 is the fact that the vertical bars/lines which appear in the red on that
poster also appear in the upper left red area of FD-66-RP-2 also appear in the upper left blue
area of FD-61-RP-2.

Mr. Kastor also showed me copies of another poster which is a third printing of FD-61 which does
not have the darker blue band and is missing the small dot which appears immediately to the left
of  the “Moscoso”  signature in the plate on FD-61-OP-1 and FD-61-RP-2. He believes, and I am
inclined to agree, that this poster was printed later, probably two up with two copies of the same
image.

I apologize to the buyers of this guide for this error which is probably the worst in this  guide
which has been discovered up to this point. I can only say that this is a fluid scholarship with new
discoveries made regularly, and those of us who study it try our best to see the information we
share with others is as accurate as possible.

Under FD-62 change posters to read:

FD-62-OP-1          In 2007 it was discovered that this poster was printed twice and that there are two variants of the original. Both variants of the original have a small  c. 1/64” blue dot in the right margin level with the right arm of the “Y” in the Family Dog logo. Both variants are printed on “rows” or “woven” textured stock. This variant has the rows pattern on the front of the poster. 14 1/32” x 20 1/64”

FD-62-OP-2       This variant with the blue dot described above has the rows pattern on the back of the poster. 14” x 19 31/32”

FD-62-RP-3       The reprint does not have the blue dot described above and is on stock which does not have a rows pattern on either side.  13 31/32” x 19 31/32”

FD-62-OPC-A This card has a “place stamp here” reverse. 4 63/64” x 7”

FD-62-OPC-B This card has a bulk rate permit reverse. 4 63/64” x 6 31/32”

FD-62-OPC-C Some copies of FD-62-OPC-B were mechanically addressed and sent to people on the mailing list. 

Under FD-62 notes add:

F. D. 62 Sutter's Mill

 In 2007 Phil Cushway, owner of Artrock, discovered that he owned two proof sheets of this poster, one with cards alongside the poster which was the original and
one printed side by side with FD-58, obviously a reprint. He studied these two sheets carefully and noticed that the original had the blue dot described above, and the reprint did not. In order to prove that the dot was not just a flaw on this copy but on the whole run, several hundred posters were sorted by dot/no dot and then sorted by stock. All copies with the dot were on one stock and all copies without the dot were on the other. This proved the dot was a reliable signifier for the original. Some cards have rows pattern on the front, some on the back.


Change FD-63 text to read:

FD-63-OP-1    The original is on stock with a tan reverse. This tan stock has a “rows” or woven texture on the reverse. All postcards are on this stock.
                           14 9/64” x 21 51/64”     
FD-63-RP-2    This reprint is on stock which has an off white reverse. It has a “rows” or woven texture, but its color is very different from FD-63-OP-1. No postcards exist on this stock.
                        13 63/64” x 21 51/64”  
FD-63-RP-3    This reprint is on stock which has a tan reverse, but this tan stock does not have a “rows” or woven texture reverse. It has a random textured reverse. No postcards exist on this
                         stock.  14 3/64” x 21 51/64”    
FD-63-OPC-A    Postcards only exist on the tan stock with the “rows” or woven texture reverse.  This card has a “place stamp here” reverse. 4 15/16” x 6 31/32”     
FD-63-OPC-B    This card has a bulk mail permit reverse.  4 63/64” x 7”
FD-63-OPC-C    Some copies of FD-63-OPC-B were mechanically addressed and sent to people on the mailing list.


Under FD-64 change the entire text to read:


FD-64-OP-1    This poster was printed at least three times. Greens, blues and lavenders all vary substantially sliding in shade from light to medium.  In 2009 Phil Cushway, owner of Artrock, posted a video on You Tube showing both an FD-64 proof sheet with postcards (an original) and an FD-64 proof sheet printed two posters side by side (a reprint). The colors of this reprint proof sheet were similar to those of the original. He pointed out that the poster of the original proof sheet had two characteristics distinguishing it from the posters of the reprint sheet of similar colors. On the original there is a small, 1/32” x 1/64,” slightly darker blue/green dot located in the medium blue background 2 1/2” above the top right corner of the right edge of the “V” in “AVALON.” He also pointed out a small 1/64” white dot located in the green just below and between the two “Ls” in “MILLER.” on the left side of the poster.
14 1/32” x 20 1/32”
FD-64-RP-2    One printing of the poster is on uncoated index but is a much darker blue than the postcard.  It is not possible to say whether this reprinting came before or after FD-64-RP-6 which was discovered in 2009. 14 3/64” x 20”
FD-64-RP-3    This variant of the poster is similar in color to FD-64-RP-2 but instead of being on uncoated index it is on semi glossy stock. 13 61/64” x 19 61/64”
FD-64-RP-4    Pomegranate Press printed an authorized reprint of this image in the 1990’s. A
    Pomegranate Press credit appears on the reverse. 12 15/16” x 14 15/16”
FD-64-PP-5       In 2007 I was shown a copy of this poster which is unlike any of the previous
    copies I have seen. It is on much thicker stock, .0110,” with a different texture
    than any used by California Litho Plate for Family Dog posters. For this and other reasons, I believe this is a pirate/bootleg not authorized by the copyright
    holders. Some detail is lost, especially in the ticket outlets strip but also in parts of the image. It may be identified by thickness alone. The other printings are all less than .0090” thick. It appears to have been printed by offset lithography so it may have been around for years or even decades. 14 7/16” x 20 3/16”
FD-64-RP-6    This reprint does not have the two distinguishing marks listed under
    FD-64-OP-1, but the colors are very similar to the original.
    14 7/64” x 20 3/32”
FD-64-OPC-A    This card has a “place stamp here” reverse.  4 61/64” x 6 31/32”   
FD-64-OPC-B    This card has a bulk mail permit reverse.  4 31/32” x 6 63/64”
FD-64-OPC-C    Some copies of FD-64-OPC-B were mechanically addressed and sent to people on the mailing list.

F. D. 64 Pink Panther

This poster is dark pink, green and a near black produced by blue over green on a blue
background. The central image is the eyes and nose of a cat with two human profiles
superimposed so that each is facing downward, one under each eye of the cat. Careful
observation, particularly in the lettering, shows slight overlap of color intended to create a
three-dimensional effect similar to but not as intense as on No. 53. This is the last of the four
Doors posters by Victor Moscoso in the Family Dog series, and it is much sought-after and
expensive.

In his video of 2009 on You Tube Phil Cushway, owner of Artrock, stated that he thought it
was necessary that whenever I made a substantial change in this Guide, that I should explain the
reasoning process leading to this change. Actually I have already been doing this since 2005.

It would be easy for me to say  that the reason I changed the Guide here is that Phil Cushway
told me to, but because I do not always agree with Mr. Cushway despite the fact that I readily
acknowledge his vast expertise on these posters, I would like to point out that I did extensive
study of FD-64 posters before I changed the Guide.

Not only was it simply obvious that the small, darker blue dot was a plate mark showing
that the originals were printed with a different plate than the lighter blue copies of the poster
which were without this small blue mark, there were several other plate marks on the reprint not
on the original, and there were different degrees of shading to stripping marks in the upper left
corner of each printing.

I was very ably assisted by Grant Feichtmeier in this 2009 research done at Wolfgangs Vault.
Thanks, Grant.

I note in passing that the most recent edition of my Guide stated ,”This poster was printed at
least two and probably three times.” I have long suspected that there was an additional printing,
but the only way that this additional printing could be distinguished was with study of this
repint proof sheet which Mr. Cushway has. I understand he is very busy running his business,
but hopefully now that he has been able to get around to this image, he will have time to go
through more of the printing plates, film and proof sheets he stated in the videos that he has.

All serious collectors of this material look forward to new videos by Mr. Cushway as he goes
through this storehouse of material. Of course, I would be happy to assist him in the study of
this material if he would consent to share it with me, but if he chooses not to do so, I never-
theless am eager to share with the readers of this Guide whatever insights I am able to glean
from the videos he posts.



Under FD-65 add:
FD-65-PP-3   In 2008 a pirate/bootleg of this poster was printed, probably in Australia, and sold on ebay. It copies FD-65-RP-2 and has a yellow border. The bootleg was printed digitally on semi-gloss stock unlike the lawful reprint which was printed on uncoated index. This bootleg can be distinguished by the fact that the white areas are not pure white but are filled with small, colored dots.  14 9/64" x 21 1/8"

Following FD-65 add the following:

In 2001 Mr. Phil Cushway, owner of Artrock, raised the issue of whether or not the distinction made in my guide between FD-65-OP-1 and FD-65-RP-65 was correct. His assertion that it might not be appeared in three sentences which were part of the description of Ebay item 1446507693, a copy of FD-65-RP-2. His words addressing this topic are as follows, " The white border is generally considered to be the first printing, while the yellow border is supposed to be the second printing. While this may be true, ( I was not there to be sure) I do have an uncut proofsheet of white cards and a yellow border poster. Thus, although this is considered to be a second printing poster, there is proof to the contrary with the proofsheet."

Beginning with FD-43 and extending to FD- 86 almost every Family Dog poster was reprinted at least once. The only exceptions appear to be FD-70, FD- 73, and FD-80. FD-82 was probably printed twice, but both printings predate in the show. It was generally Family Dog policy to reprint an item when stock ran low. The three which were not reprinted were among the slowest selling Family Dog posters from the era, and there was an ample supply of them in stock as demonstrated by the fact that there were substantial numbers of them in the inventory when it was acquired by Ben Friedman, owner of the Postermat, who bought the Family Dog poster and postcard inventory not long after the Family Dog went out of business.

During the time when these posters were being published, early collectors were not taking careful notice of the reprints of Family Dog posters between numbers 43 and 86. There was an awareness of earlier, pre-43 reprints because these were, for the most part, properly labeled, but in general the fact that the Family Dog chose to mislabel reprints "-1" seemed to preclude discussion in the '60s. Distinctions like the differences in color tone on many of the posters which are obvious to us now were initially ignored. The exception to this was FD-65. The white versus yellow distinction was so drastic it was impossible to ignore.

I generally have avoided citing my own experiences as sources of information, but in this case I will make an exception.

Mr. Cushway repeatedly has stated, "I wasn't there so I don't really know for sure." This once I choose to say, "I was there. I do know." By the time of the FD-65 concert I knew at least a dozen other collectors, most of whom I had met either from ads I had run in underground newspapers or from encounters on Telegraph Avenue while trading postcards carried in cigar boxes. There was quite a bit of comradery as well as trading, and we exchanged information freely. When the yellow bordered FD- 65 appeared, it was long after the show. I was very curious about it, and I remember asking everyone I knew who was collecting the posters if they had seen a yellow bordered one at the time of the show. They all said they had not seen it until it began being sold in poster shops months after the show. Everyone remarked that the only ones they had seen at the time of the concert were the white bordered ones, and only white bordered ones appeared in runs of originals collected from the people who had gotten their posters attending the concerts. It was the recognizably different yellow bordered FD- 65 that eventually led collectors to speculate that the Family Dog might be reprinting posters after number 43 without properly designating them as they had before number 43. In fact, this was what was happening.

This brings us to the prooofsheet mentioned by Mr. Cushway. I have seen this proofsheet, and there is no doubt it is as he describes it, six white bordered cards alongside a yellow bordered poster. Although it is well established that no yellow bordered posters were distributed before the show, merely relying on this avoids the issue of the existence of Mr. Cushway's proofsheet which almost certainly was printed prior to the show because it includes cards. As I have written in several places, cards apparently were not reprinted by the Family Dog, but the answer here is simple and is confirmed by a variety of other proofsheets, some of them owned by Mr. Cushway. The artists who created these posters liked to experiment, and they did so often. The artists themselves state this. Large numbers of one of a kind printings of these posters exist, experiments with colors which the artists decided they did not want to use or they were told they could not use because of some additional expense. Rick Griffin apparently liked
the idea of this poster with the yellow background and border. One was printed before the show as an experiment, but it was not chosen as the final original format. Later when it came time reprint this poster, Rick’s preference for a yellow border was accepted. This is the most logical
explanation considering that no yellow bordered posters were distributed before the show and none appeared until months after the show. Rather simply put, if the Family Dog had printed substantial quantities of yellow bordered posters prior to the show, they would have distributed them. This is also suggested by the fact that Rick’s posters were very popular and that all his other Family Dog numbered images were reprinted. This image was quite popular, and it was from the time when the posters before and after it were reprinted so it would be highly unlikely it was not reprinted. The above evidence points very strongly to two printings of FD-65, a white bordered original and a yellow bordered reprint.

One additional confirmation of this which testifies to the level of alertness of the late 1960s collectors is that when Family Dog Number 121 appeared in two substantially different color variants, both before the show, I remember that collectors were aware of both variants within a week or two after the concert. The same would have been the case if substantially different color variants of FD-65 had been distributed before the show. Everyone involved would have wanted copies of both versions in the same way they wanted both versions of FD-121.

Under FD-66 change "Schwal" to "Schwall."

Under FD-66-OP-1 change the text to read:
 
FD-66-OP-1  This poster was printed twice. The original printing matches the postcard and does not have the lines described under BG-66-RP-2.
FD-66-RP-2 In 1999 a reprint of this image done in 1967 or 1968 was discovered. The reprintis a lighter green and a lighter red than the original. It does not match the postcard.
Paper dimensions, length, width and thickness are very close to identical with the original. When viewed at an oblique angle the upper left corner of the reprint seems to have five or six faint vertical red lines about 3/32" wide separated by red lines of similar width that are very faintly different in color from the background red. These extend from the top edge to the green border of the image. This is one of the few posters where it might not be a bad idea to have a postcard handy to check whether an item is an original or a reprint. 
FD-66-OPC-A This card has a "place stamp here" reverse.
FD-66-OPC-B This card has a bulk rate permit reverse.
FD-66-OPC-C Some copies of FD-66-OPC-B were mechanically addressed and sent to people on the mailing list.

Following FD-66 add the following:

In 2001 Phil Cushway, the owner of Artrock, wrote a one page essay claiming that the distinguishing feature used in my Guide to tell the difference between FD-66-OP-1
and FD-66-OP-2 was incorrect. He published this essay on Ebay along with the description of Ebay item No. 1446507650 which was a copy of Family Dog No. 66, the "Strongman." While
Mr. Cushway expressed a number of general reservations about my Guide which are discussed in a new part of the introduction to my Guide (see table of contents: Response to Concerns Expressed by Phil Cushway), I will address here only the reasons why I believe he is incorrect in his contention that either there is only one printing of this poster or there is more than one printing but they are indistinguishable.

Since I seek to be fair in a scholarly refutation of Mr. Cushway's thesis, I will quote in full his paragraph from Ebay on FD-66. It appeared exactly as follows:

"I have a great deal of issue’s of the now "current" (this year's) model. [The reference is to the latest edition of my Guide.] That in 1999 it was discovered that these were in fact 2 printings of this poster and that they can be distinguished by the presence of small, faint green lines that extend for the image to the top of the poster along the left hand side. While it may be true that there were 2 printings of this poster, (having not been there, I cannot say for certain anyway). This is simply not a satisfactory explanation of these lines or their origins or differences in a "printing". The more likely explanation is this - When these posters were being printed, sometimes the image would be "offset" and in fact, this is what probably happened here. The lines simply "ghosted" here; the printer, to fix this recurring and normal happening simply wipe down the plate so that, presto, the "ghosted" lines simply disappear. Furthermore, this argument is what happened when I examined a bunch of these posters from the same pack - low and behold, when found, the posters exhibited varying ghosting and posters with the absence of ghosting all within the same bundle. Because of these reasons, I am not going to separate these out. If you win the bid for one of these it might or might not have the "ghosted lines". If you insist that only the poster with out these offending lines is the first, don't bid on this one first, where you might or might not get it. Buy instead from someone else (who by the way most likely got it form me anyway). Phil"

Mr. Cushway's error in quoting my Guide and describing the signifier as "green lines" rather than red ones can be overlooked, but his failure to address the real difference between the two printings, the substantial differences in all the colors, indicates he has not seriously contested the validity of my assertion that there are two printings of FD-66. Since differences in color are not useful distinctions when a person using my Guide has only one item available, because verbal descriptions of such color distinctions are not possible, it is necessary to look for specific markings; plate scratches, ghosting etc. which appear on one printing and not another. These marks are not evidence of more than one printing, and Mr. Cushway's challenge to their use as signifiers is a challenge to a strawman, apparently successful but proving nothing. What
makes it clear that there were two printings of this poster is that there are clear and distinct groupings of these posters which can be separated consistently and reliably by colors. Not only can they be separated by colors, there are no gradations of color running between the two as there are, for example, on FD-68 in which case it was necessary to designate all copies as originals. Further clarifying the distinction between the two printings is the fact that all known postcards including mailers sent out by the Family Dog before the FD-66 concert match one of the color groupings, and no known postcards match the other. Although it is very difficult to prove the negative "The Family Dog never reprinted postcards," the printing records which are widely distributed among the scholars of this material make no reference to the reprinting of
postcards, and all known reprint plates are of posters printed two side-by-side without postcards.

Furthermore Mr. Cushway's assertion that he has packages of these posters which include copies with no ghosting next to ones with ghosting (with the faint red lines), does not prove his contention that my Guide is incorrect. His original source of supply was the vast inventory of Ben Friedman's Postermat. Friedman was notorious for mixing piles of posters. When he, Friedman, bought the Family Dog inventory in the late 1960s, this inventory included large numbers of both originals and reprints which were already intermingled. Friedman further added to this chaos by putting all posters of a given number on the same rack in his warehouse which I toured on a number of occasions as early as the early 1970s.

Put simply, there are no known copies of the darker red version of FD-66 which have the red lines. If there are versions of the lighter red without them, it will not make them originals or make the printings indistinguishable. It would just mean I will have to use a different signifier to tell the printings apart. Those who are unsure about the use of the red lines can always refer to color tones on copies of postcards, something I already suggested as a backup in the last edition of my Guide, or they can employ the small dot in the left margin two inches down from where the chair touches the left border, the signifier used by Jacaeber Kastor of Psychedelic Solution who agrees with me that there are two readily distinguishable printings of FD-66, one known to be an original, one known to be a reprint.

This all being the case, I believe I have demonstrated to the satisfaction of a reasonable person that there are two printings of FD-66, that the ones without the ghosting, the faint vertical red lines described in my Guide, are the originals and that the ones with the ghosting are the reprints.

Change FD-67-OP-1 to read: On the original there is no left margin. The poster has been trimmed to the inner black border.
Change FD-67-RP-2 to read: There is a brown left border on the reprint.

Under FD-68 change the text to read:
FD-68-OP-1    Although in 2001 Phil Cushway, owner of Artrock, convinced me that all the variants of FD-68 poster were part of one printing, in 2009 I decided to revisit
    this image for a number of reasons. Based on new evidence, I concluded that there actually were at least two printings of this poster. The original can be distinguished from the reprint by the absence of the 1/16” dark blue dot described under FD-68-RP-2. There is a great deal of color variation on the originals of this poster.  14 1/64” x 20 9/32”
FD-68-RP-2    When this poster is held vertically with the green border to the left, there is a 1/16” dark blue dot located in the third pink line from the left about 3/8” up from the bottom edge. This is the pink line between and below the “C” and the “O” in “Concert.” 13 61/64” x 20”
FD-68-OPC-A    All postcards match the variants of FD-68-OP-1.  This card has a “place stamp here” reverse. 4 7/8” x 7”
FD-68-OPC-B    This card has a bulk rate permit reverse. 4 59/64” x 7 1/64”   
FD-68-OPC-C    Some copies of FD-68-OPC-B were mechanically addressed and sent to people on the mailing list. 
FD-68-RHB-D   In 2001 the San Diego Museum of Art used this image for a ticket sized handbill promoting a show of psychedelic posters. 2” x 6”

F. D. 68 Avalon Ballroom

This poster is red, green, blue and white. The central image is a Yin Yang symbol formed by
the lettering.

In 2009 what led me to study further the possibility of two printings for this poster is that I noticed
that although there was a great deal of color variation in one group of these posters, there was
another group which had no variation at all. All the colors were consistent, and none of this
group matched postcards. This separate group also was cut substantially smaller. In 2001 I had
disregarded this and assumed that the cutter had been adjusted during the press run. This was
incorrect.

After looking at the group which varied a lot in color and finding common printing
zits among them that did not appear on the second group as well as finding several plate marks
on one group and not on the other group as well as noting that the group that I eventually deter
mined was a reprint was on a substantially different paper stock, I concluded that there were
two printings printed with two different sets of printing plates.

Under FD-68 add

FD-68-RHB-D In 2001 the San Diego Museum of Art used this image for a handbill promoting
a show of psychedelic posters. 2" x 6"

Under FD-70 notes add:
It should be noted that the poster and card are not identical. The card is a mirror image of the poster.

Under FD-71 change the date to read "7/13-16/67."

Change FD-71-OP-1 to read: The original measures c. 13 27/32" x 21 7/8". This is about 1/2" longer than the reprint.
Change FD-71-RP-2 to read: The reprint measures c. 13 7/8" x 21 3/8". This is about 1/2" shorter than the original. The length is the distinguishing characteristic.
Change FD-71-OPC-A to read: The postcards match FD-71-OP-1 which is slightly different in color from the reprint.

Under FD-72 change the posters section to read:
 

FD-72-OP-1 The original has the ticket outlets strip in black and the image drawing in black and shades of gray. The dot described under FD-72-RP-3 does not appear. Colors match the card. 14" x 20 1/32"
FD-72-RP-2 This reprint has the ticket outlets strip and image drawing in shades of green.
The dot described under FD-72-RP-3 does not appear. 13 63/64" x 20 1/8"

FD-72-RP-3 This reprint has a 1/32" dot, black over red, located near the top of the loop between the "U" and the "L" of "JULY" just to the right of the top center of the poster. Colors do not match the card. 14" x 20 1/16"


Under FD-73 change the date to read "7/27-30/67."

Under FD-74 under acts delete "Tripping West to East."

After FD-78-RP-2 add

Under FD-78 notes add
In 2002 Mark Forer informed me that the origin of this image is a statue, Descending Night, which was part of an elaborate system of fountains at the 1915 San        Francisco Panama Pacific Exhibition. The creator of this sculpture is Adolph Weinman, a famous early Twentieth Century sculptor whose other works include the United States Mercury Head Dime and Liberty Walking Half Dollar.
In 2005 Mark Forer added further to our knowledge of the origin of this image by informing me that the model who posed for it, Audrey Munson (1891-1996), was no ordinary model. She was one of the great beauties of the day. She was the chief model of the Panama Pacific Interna-tional Exhibition. She posed for three quarters of the sculptures at that event and also for numerous murals and paintings there. She later had a movie career, and she was involved in a major scandal when a new York doctor murdered his wife in hopes of marrying her. He later hanged himself in prison while waiting to be executed. This murder, in which she was not involved, led to the end of her movie career. There are numerous other famous sculptures of her, many in New York where she lived for a time, including “Civic Fame” on top of City Hall. She is often described as America’s first super model. Unfortunately she eventually became paranoid and was committed to a mental hospital where she spent the last 65 years of her life. It all sounds very modern.

 

Under FD-78 artists add “Adolph Weinman”

Under FD-78 add
FD-78-PP-4        In 2006 I was shown a videotape of an episode of the television series Nash Bridges. In the episode Don Johnson/Nash Bridges goes to the
    offices of a music industry executive. Clearly visible on the office wall is a version of FD-78. This version is at least 2’ x 3’. This is much larger than any authorized
    copy of this image. I have never seen a copy of this item in person, but it clearly exists. I would appreciate it greatly if anyone who owns a copy of this
    version would show it to me. 


Under FD-81 Under "Paul Kagan" add: "(Photographer)."

Under FD-81-OP-1 change "only once" to "twice" and add "On the original the white of "Moscoso" and the ticket outlet strip is even and unbroken."

After FD-81-OP-1 add:

After FD-81-RP-3 add:
FD-81-PP-4    In 2004 an unauthorized use of this image was made by someone who produced what they called a “Giclee”                             print. It was substantially larger than a standard size Family Dog poster, and a white border was added. Colors                         were somewhat paler than the legitimate versions. It is unknown how many of these were produced before they                         were ordered to cease and desist by the copyright holder. 17 7/8” x 24 1/64”

After FD-82-OP-1 add Change "FD-82-RP-2" to "FD-82-RP-3."

Change posters under FD-83 to read
FD-83-OP-1    This poster was printed twice.  The stock on which this poster is printed has a rows or “woven” texture on the back. 14” x 20 1/16”
FD-83-RP-2    It has long been known from printing records that FD-83 was printed twice, but no one knew what the reprint looked like because it was one that was not distributed through the                             standard Family Dog channels. It was a reprint shipped directly from the printer to a record company for distribution to record stores around the country. In 2005 a copy of  this
                        reprint was finally identified. After studying the two versions side by side, I could find no printing marks which distinguished the one from the other. Colors were subtly different.
                        The orange is the most distinctly different. The reprint orange has much more red in it than that of the original. Unfortunately that would not enable someone with only one item to
                        identify it. Fortunately the paper stocks are different. The reprint was printed on stock which has a random texture on the back. The original has a rows or “woven” texture on the
                        back.  14 1/64” x 20 3/64”   

Add to FD-84(D-4)-OP-1 "The reprint was distinguished from the original in 1999. See
FD-84(D-4)-RP-2."

Change FD-84(D-4)-RP-2 to read:

"FD-84(D-4)-RP-2 In 1999 the reprint was distinguished from the original. The reprint has a 1/64" dot made up of both dark pink and light blue located 3/8" in from the edge of the white background circle at about three o’clock. There are other similar flaws, and colors are subtly different, but this dot on the reprint which is not on the original is the best distinguishing factor."
Add to FD-84(D-4)-OPC-A "printed in black."

Add to FD-84(D-4)-OPC-B "printed in rust/red."

Under FD-89 under artist add "Mouse *."

At the bottom of the page add:

Change FD-89 posters to read:
 
FD-89-OP-1 In 2001 Jacaeber Kastor of Psychedelic Solution along with his assistant , Brad Kelly, determined that this poster was printed twice. The original does not have either of the scratches listed under FD-89-RP-2 and FD-89-RP-3. 14 15/64" x 20"

FD-89-RP-2 The second printing was printed two up on double sized sheets. The two are not identical but were printed at the same time. Both FD-89-RP-2 and FD-89-RP-3 have a c. 3/4" long faint scratch running diagonally up toward the upper right corner beginning 3/8" above the "T" in "Concert" at the top. This item does not have the additional scratch described under          FD-89-RP-3. 14 1/64" x 20 63/64"

FD-89-RP-3 This item also has a c. 1 9/16" long scratch located in the panel with the chain and hook hoisting the Family Dog logo. It begins about 3/16" in from the left margin of the panel and extends obliquely upward and slightly to the right. 14" x 20 63/64"

Add to FD-90-OPC-A "printed in rust."

Add to FD-90-OPC-B "printed in black."

After FD-90-OPC-C add

"FD-90-OPC-D This card has a "place stamp here" reverse printed in black."


Under FD-92 change posters to  read:
FD-92-OP-1    In 2004 it was discovered that this poster was printed twice. The clear evidence of this is the existence of a photograph showing a printer‘s proof sheet of this poster printed two up side by side. All originals from this period except FD-98 and FD-99 were printed on sheets with the postcards.  Reprints were printed two up side by side. After careful study of numerous copies, it was learned that the original has neither of the markings described under FD-92-RP-2 or FD-92-RP-3. Furthermore the cards were printed on stock which has “rows” or “woven” texture on the back. The original printing of this poster can also be identified by this type of stock markings on the back. 14 1/32” x 20 11/64”
FD-92-RP-2       The reprint was printed two up, and it is possible to distinguish two different versions of the reprint. These are the left and right sides of the sheet, but it is not yet known which is the left and which is the right. Both of these are on stock which does not have “rows” or “woven” texture on the back. Both of these versions of the reprint are clearly identifiable by an irregular fine line which surrounds the Family Dog logo. This appears to be tape edge markings from where the logo was attached to the original artwork. This version does not have the small dot described under FD-92-RP-3. 13 31/32” x 19 31/32”
FD-92-RP-3    In addition to the irregular fine line surrounding the Family Dog logo this version of the reprint has a 1/32” long vertical purple dot/line in the right margin located 5/32” to the right of the right margin slightly below the level of the top of the “7” in “17” located in the lower right portion of the image.
14” x 19 15/16”



Under FD-96 under artist delete "Kelley."

Add to FD-96-OPC-A "printed in black."

Add to FD-96-OPC-B "printed in blue."

After FD-96-OPC-C add

"FD-96-OPC-D This card has a place stamp here reverse printed in dark pink."
Under FD-98 change FD-98-OP-1 to read: Under FD-98 after "FD-98-OP-1" add: Under FD-99 after "FD-99-OP-1" add: Under FD-99 change FD-99-OP-1 to read: This entry replaces any previous FD-101 entry.
 
 FD-101   Eternal Reservoir 
     (or the Source)
1/12-14/68  Avalon Ballroom
Rick Griffin Quicksilver Messenger Service 
Kaleidoscope 
Charley Musselwhite

 

The following text represents a complete revision of FD-101. It is not that the previous text
was wrong, only that it was confusing and inadequate. I apologize for any inconvenience this
may have caused.
 

    FD-101-OP-1 Reasonably conclusive evidence points in the direction that this poster was
    printed two times in the 1960‘s.  The original is on stock which has a woven pattern on
    the back. See FD-101-OP-5. This is described as “rows” by Jacaeber Kastor of Psychedelic
    Solution. If the “woven” back is held at the correct angle to bright light, the “rows” or
    “threads” appear. The back of the postcard  matches  this texture except for
    FD-101-OP-5. 14 1/64” x 20 5/64”

    FD-101-RP-2 The reprint has a glossy back with no rows pattern.  If the front of this
    printing is viewed at the correct angle under bright light, a rows or woven pattern will
    appear. No postcards of this variant are known. 13 63/64” x 19 15/16”

    FD-101-RP-3 In 1976 Rick Griffin printed copies of this image in double the standard
    poster size to distribute at a show in England.  These posters have a printed numbered
    notation that they are for this show. 20 3/8” x 29”

    FD-101-RP-4     In 1990 Pyramid Books in England printed this image. Paper stock is
    thick and high gloss. The top 1” of the image is missing. It had been thought that this
    was a pirate, but in 1997 it was learned that this was a properly licensed reprint. 11
    57/64” x 16 17/32”

    FD-101-OP-5    A small number of copies of this poster exist which do not have a rows or
    woven texture on either side. These copies are not a bright black as are the others,
    either originals or reprints. These are originals. 14” x 20 3/32”
     The author of this guide would like to acquire a copy of FD-101-OP-5.

    FD-101-OPC-A This card has a “place stamp here” reverse.  The back has a rows or
    woven texture which matches FD-101-OP-1. 5” x 6 63/64”

    FD-101-OPC-B This card has a bulk rate permit reverse.  The back has a rows or woven
    texture which matches FD-101-OP-1. 5” x 7 1/64”

    FD-101-OPC-C Some copies of FD-101-OPC-B were mechanically addressed and sent to
    people on the mailing list.

    FD-101-RPC-D In 1989 this postcard was reprinted in Italy on glossy stock.  some detail
    is lost.  “Rockin Umbria” appears on the reverse.

    FD-101-OPC-E       This card has a bulk mail permit back which does not have a rows or
    woven texture, nor does it have that texture on the front. It matches FD-101-OP-5.
     At this point in 2003 no copies of this card with a place stamp here square are known.
    Apparently these were produced early in the run and only have bulk mail backs which
    traditionally were printed first.

    FD-101-OPC-F        Some copies of FD-101-OPC-E were mechanically addressed and sent
    to people on the mailing list.
     The author of this guide would like to acquire a copy of either FD-101-OPC-E or
    FD-101-OPC-F.
 

F. D.101 Eternal Reservoir (or the Source)

This poster is several shades of blue, several shades of yellow, green and orange on a black
background. The central image is a heart shaped design with roots descending into the ground
below and branches rising into the air. There is an opening in the heart from which flow two
streams of orange liquid. Immediately upon seeing this image, viewers recognize Griffin's
intention was to depict a living entity which he saw in his mind and in his heart as both
growing from the soil and nourishing it. This is one of the most profoundly biophilic of the
psychedelic images, and for this reason it has been popular from the first day it was posted.
Griffin was a very complex man who, more than most people, confronted a number of serious
conflicts about the nature of spiritual reality. On one side of what he saw as the dual nature of
existence was the Old Testament "Jealous and Angry God" before whom we have all given in
to temptation and on the other was the New Testament Savior who stood between man and
the Old Testament God on Judgment Day. It is not surprising that his most graphic
interpretations of both of these diametric opposites appeared within only a few weeks of each
other. That Rick could see both the Eyeball of B.G. 105 and the Source of F. D. 101 in his
mind's eye at the same time shows that not only was he going through a period of intense
artistic fertility, he was also being torn between these two polarities as he wrestled with
himself and sought to decide on his own personal answers to the moral questions of existence
that all serious people must confront. Although Rick did choose to accept Jesus as his
personal Savior, the conflict inherent in these two images, the love of a nourishing, fleshly
world and the fear that this fleshly world was not nourishing and that love of it could lead to
eternal damnation, troubled him for the rest of his life. He both loved this life and feared that
by loving this life he would lose eternal life. Whatever the eternal Answer might be, Rick
Griffin certainly turned his seeking for that Answer into great art.

* Evidence: When it was noticed by Jim Northrup that the reprints of this poster had a woven
or rows texture on the front, the possibility was raised that these were originals which acciden
tally had been  printed on the wrong sides of the sheets. After considerable study of our various
copies, Jacaeber Kastor, the owner of Psychedelic Solution, and I spoke on the phone for sever-
al hours. The conclusions we reached are represented by the current text of FD-101.
First we noted that there were no known copies of an FD-101 postcard with a woven or rows
textured front.  This did not mean that they did not exist, but since Family Dog postcards and
original posters almost always were printed on the same sheets, and Family Dog postcards
were not reprinted in the 1960’s, and there are a lot of copies with the woven/rows front poster,
there  should be a lot of woven front cards if these were originals. We thought this was interest-
ing but not ample evidence to prove woven/rows front posters were reprints. We started look-
ing for internal evidence, evidence from the posters and cards themselves  which would resolve
this one way or the other.
Second we looked at a printer’s proofsheet of the original to find an open unprinted area. We
did this on the notion that if woven/rows front posters were originals, the open unprinted area
of a printer’s proofsheet would match the paper stock of the back of a woven/rows front poster.
After careful examination we determined that they did not match. Both to the unaided eye and
under magnification they appeared to be different paper stocks. The we examined them under
black light and found that they were drastically different in appearance under black light.
Third we noted that the back of the original had a woven/rows texture with lines that were more
vertical, and on the ones with the woven/rows front the lines were more horizontal.
A person without access to a printer’s proofsheet can study this by looking at the center of the
image of an original which has a small but significant white area in the “sun” portion of the im-
age. When this is compared under black light or magnification (but especially black light) to
the back of the reprint, they clearly are very different.
As for the discovery of FD-101-OP-5 this is documented by the fact that Mr. Kastor has a copy
of this as a card, and I have a copy of it as a poster. Each of us would like to acquire the one we
do not currently have. I had previously thought this was a unique reprint, but the discovery of
Mr. Kastor’s matching card proves it is an original, albeit a rather rare one. Under FD-104 change the date to read "2/2-4/68."

After FD-116-OPC-C add
FD-116-PPC-D  An Italian printing of this card on glossy stock was done in 1989. “Rockin Umbria
                           appears on the reverse.

Under FD-117-OP-1 add "by the Family Dog."
After FD-117-OP-1 add "FD-117-RP-2  In 2008 the artist who created this image in 1968 celebrated its 40th anniversary by completely recreating the image and printing a limited edition of 100 copies. '1968/2008' is added next to 'Crome Syrcus.' 17 1/32" x 23 49/64""

Under FD-118 change "Flamin’s" to "Flamin’"

Under FD-120 change posters to read:
FD-120-OP-1   This poster was printed lawfully only once. 13 21/32" x 19 63/64"
FD-120-PP-2    In 2008 a pirate/bootleg of this poster was printed, probably in Australia, and sold on ebay. This poster was printed digitally on semi-gloss stock unlike the lawful original
                         which was printed on uncoated index. This bootleg can be distinguished by the fact that the white area are not pure white but are filled with small, colored dots.
                         14 3/32" x 21 7/64"

Under FD-125 under artist add "*L. Kent Hollister."

Under FD-125 add:
 

* The original Family Dog catalog listed "David Warren" as the artist who created the artwork for FD-125. When I communicated with Mr. Warren in 1979, he confirmed that he had created this poster. Although I noticed that two different pens, one much wider than the other, were used to create this design, I gave it no further thought.
In the late 1980’s someone at a show gave me very credible evidence that this design was a collaboration by two artists. I called L. Kent Hollister at the phone number I had been given, and it had been disconnected. I wrote to the address I had been given, and the letter came back stamped "Not at This Address."
Over the years this continued to bother me because the evidence for collaboration was significant and obvious. I did not like the idea of depriving someone of credit in the guide, but without being able to contact Mr. Hollister for confirmation, I could go no further.
In early 2000 I came across the slip of paper with the old address on it, and for some reason or other I decided to write to it again. To my amazement I got an answer from Mr. Hollister who had been there all along and had no idea why the letter had been returned. I made an appointment and drove up to see him.
The details of the collaboration are simply that the central face was drawn first by L. Kent Hollister who at the time was creating portraits from photographs. The photograph used here was a Victorian portrait of a young woman he had found in a book. He gave the drawing to David Warren who drew the floral border and lettering.
For those collectors who want the evidence besides the substantial differences in style and the widths of the pens, Mr. Hollister showed me several of his older drawings with similar cross hatching. Although I did not know him in the 1960’s, he went to concerts and did album cover work for Quicksilver. Also he knew and worked with George Hunter,
but the clincher, so to speak, is his 1960’s logo/signature on the piece. Look just to the right of the "N" in "Avalon" and amidst the flowers a drawing of an eye is hidden. This is Mr. Hollister"s signature. It is worth noting that the same eye signature appears at the bottom center on the Carousel Ballroom Moby Grape handbill for April 12 & 13, 1968, AOR#2.161, which was also created by Mr. Hollister.
After FD-125-OPC-E add:
FD-125-OPC-F This card is of the FD-125 image only and has a bulk mail permit reverse
     4 5/8” x  7 21/32”


Under FD-128 change the date to read "7/19-21/68."

Under FD-134 change the photographer to “Arnold Genthe” and change the description to read:
“This poster is several shades of brown on a beige background. The central image is a
photograph of a woman wearing a long, flowing gown. She has her arms raised straight above
her head. The photograph is an early 20th-century photograph by Arnold Genthe. Over the
years I had been told several times that the partially legible photographers credit read “Zenthe.“
This is incorrect. The photographer was named Arnold Genthe (1869-1942). I was repeatedly
told that the woman in the photograph is Isadora Duncan, a dancer who was very famous in the
early Twentiethth-century. It is not. The woman in the photograph is Anna Pavlova from a pho-
tograph taken Nov. 8, 1915. Pavlova also was a very famous dancer in the early 20th Century.
The card for this image and No. 133 were printed as a pair.”

Under FD-135 after FD-136-OPC-D add
FD-136-OPC- E In 2010 a blank backed version of this card was discovered. 4 49/64" x 6 1/2"


Under FD-137 add

FD-137-RPC-E In 1971 Tea Lautrec Litho printed the image photograph without the concert information as a postcard. "Ride this Train" appears on the reverse.

Under FD-139 add

FD-139-RPC-E In 1971Tea Lautrec Litho printed the image photograph without the concert information as a postcard. "Holy City Service" appears on the reverse.
FD-139-OPC-F In 2010 a blank backed version of this card was discovered. 6 35/ 64" x 4 39/64"

After FD-142-OPC-D add

"FD-141-OPC-E This card is of only the FD-141 image. It has a blank reverse."
Under FD-142-PP-2 change "Befheart" to "Beafheart."

After FD-142-PP-2 add
 
FD-142-PP-3 In 1999 yet another pirate printing of this image was discovered. Although it         does not bear the "San Francisco Poster Co." credit, the dot screen pattern is   very similar to FD-142-PP-2. The correct acts appear on the bill.

After FD-146-OPC-D add:

Under FD-D5 Change the text of posters for FD-D5 to read
FD-D5-OP-1    In 2011 it was discovered that this poster was printed three times. The original
                         does not have the dot described under both reprints. 13 61/64” x 19 31/64”
FD-D5-RP-2    The first reprint, the more common one, FD-D5-RP-2, is on stock which is
                         smooth on both sides. It has a small 1/64” dot in the gray top margin about 1/8” above the left side of the “O” in “Oct.” It is much shorter than the second
                         reprint, the uncommon one, FD-D5-RP-3. 14” x 18 61/64”
FD-D5-RP-3     The second reprint, the less common one, also has the dot described under
                          FD-D5-RP-2. This reprint is on stock which has a rows or woven pattern on
                          the front. It is much longer than FD-D5-RP-2. The best way to tell them apart
                          is by measuring the length. 13 15/16” x 20 1/16”
See notes.

Change the notes for FD-D5 to read:
F. D.-D. 5 Kitty

This poster is several shades of purple, several shades of magenta, several shades of pink,
black, and white in a gray frame. The central image is a photograph of the face of a cat. A
distorted grid has been superimposed over parts of the face of the cat.
The printing records of California Litho Plate, the printer for the Family Dog at this time, show
that this was one of several posters printed in a 5,000 press run which was shipped directly from
the printer to Capitol Records for distribution to record stores around the country. Since the
newly discovered FD-D5-RP-3 clearly is a separate printing from FD-D5-RP-2 because the cut
size is so different and the stock also is different, and it is very unlikely this poster was printed
four times, it is logical to assume that FD-D5-RP-3 is the missing printing which was shipped
directly to Capitol Records.
                *       *       *


Under FD-D7 change posters to read:
FD-D7-OP-1 This poster was printed twice. The original has lettering which is brownish green which matches the postcard. 14" x 20 1/16"

FD-D7-RP-2 The reprint has lettering which is gold. This is distinctly different from the card which is brownish green. This version is on somewhat glossy/ slick stock. 14 1/16" x 19 61/64"

FD-D7-RP-3 This reprint has lettering which is also gold in tone. It is from the same press run as FD-D7-RP-2, but it is on uncoated index. 14 1/32" x 19 61/64"

Add to FD-D-13-OPC-A "printed in lavender."

Add to FD-D-13-OPC-B "printed in lavender."

After FD-D-13-OPC-D add
 
FD-D-13-OPC-D This number reserved for future use.
FD-D-13-OPC-E This card has a bulk mail permit reverse printed in gray.
FD-D-13-OPC-F Some copies of FD-D-13-OPC-E were mechanically addressed and sent to people on the mailing list.

Under FD-D14-OPC-A add:

Under FD-D14-OPC-B change "gray" to "light olive green."

Under FD-D14 after FD-D14-PPC-D add: Under FD-D15 add "Mouse" under "artist."

After FD-D15 add:

FD-D16       
    12/22&23/1967                  1601 West Evans Street, Denver, CO
     Bob Fried            The Otis Redding Show
A concert had been planned for the Family Dog Denver venue on the weekend of
12/22&23/1967. It was to feature Otis Redding who unfortunately died before the concert
which was canceled. This concert was to have been numbered FD-D16. No posters or post
cards were distributed or printed prior to this intended concert.

In the mid 1970s after the sudden, untimely death of the artist Bob Fried, I met with his widow,
Penelope Fried, to purchase signed copies of his Family Dog and Bill Graham numbered post-
ers which were in her possession. At that time she showed me an original artwork by her late
husband which had been created by him for the canceled FD-D16 concert. It was a very beauti-
ful artwork even in black and white, and I offered to purchase it from her, but she did not want
to sell it. I have no idea what happened to this original artwork after that. It did not occur to me
then that this artwork might have been photographed in preparations for burning printing plates,
or that the film from this photography might still exist.

In the late 1980s Phil Cushway of Artrock acquired the archives of the printer, California Litho
Plate, which had been the printer for the Family Dog in 1967. Eventually he discovered film for
this poster in the large California Litho Plate archive. In the 1990s he constructed what he felt
was a likely color scheme for Fried’s original artwork. I do not know if he ever saw the original
artwork which I saw in Penelope Fried’s possession in the late 1970s, but the artwork did in-
clude a color key of Fried’s intentions for the poster. All I remember of the color key was that
orange, a favorite color of Fried’s for his Family Dog artwork, was on the color key, and red
with some orange in it is a prominent color of this image. My only quibble with Cushways’s
interpretation of Fried’s original design from the film is that I doubt Fried would have left a
substantial white area at the top.

Cushway/Artrock never made a significant attempt to sell posters from this very limited edition
printing of FD-D16 almost all of which passed into the hands of Wolfgangs Vault when the
Vault purchased almost all the inventory of Artrock in the mid 2000s. Since the Vault is now
selling copies from this limited edition of uncut printer’s proofs, it is now appropriate to include
this image in this Guide. The copies the Vault is now selling are numbered 1 through 35.

Since it was not printed before the event with the intention of distribution to promote the con-
certs, this item can not reasonably be called an original printing, but since it never was printed
prior to this edition, it can not be described as a reprint either, so I simple designate it
FD-D16-P-1 (“P” for “Poster”). No postcards were printed.

While it would be difficult to argue that a copy of this poster is necessary for a complete set of numbered, original Family Dog posters, I think it would be an attractive addition to a complete set as well as an interesting piece of decor to hang in ones home or office.

 

Change posters under FD-D18 to read:
FD-D18-OP-1    This poster exists in three variants.  In 2014 the issue of which of these variants is an original and which is a reprint was revisited. This, the purple variant, has a red triangle in the upper left corner as background for the Family Dog logo. It is the only original. See essay at the end of this item.                            12 45/64” x 21 33/64”    
FD-D18-RP-2       This, the dark blue variant, has a black triangle in the upper left corner as back
                            ground for the Family Dog logo.  Both black triangle variants are reprints. See
                            essay at the end of this item. FD-D18-OP-1 and FD-D18-RP-2 have image
                            backgrounds of blue/purple which are so different in tone that simply less
                            ink on the plate could not account for the difference.  This variant is on non            
                            reflective index. A small but not inconsequential number of copies of this
                            printing were miscut by the operator of the guillotine so that the top edge is
                            oblique with the right edge about 1/2” shorter than the left. 12 21/32” x 21 3/4”
FD-D18-RP-3    In 1999 a black triangle version on semi glossy stock was discovered. This version is a substantially darker blue/purple than  FD-D18-OP-1 or FD-D18-RP-2. It was discovered along with previously unknown similar semi glossy stock versions of FD-52, FD-64, FD-78 and FD-81 all of which were clearly reprints. It, too, is a reprint. 12 41/64” x 21 3/4”



Change FD-D-18-?PC-D to read

"FD-D-18-OPC-D This card has no light blue stripe in the right margin. It has a "place stamp here" reverse printed in the same light blue as the doorway."


Under FD-D-18-OPC-A delete "…is…6 31/32""

Under FD-D-18-OPC-B delete "the… OPC-A" and "It measures… 6 31/32""

Change "FD-D-18-?PC-D" to "FD-D-18-OPC-D" and delete "is the same…?P-2" and "It measures… 6 31/32"" and "The existence… in this case."

After FD-D-18-OPC-D add
 
FD-D-18-OPC-E This card has no light blue strip in the right margin and has a bulk mail permit
reverse printed in the same light blue as the doorway.
FD-D-18-OPC-F Some copies of FD-D-18-OPC-E were mechanically addressed and sent to People on the mailing list.

Delete "Further confusing… bright light."

Change "FD-86" to FD-109."

Delete "over three months… FD-86" and replace with "well before FD-109."

After FD-D-18-OPC-F add
 
FD-D-18-OPC-G This card has no light blue stripe in the right margin. It has a "place stamp here" reverse printed in black. It is wider than the other cards and similar in width to FD-D-18-OPC-D.
FD-D-18-OPC-H The discovery of FD-D-18-OPC-G in 2000 leads me to believe there is a            narrower version of FD-D-18-OPC-D (no blue stripe but with a blue imprint       "place stamp here" reverse) with dimensions similar to FD-D-18-OPC-A. Time    will tell...   Add to this section, "A copy of this variant was showed to me in 2009."
Also under FD-D18 under * delete the entire section following the * and replace it with:
*    Previously in this space there was a long essay about the colors of the various printings of
FD-D18 and what they might show about whether the black triangle versions of FD-D18 were
originals or  reprints. This material has been eliminated because it has now been proved that
black triangle versions of FD-D18 are reprints. See FD-D18-RP-2.

At the end of FD-D18 add:
    .  A printer's proof exists with the red triangle poster and six postcards.  Printing records of the Family Dog from California Litho plate and Tea Lautrec Litho clearly indicate no postcards were reprinted, so red triangle is an original.
In 2014 the author of this Guide revisited the issue of whether black triangle versions
of FD-D18 were originals or reprints. He was assisted in this research by Grant Feichtmeier of
Wolfgangs Vault and Mike Storeim of Classic Posters.

The following facts were determined from examination of a large number of posters and  post-
cards and several printer’s proof sheets. The red triangle version poster was printed on three
very distinct, different paper stocks. The postcards also were printed on these same three differ-
ent stocks. Although these stocks appear the same to the naked eye, under black light they ap-
pear very different. The black triangle versions, both FD-D18-RP-2 and FD-D18-RP-3, are on
stocks which also are very distinctly different from each other and from the three paper stocks
of FD-D18-OP-1. There are no postcards on either of the two stocks on which FD-D18-RP-2
and FD-D18-RP-3 appear. If either of these were originals, there would be postcards on these
stocks because all the original cards done by California Litho Plate except for the odd sized
FD-98 and FD-99 were printed on the same double sheets as the original posters, one poster on
the left and four or six postcards on the right.

It was also noted that the cutter trimmed red triangle at the bottom right up to the bottom of the
ticket outlets strip. The cutter trimming black triangle versions trimmed them substantially
below the ticket outlets strip. On black triangle versions below the ticket outlets strip there is a
white spot with small amounts of red and blue within the spot. On all known uncut proof sheets
of red triangle the color ends immediately below the ticket outlets strip, that is, the area below
the ticket outlets strip is all white. This is why the red triangle posters were cut so close to the
ticket outlets strip at the bottom. If they had been cut any lower there would have been a white
strip all across the bottom. The white spot which appears at the bottom of black triangle
could not possibly have been at the bottom of red triangle if it had been cut longer because the
entire area on the proof sheets is white. This is clear evidence that red triangle and black
triangle were printed with different printing plates, further evidence that black triangle was
printed separately.






Under FD-I-OHB-A add: In 2011 a forgery dating from the 1970s was discovered. The distinguishing characteristic of this forgery is the vertical measurement of the distance along the right
                                         margin from the outside edge of the horizontal black line at the top edge of the image to the outside edge of the horizontal line at the bottom. This measurement on
                                         genuine copies is 10 5/32" plus or minus 1/64."


After FD-I-OHB-E add:
FD-I-RHB-F      In 2005 Perry Pfeffer in conjunction with the late Chet Helms, Kelley and
    George Hunter arranged for a hand done silkscreen reprint of Family Dog handbills I, II, III and IV. These were printed four to a sheet, one of each on a sheet. The stock used was high quality smooth, but not glossy stock .0090” thick. This is readily distinguished  from the original handbills which are on stock less than .0060” thick. The reprint stock is ecru/off white in color. 265 sheets were printed. 65 uncut sheets were signed by Helms, Kelley and Hunter. 100 uncut sheets were unsigned. 100 sheets were cut in quarters.  The cut handbills were not signed. This item is the single reprint handbill of FD-I.
    10 1/64” x 13”
FD-I-IV-RP-4    This item is the uncut sheet described under FD-I-RHB-F. Because of its size
    it is numbered as a poster. 24”x 31”

After FD-I-IV-RP-4 add:   FD-I-FHB-G   In 2011 a forgery of this handbill was discovered. It appears to date from the early to mid 1970s. The stock of paper used was somewhat more porous
                                                                   and coarse than genuine originals, and slight detail is lost, but the best way to distinguish this forgery is the measurement described under
                                                                   FD-I-OHB-A. On the forgery this measurement is 10 1/16." It is not possible to give the original size of this forgery because the copy which was
                                                                   discovered had been trimmed.

After FD-II-OHB-B add:
FD-II-RHB-C    This item is the 2005 reprint. See FD-I-RHB-F and FD-I-IV-RP-4.

After FD-III-OHB-A add:
FD-III-RHB-B     This item is the 2005 reprint. See FD-I-RHB-F and FD-I-IV-RP-4.

After FD-IV-OHB-A add:
FD-IV-RHB-B   This item is the 2005 reprint handbill. It should be noted that although the silkscreen used to print these items was made from the original 1965-1966 film, this reprint was not nearly as clear and sharp as the original. The dot screen of the reprint was much coarser than the dot screen of the original. The reason for this is that the silkscreen process does not produce as sharp an image as offset lithography printed with a metal plate. See FD-I-RHB-F and FD-I-IV-RP-4.
FD-IV-FHB-C    In 2005 at the TRPS swap meet I was shown a forgery of this handbill which had been in the possession of the person selling it since approximately 1975. It is important to note that forging of this material was going on even as far back as the middle 1970s. As with all such forgeries which are produced by photographing an original and using the photograph to produce a new printing plate, the resulting handbill is much fuzzier, less clear than the original. The reason for this loss of clarity, unlike the loss with the silkscreen process, is due to the impossibility of producing a new plate from a genuine original handbill that captures all the fine detail of the original. This forgery is on stock with a very clear vertical rows/woven texture. These rows are about 1/16” across and visible on both sides of the stock.  The original handbill is not on stock with rows/woven texture. This stock is .0110” thick. The original is on stock less than
    .0060” thick. 8 31/64” x 11”
FD-IV-FHB-D   In 2011 a forgery of this handbill turned up in Europe. One thing that was clear
    about this forgery was that it was quite old. It was printed with a very early photocopy machine, probably in the early 1970s. Since it is so old, it is impossible to say whether this forgery was done in the U.S.A., possibly in the San Francisco Bay Area, or in Europe. This specific copy had been sold to its 2011 owner as a genuine original. This copy was printed on very pale green paper. A lot of detail was lost, and the inking was very uneven. There are lots of small white spots in the black areas, particularly on the black colored jackets of three of the five band members. These areas are even, uninterrupted black on the original and the 2008 reprint. It is possible other forgeries were printed at the same time on other colored papers so the key thing to look out for is the uneven inking with lots of tiny white spots. There also is a faint black horizontal line all across the bottom and the top of this forgery about 1/8” in from the bottom and top edges of the paper. 8 23/32” x 11 13/32”


Change "Dr. Strange" to "Sparkle Plenty" both times.

Under FD-VI change "fakil" to "fakir."

Under FD-VII change handbills to read:
FD-VII-OHB-B    This variant is black ink on tan paper. There is a mid-1970s forgery of this handbill on an orange/tan stock. On the legitimate original in the oval around George’s face in the black area immediately to the viewer’s left of George’s hair there should be at least a dozen narrow white areas at least 1/16” long which are not quite horizontal but run from left to right rising a bit as they move from left to right.  8 1/2” x 10 63/64”
FD-VII-FHB-C  On the forgery much detail is lost, and the area mentioned under
    FD-VII-OHB-B is almost completely black. This item was originally created with the deliberate intention of deceiving people into thinking it was a genuine
    original as were the forgeries of handbills of FD-1, FD-3, FD-6 and FD-12 which were all done by the same person. 8 33/64” x 11”

After FD-660226 add:

FD-660624
   
        6/24&25/66                             Avalon Ballroom

        Dennis Nolan                               Big Brother & the Holding Company

FD-660624-OHB-A    When I originally added the unnumbered material to this Guide, I
    accidentally failed to include this handbill which definitely is a Family
    Dog image. Chet Helms was managing Big Brother & the Holding Company at this time, and he had Dennis Nolan create a handbill with a blank
    space in the center which could be used for multiple events by having a
    rubber stamp made with the location and dates of the concerts. In this
    case the words “AVALON BALLROOM” and the dates “June 24 & 25”
    were stamped in red. There is no poster size version of this handbill, but
    since this was an alternate handbill for the FD-14 event, the other FD-14
    material also is for this same concerts. See also FD-660923.
     5 31/64” x 8 1/2”


FD-660923
 
    9/23&24/66                             Avalon Ballroom

        Dennis Nolan                               Big Brother & the Holding Company
                         Howlin’ Wolf

FD-660923-OHB-A    When I originally added the unnumbered material to this Guide, I
    accidentally failed to include this handbill which definitely is a Family
    Dog image. Chet Helms was managing Big Brother & the Holding Company at this time, and he had Dennis Nolan create a handbill with a blank
    space in the center which could be used for multiple events by having a
    rubber stamp made with the location and dates of the concerts. In this
    case Chet had printing in rust color added that listed the Avalon Ballroom on September 23 & 24. It also said that Big Brother had just returned from Chicago, and that Howlin’ Wolf would be
    appearing with them. See also FD-660624. 5 33/64” x 8 17/32”


         FD-661112       
         11/12/66                       Campus Hall    UC Irvine
         Unknown                      Oxford Circle
                                             Magnificent VII
        FD-661112-OP-1    I had first seen this small poster in the mid-1970s and concluded it was
                                         a rip off usage of the Family Dog logo. In 2004 Joe Armstrong asked
                                         me about it, and I decided to ask Chet who remembered it as an authorized
                                         usage so it is now being added to the guide.  10 15/64” x 15 11/32”


Under FD-670002 Change OHB to OPC and change "handbill" to "postcard." Add "This version has a place stamp here back."
After FD-670002-OPC-A add "FD-670002-OPC-B  This version has a bulk mail permit back."

After FD-670004-OHB-A add:


Under FD-671123 add

FD-671123-OHB-D    Some copies of the card have a blank back.

After FD-680221A-OHB-A add

Under FD-P-680223 after FD-P-2-680223-OHB-A
add:
*In 2011 Brad Kelly discovered a large (c.18”x 24”) black and white photostatic reproduction of this item, almost certainly from the original artwork. Since it was not in color, appeared to be
a photographic enlargement made directly from the original artwork, never had been seen before by any of the major collectors of Portland/Crystal Ballroom material, and came from the
estate of someone associated with concerts at the Crystal Ballroom, for the time being it can be assumed that this is a unique item probably done for display in the glass case in front of the
Crystal Ballroom itself.

It is not the policy of the author of this Guide to include items which were not produced in quantity and distributed to promote the concerts because this is a Guide to just such material:  
posters, postcards and handbills originally printed in quantity prior to the event with the intention of distribution to promote the rock concerts or the same images printed in quantity after the concerts to sell for profit. This is not such an item. The above facts about it lead to the conclusion that it does not suit the usual criteria for listing in this Guide, but since it was sold at an auction in 2011, and a collector years from now may encounter it, it is described here to avoid future confusion. If another copy appears, it will be reasonable to assume that there was some very limited distribution to promote the concerts listed on it, and it will be assigned a number in this Guide.

It should be noted in passing that while I was doing research for the above note, I was asked why I do not include in this Guide the several handbills dating after P-4 which bear the appellation “Crystal Dog” while I do include the five items done in Denver after FD-D-18. The answer is that the people who put on the five post FD-D-18 concerts at the 1601 West Evans venue were all former employees of Chet Helms who specifically asked him if they could attempt to continue the Family Dog series in Denver using the Family Dog name. They told me Chet told them he did not care, and in the 1980s Chet specifically confirmed that to me. No such authorization by Chet Helms, who at that time owned the dba “The Family Dog,” exists for the Crystal Dog material. Since Chet was not associated in any way with these later Portland concerts, not even to authorize the use of his copyrighted logo or the use of the word “Dog,” there is no reason to include them in a Guide to Family Dog material.


Under FD-680308B-OHB-A add "This variant is in purple ink on pale blue paper."

After FD-680308B-OHB-A add
FD-680308B-OHB-B In 2013 a variant in purple ink on yellow paper was discovered. 8 33/64" x 11"

Under FD-680308I change the dates to "3/8-10/68"
After FD-680301I add
FD-680308J:    Flying Car  Same data as FD-680306-C (Above)
FD-680308J-OHB-A   See notes to FD-680308-OHB-C   8 1/2 x 11"

After FD-680406 Add:

 
FD-680406
FD-680512           Civic Center Plaza
5/12/68 
San Andreas Fault   Kaleidoscope
Studios             Initial Shock 
                    Country Weather
                    A. B. Skhy Blues Band 
























FD-680512-OHB-A  In 1998 a handbill on coarse light blue paper was discovered for this event which was a benefit for and jointly put on with the Haight-Ashbury Medical Clinic. The ink used was medium to dark blue. It measures 13 15/16" x 8 1/2". This handbill was printed only once. 
Under FD-680528 change "Unknown" to "San Andreas Fault."

Under FD-680701 change the date to read "7/1/68."

After FD-681122B add

FD-681122C
11/22-24                Avalon Ballroom
Unknown               Sir Douglas Quintet + 2
                               Velvet Underground
                               Flaming Groovies
FD-681122C-OP-1   In 2010 a hand drawn poster was discovered for an event at the Avalon Ballroom for the weekend between FD-146 and FD-147. This was just prior to the Family Dog
                                  losing the rights to the Avalon Ballroom and temporarily going out of business, a time of considerable chaos for the Family Dog. Presumably this weekend of concerts
                                  was booked too late to have an artist create a design for a poster and bring it to the printer so a hand drawn poster was created. After some additional research I learned
                                  that several other copies of this hand drawn poster exist. Although they are not identical to this one, they are very similar. This one was done on the back of a copy of
                                  FD-146-OP-1

Under FD-690704 add: In 2006 a ticket for the FD-690704 event was discovered. It was designed by San Andreas Fault Studios.

Under FD-690718A add: In 2006 a ticket for the FD-690718A event was discovered. It as designed by San Andreas Fault Studios.

After FD-690718B add
 
 FD-690718C*
 
  
7/18-20/69 660 Great Highway
Baron Wolman 
     (Photographer)
Sir Douglas Quintet
Bicycle
   Kwanditos

   
 

FD-690718C-PP-1                   In 2002  notorious poster pirate from Austin, Texas
  created this poster and fraudulently claimed that it was an original
  poster created in 1969 for the shows listed on FD-690718A and
  FD-690718B. He did so to cash in on the popularity of Doug Sahm
  of the Sir Douglas Quintet in the Austin area. This is not a poster
  created in 1969, but a 21st Century pirate. 13 57/64” x 19 7/64”

*One of the most insidious assaults upon poster collectors since the mid 1990’s has been  the
post facto creation of posters for events which actually took place and sometimes even had
legitimate posters created to advertise them. The first one of these I saw was one for the Rolling
Stones appearance at Altamont. Although the event took place in 1969, the picture was of a
Mick Jagger who was at least 40 years old. The seller on ebay swore he had been at the event,
gotten the poster there and kept it under his bed ever since. In general this kind of piracy has
not been that much of a problem with items in this Guide because the copyright holders act-
ively defend their rights, and this is an infringement on the Family Dog copyrighted logo, but
this just shows the importance of vigilance on the part of collectors.

Under FD-690807A change artist from "T. Daly" to "Trish Daly."

After FD-690815-OHB-D add

"FD-690815-OHB-E In 1999 a copy was found on pale blue/green stock."
After FD-690915 Add Add to FD-690925-OHB-A Under FD-691003 under acts add "10/6 Steve Gaskin"

Under FD-691007 change "600" to "660."

Under FD-691010 add "660 Great Highway" above "A. B. Skhy" level with "10/10-12/69."

Under FD-691031-OHB-A add “Color varies between gray and gray/purple.”

Before FD-691113-OHB-A add:
"FD-691113-OP-1 In 1997 a poster size of this image was discovered."

After FD-691126 add:
    FD-691127
    11/27/69                             660 Great Highway
    Unknown                            The  Free City Puppets
                                               The End of the World Mob
FD-691127-OHB-A           In 2004 a large handbill on very fragile paper was discovered for this
                                           event. It was printed only once. It is fascinating that even at this late
                                           date new and previously unknown items are still being discovered.
                                           11 15/32” x 16 63/64”


Under FD-700206 change the text to read:
             FD-700206-OHB-A    In 2011 it was discovered that this handbill was printed twice. The original was printed on smooth, plain stock which is .0035” thick. On the original there is
                                                 substantial dot screen on the horse and rider. This is most  noticeable around the rider’s right elbow and the horse’s rear legs, but it appears elsewhere as well.
                                                 8 1/2” x 10 63/64”
             FD-700206-PHB-B     Somewhere back in the 1970s someone bootlegged this handbill. Since it is not a major rarity, this was not a forgery but rather a pirate made to sell at low cost.
                                                 Copies of this pirate have emerged forty years later to confuse collectors. The pirate is on pebbled stock which is much thicker, 006”, than the genuine original. The
                                                 dot screen on the horse and rider on the original is completely gone on the pirate so that the horse and rider  appear to be a solid color. A different printing plate was
                                                 used.  8 25/64” x 11 1/32”





After FD-700410 add:
FD-700416
4/16/70                              660 Great Highway
Barry Thomas                    Allen Ginsberg
                                          Philip Lamantia
                                          Michael McClure
                                          Malachi
                                          Floating Lutus Magic Opera Company
FD-700416-OHB-A    In 2007 Dennis King discovered this handbill which was created for a benefit for Timothy Leary. 8" x 16"


Under FD-700619-OHB-B change "black" to "purple."

Under FD-700714-OHB-A change the height from 7" to 17"

 

Under FD-700821-OHB-A add, "but it was printed on two paper stocks. This item is the more common version which is on uncoated stock.
After FD-700821-OHB-A add:
FD-700821-OHB-B  This item is the less common version on slick, coated stock. 8 15/32" x 10 19/32"

xxxxxxx

Bill Graham

At the end of BG-0-OHB-A add: After BG-0-OHB-A add: "BG-0-OHB-B  On the right one of the pair there is no indentation with brush strokes. The margin at this level is nearly straight. Both are legitimate originals."

Under BG-0 notes add:
I first published a Guide to psychedelic rock concert posters in 1979, but it was not until the third edition, the first illustrated one in 1996, that I attempted to approach the material with a rigorous, scholarly and academic attention to detail. Shortly after that Jacaeber Kastor, the former owner of the Psychedelic Solution in New York City, published his catalog which also was a serious attempt to describe the printing history of this material. While both of us were familiar with the research of the other, we each did our own independent study and examined large collections of the series over a long period of time. We discovered that we disagreed on only about a dozen items. Over the last ten years we have managed to resolve our differences on all but one item, and to give Mr. Kastor his due, he was right more times than I was.
This brings us to BG-0. It was his belief that the item designated BG-0-OP-1 in my Guide was actually a reprint. He held that only the item designated BG-0-OP-2 in my Guide was an original. Unlike most of the other material where we had been able to find hard evidence such as printing records or paper stocks which matched mailers, in the case of BG-0 there was no evidence like this on which to go. We only had our instincts as scholars of the material. He believed that since OP-2 was much more scarce than OP-1, that OP-1 must be a reprint. I believed that since Bonnie MacLean, who had created this image and managed the art department of Bill Graham Presents during the time this would have been reprinted if it had been reprinted, could not recall it's having been reprinted, and that since this was not an image for which there was a high demand, it was unlikely that this image was reprinted. Jacaeber put some weight on the fact that OP-1 and OP-2 were printed with different plates on different stocks of paper to support his argument, and I stressed the fact that the BG-0 handbill exists in two forms both of which we know to predate the concert and which are originals because there exists a printers proof sheet of two handbills printed side-by-side on which one variant is on the left, the other on their right. Furthermore neither handbill exactly matches either poster which led me to believe that there was substantial alteration of the artwork during the printing process at which time two plates were produced which were different. Jacaeber then asked why there would have been two different printing plates used in such a short run. I had no answer. I could only speculate that after a handful of BG-0's were produced that something went wrong with the printing plate, and that it was necessary to produce another plate and that in the time between the production of plate number one and plate number two that Bonnie or someone else made alterations to the artwork which show up as the differences between OP-1 and OP-2. It is worth noting that even if OP-1 was a reprint, it still would have been necessary for the original artwork to have been slightly altered before the plate which produced the second version was burned because there are several lines in the drawing of each version which differ.
This led to a stalemate which, it seemed would never be resolved because it appeared unlikely that new evidence ever would emerge which would support one point of view or the other. Then in 2005 Mr. Kastor sold his business and his complete personal collection to Wolfgangsvault which is located in San Francisco. The owner of Wolfgangsvault, Mr. Bill Sagan, has been very gracious and helpful in allowing me access to the material in the vault to enable me to do ongoing research on the printing history of this material, and on a visit there in late 2005 I asked to see what Mr. Kastor had in his collection in the way of BG-0. To my amazement I found something which I believe resolves this matter once and for all.
I have long owned and uncut printer's proof sheet of BG-0-OP-2. This is only slightly larger than the finished poster and has unprinted areas forming borders on three sides of the printed area. These unprinted areas were trimmed off before distribution. Mr. Kastor's collection included in it an identically configured uncut printer's proof sheet of BG-0-OP-1. This seems to be conclusive evidence that both OP-1and OP-2 were done at approximately the same time on the same press prior to the event. The notion that if BG-0-OP-1`was printed 10 or 14 months later (It would have had to have been that long if it was a reprint because no reprinting was done until long after April 1966, the time of the BG-0 concerts.), that the printer's proof sheets of OP-1`and OP-2 would have been configured identically despite the use of different plates and probably different presses seems extremely unlikely and probably impossible. Therefore I believe the existence of these identically configured printer's proof sheets of BG-0-OP-1 and BG-0-OP-2 is proof dispositive that both are originals printed before the event for distribution to promote the concerts.
I believe the fact that there are so few extant copies of BG-0-OP-2, far fewer than any other numbered Bill Graham original from this period, supports my conclusion that something went wrong very early in the printing process of OP-2 which necessitated the burning of a second printing plate. It is unfortunate that ten years ago I designated the more common version "OP-1" (I did this because it was more common.) because it now appears "OP-2" may be the earlier version, but since both predate the event, both are originals, and the presence of either is acceptable as part of a complete set of originals. I believe it would be confusing to reverse the designations at this late date, but I believe it is important to note that BG-0-OP-2 may predate BG-0-OP-1, but this is not certain, and both are, as I have demonstrated, originals.

In 2009 an eagle eyed Electric Dave Lawrence noted a very important typographical error under the dimensions of BG-0-OP-2. Until this time the length of this poster was listed in my Guide as 18 31/32". This is incorrect. The correct length is 18 31/64".




Under BG-1 add:
EVIDENCE: Since this is a very important image and the status of BG-1-OP-2 as an origi-
nal is very important for collectors who want to assemble a complete set of original printings,
I have been asked numerous times what the evidence is which justifies my declaring OP-2 an
original. If I were to include the evidence for all images, this Guide would be several times its
current size so I cannot and will not do that, but in this case, I believe it is appropriate. First I
have seen a copy of BG-1-OP-2 bearing the stamp “Approved for posting Associated Students
San Francisco State University.” This poster was obviously posted prior to the concert.
Jacaeber Kastor of Psychedelic Solution has also seen another copy bearing a similar stamp.
Second in the late 1970s when I interviewed the artist who created and printed this image, Peter
Bailey, he told me that when he showed the poster to Bill Graham, Graham objected to Bailey’s
credit as artist and demanded that he print more without the credit. Bailey told me that he did so
and that these were delivered to Bill Graham Presents prior to the concert and posted to adver-
tise the concert.

After BG-2-RP-3 add:
BG-2-RP-4    In 2013 the artist who created this image, Wes Wilson, did a reprint of his own of the Batman image. This was printed on a stock with a gold foil front and a white reverse.
                       This was a limited edition, signed and numbered, 1 to 55. He also created giclee prints of the Batman image at this time, but these vary in size to custom order. 14 1/64 x 21 1/16"

After BG-2-RPC-B add:
BG-2-PHB-C     In 2009 I encountered a pirate handbill of the Batman image. It was printed not long before I saw it using printing equipment current in 2009. It is on orange stock, not
                           tan like the original handbill. It is most easily distinguished by its size which is much larger than the original. 8 17/32” x 11 1/64”


After the essay at the end of BG-2 "THE BATMAN POSTER" add
Every time I think I have dealt with the Batman poster, BG-2, for the last time, a few years goes by, and some new problem arises.

In 2013 I learned that the distinction in my Guide for the original Batman isn't quite as bullet proof as I had thought. The distance described in the Guide now appears to be little more than modestly useful.

Fortunately while in the process of discovering this, I managed to observe something which hopefully will prove more reliable.

The reason the distance described in the Guide, 18 11/16" from the upper right corner of the "t" in "Presents" to the bottom of the "y" in "Berkeley," is not absolutely, perfectly reliable has to do with new factors entering the sphere of poster description.

First this poster was printed on a rather poor grade of paper, and even with no other factors, it seems this paper often has been subject to minor shrinkage over the forty-seven plus years since the original was printed. Numerous copies that clearly are originals have appeared where the measurement is at least an eighth of an inch less, but this is not the worst of it.

Second this poster was often severely damaged by stoned hippies who had no idea that four decades later some copies of this poster would be worth more than $20,000.00, and that condition was going to be extremely important. To requote one of the best lines about this material I ever have heard, one said by Jacaeber Kastor in a moment of brilliant insight, "All these guys who fucked everything that walked, now want virgins." What this has led to is a great deal of work for paper restoration experts who will work wonders in the process of restoring the virtues of these sadly damaged ladies. The problem for identifying originals is that among the tools employed by these plastic surgeons of soil, tack holes, and tears are a variety of baths involving water, bleach, and occasionally other solvents. While these newly near mint nearly virgins come out of these baths looking delightfully pure, they also most likely have shrunk, in some cases more than 3/16" of an inch.

Recently such a copy led an investor who purchased one of these restored near virgins to believe that the poster he had spent as much money on as my parents paid to buy a nice house in New Jersey in 1953 was a forgery, a very, very serious charge, and if he had been correct, one that would go a long way toward destroying the investment potential of this material.

Luckily in the process of examining this specific copy and comparing it to two copies which are of known provenance, I noticed that the paper stock was very unusual. On the reverse all three, the two I brought with me and the copy under suspicion, had a diagonal woven or "rows"  texture. The diagonal lines in this woven texture on the back went from upper left to lower right. Neither
BG-2-RP-2 nor BG-2-RP-3 have anything like this diagonal woven texture.

I urge all serious dealers, collectors, and investors in this material who own copies of BG-2-OP-1 to look at the back of their copies obliquely and see what I am describing. This will go a long way to clearing up what is and is not an original. I can not imagine that at this late date a forger would be able to find a quantity of this odd, low quality stock, photograph a genuine original, burn a new plate, and print a forgery so detailed that no one could notice the loss of detail which is inescapable in reproduction.

Let us go forward into the now slightly less obscure fog.




After BG-2 add:
                      This is the image which looks a lot like BG-1. This is not a numbered item.

                       4/1&2/1966                                Fillmore Auditorium

                       Peter Bailey                               Jefferson Airplane
                      Quicksilver Messenger Service  4/1/1966
                      The Family Tree   4/2/1966



Since the first edition of this Guide I have resisted including this image in the Guide. The reason is simple. This section of the Guide deals with the posters, postcards and handbills which were assigned numbers in the Bill Graham series by the original copyright holder, Bill Graham.
He never assigned a number to this image, and out of respect for his decisions, I have not included it.

There were lots of midweek and other events put on at the Fillmore Auditorium by Bill Graham and by others whom he allowed to use the venue. Many of these were advertised by posters, postcards and handbills, but Bill Graham did not assign them numbers in his series so they are not included in this Guide. There were hundreds of these different pieces of concert promotional material, and the above image is only one of them.

Unfortunately in this case this omission has added to the confusion surrounding this image, and the purpose of this Guide is to clear up confusion, not add to it, so I now am including information about this image.

What happened is simple. Bill Graham booked the above concert, and Peter Bailey was assigned the task of creating the promotional material for it, in this case a handbill. He already had created an image for the Jefferson Airplane at the Fillmore Auditorium, and he decided to save himself some trouble by recycling the image for that event, Fillmore/Bill Graham number one, (BG-1). He changed the dates and added the accompanying acts for this pair of concerts.

The confusion arises from the fact that it looks a lot like BG-1, but it obviously is not BG-1, nor is it a variant of BG-1. It is a new image that is not required for a complete set of Bill Graham numbered handbills. On other occasions Bill Graham recycled images such as BG-215 to create BG-215A, and these are required for a complete set of numbered Bill Graham items, but these are required because Bill Graham assigned them numbers in his set. Since he did not assign this image a number, it is not part of the numbered series, just one of the multitude of images for miscellaneous concerts to which he did not assign a number.

It also should be noted that there are unnumbered images which were used to create posters, postcards and handbills for numbered events which also had other, numbered posters, postcards and handbills. Those images are not included in this Guide for the same reason this image is not. Those images were not assigned numbers even if the events listed on them were.

This item only was printed once and only as a handbill. No poster is know to exist for it.







Under BG-5-OP-1 change "left" to "right."
After BG-7-RP-2 add After BG-7-RPC-C add
"BG-7-PPC-D See BG-7-PP-3 for information about the pirate card."
After BG-8-RP-2 add: Under BG-8-OHB-A  add an asterisk after "...show on the reverse*"
Under BG-8-OHB-E add
"This paper is similar in color to the stock used for BG-2-OHB-A, BG-11-OHB-A, BG-13-OHB-A and BG-17-OHB-A."
Under BG-8-RPC-G change "1993" to "1996."

After BG-8-RPC-G add

"BG-8-OHB-H This item is on pale yellow paper with a review reverse."
BG-8-RPC-I     In 2004 Matthew Marks Gallery in New York City used this image for a card announcing an exhibition of psychedelic posters.
                         4 7/32" x 6 1/32"
BG-8-RHB-J      In 2005 Brad Kelly pointed out to me that in 2002 Chronicle Books and the Andy Warhol Foundation issued a box of copies of Andy Warhol memorabilia. It was called The Andy Warhol Pop Box. Among the items in this box was a copy of the BG-8 handbill printed in black ink on pale yellow paper. There is no review on the reverse which is blank. Since I have never seen an original of this handbill on yellow paper, I believe this description alone should be enough to prevent someone from offering this as an original. 5 17/32” x 8 33/64”

After BG-8 notes add: *There also exists a handbill for this event which is only a version of the Los Angeles Times review printed on pale pink paper without any version of the BG-8 image on the other side. This handbill is not included in the numbering system of this Guide because this Guide is limited to items which bear the images designated by number by the original copyright holder, Bill Graham Presents. Nevertheless collectors should be aware this version exists.
This version adds, “Coming to the Fillmore Auditorium” in the upper right corner and, “FRI., SAT. + SUN. MAY 27, 28, 29” in the lower right corner. Also on this version the vertical lettering “Los Angeles Times” in the upper right corner is not solid black lettering as it is on the handbills with the BG-8 image on the other side. In this case this lettering is hollow.











Under BG-9 change the text to read:
BG-9-OP-1    The original poster bears union logo #72 in the lower left corner.  The diagonal measurement from the upper left corner of the image above and left of the “B” in “Bill” to
                       the lower right corner of the image below and right of the “O” in “San Francisco” is 22 29/64” on the genuine original. See BG-9-PP-3. At the time of the discovery of
                       BG-9-PP-3 I also learned that the original of this poster was printed on at least three different stocks of paper. One fluoresces brightly under black light, one turns gray, and
                      one does not fluoresce at all. 14 1/64” x 20 1/64”    
BG-9-RP-2    The reprint has no union logo.  "#9" appears to the right of "o" in "San Francisco."  14 1/32” x 20 7/32”
BG-9-PP-3*   In 2009 it was discovered that at least 30 years ago someone created a pirate poster of this image which includes the union logo #72. The measurement described under
                      BG-9-OP-1on this version of the image is 22 15/64.” This is a difference of almost 1/4.” All copies of this poster with the union logo #72 should be checked to see if they
                      are pirate copies because this pirate printing is a very difficult one to distinguish other than with reference to this dimension. 13 27/32” x 19 53/64”
BG-9-OHB-A    The handbill is in monochromatic blue on thin white paper with union logo #72 below "Tickets."  5 17/32” x 8 17/32”
BG-9-RPC-B    The postcard printed in 1967 is similar in image to the poster but with no union logo.  4 51/64” x 6 1/2”
BG-9-RPC-C    Some "postcards" have a blank back.  4 25/32” x 6

B. G. 9
This poster is green, gray and blue on a white background.  The image is a mushroom shape surrounded by circles.  Most of the lettering is on the mushroom. This poster announces the first appearance by the Grateful Dead at the Fillmore Auditorium.

*  This pirate poster looks so much like the correct original that it is likely that some collections of originals include this pirate and not the correct original. It is almost impossible to notice that this poster is different from the original unless the two are held side by side which I believe is why it has been out there for at least thirty and perhaps forty years without anyone noticing it. It only was  discovered by accident when Dave Lawrence was looking at two copies of what he thought were originals, and he noticed that one was slightly smaller. He sent them to me for close examination, and I was able to determine that it was not a pirate that had been done recently. 

I determined that this pirate poster was printed by offset lithography, that is, on a press with a printing plate that rolled on the ink, not with a modern inkjet printer which sprays on the ink.
This means that it is extremely unlikely it was done in the last twenty years.

Because of the difference in size of the image to the original, it can be stated that it was not printed with the same printing plates or from the same film as the original, but because of the clarity of the image and the dot screen, it is very possible that the pirate who printed this poster had access to the original artwork by Wes Wilson. It should be noted that this does not in any way mean that Wes Wilson is implicated in this piracy. At this time it was common practice for the artists to leave their artworks with printers in case the copyright holder asked for reprints. What is most likely is that some unscrupulous print shop employee reprinted this image without the knowledge or consent of anyone in authority. Both Wes Wilson and Bill
Graham were victims here.

It should be noted that as early as 1967 I encountered people who were printing these postersillegally. I would estimate that the pressrun of this pirate probably was several hundred, so it is likely that lots of copies of it survive, and that now that its existence has been documented, several copies will turn up in collections which were thought to contain originals. Buyers of
BG-9 originals henceforth should be very careful to measure the diagonal distance described under BG-9-OP-1 to be sure that they are getting a genuine original and not this pirate.

I checked one other possibility, that this was a very early reprint. If this had been the case, at least some copies would survive in the inventory of Wolfgangs Vault as do copies of all the
other very early reprints. Grant Feichtmeier of Wolfgangs Vault was kind enough to check their inventory for me, and no copies of this variant were found. I consider this reasonable proof that this variant was not printed under the authority of Bill Graham before 1975 when he stopped reprinting the posters.



Under BG-10-RPC-B add: "The back of this card has the words "place stamp here" above a blacked out bulk mail permit.

After BG-11-RPC-C add:
"BG-11-RPC-D Some copies of the uncoated index cards have a blank reverse."
Under BG-12 acts delete Great Society. They did not play this concert.
Under BG-12-RP-3 add: It should be noted that there is no union logo on this poster, a clear indication that the blue backed posters were printed by a different shop
          than the other early printings.
Change "BG-12-RPC-B" to BG-12-OHB-B"

Under BG-12-RPC-C add "The back of this card has the words "place stamp here" above a blacked out bulk rate permit.

After BG-12-RPC-C add: "BG-12-RPC-D Some postcards have a blank reverse."

After BG-12-RPC-D add:  BG-12-RPC-E   Some postcards have the bulk mail permit without the “place stamp here” imprint covering it.


Change BG-13 cards to read:
 
It now appears that the postcard was printed twice, once with BG-13-RP-3 and once with BG-13-RP-4. The cards were printed in threes alongside the posters. Each of the three     is distinguishable from the other two by printing flaws. Furthermore each printing was cut two different ways. This gives a total of twelve different possible cards. Two (for the number of printings which were on different paper) times three (for the number of different printing flaw variations) times two (for the number of different cuttings) equals twelve. The paper possibilities are either vellum or index depending on whether the card was printed with BG-13-RP-3 or BG-13-RP-4. The flaw possibilities are either no print flaw, a vertical purple arc flaw 1/8" long above the "ea" in "Geary" or a small 1/32" purple blob located 3/16" below the "a" in "at." The cut sizes are either less than 7 1/2" height (short) or longer than 8" (long).

Under BG-15 Acts add *Sons of Champlin
*In October 2008 at the TRPS (The Rock Poster Society) annual swap meet Grant McKinnon of San Francisco Rock Posters and Collectibles showed me a scrapbook of small photographs taken by a woman who had attended several of the early Fillmore Ballroom concerts. In this scrapbook was the handbill for this concert by the Turtles and photographs of the Turtles, Oxford Circle and the Sons of Champlin. She had said to him that the Sons of Champlin definitely had played at this show.



Under BG-16-OP-1 change "Wison" to "Wilson."

Under BG-16-RP-3 change "Wess (sic) Wilson 16" to "Wess (sic) Wilson 66."

Under BG-16 Add to BG-16-RPC-C

Under BG-16 After BG-16-RPC-C Add: "BG-16-RPC-D Under BG-17 after BG-17-RP-2 add
BG-17-RP-3 This reprint is also blue on the reverse. "#17" has been added after the Wilson ‘66 credit. 13 31/32" x 19 15/16"

Change BG-18 posters to read:
BG-18-OP-1A    The original printings of this poster bears all three of the following characteristics:  The reverse side of the paper is white.  The lettering "Wes Wilson '66" is dark red matching the color of dark red in the ticket outlet strip.  Paper thickness is less than .008".  One variant of the original is on .0065” stock which has a pronounced floresence or glow under black light.
    13 15/16” x 19 31/32”
BG-18-OP-1B   Another has a moderate, even floresence under black light and is on stock in the .0075” to .0080” range. 14 3/32 “ x 20 5/32”
BG-18-OP-1C    A third has no floresence under black light. This also is on stock in the  .0075” to .0080” range. 13 63/64” x 20 7/64”
BG-18-RP-2    The reverse of the second printing is blue.  The green is an olive green.  "#18" does not appear (see BG-18-RP-3).  13 23/32” x 19 45/64”
BG-18-RP-3    The reverse of this, the third printing is also blue.  Green is a rich, dark maple tree leaf green.  "#18" appears after "Wes Wilson '66".
    13 63/64” x 19 31/32”
BG-18-RP-4    The reverse of the fourth printing is white.  On this and only this printing "Wes Wilson '66" appears in a bright red matching the red of the image lettering, not the dark red of red over green of the ticket outlets strip as it is on all the other printings. 13 1/2” x 20 1/64” and 13 45/64” x 20 7/64”
BG-18-RP-5    The last printing is white on the reverse and has "Wes Wilson '66" in dark red like the ticket outlets strip.  Paper stock is thicker than .009".  This is the same paper stock, smooth uncoated index as most of the first printings of BG-54 through BG-149 inclusive. 13 29/32” x 20”
BG-18-OP-6    A few copies of an original on .0065” stock which has a pronounced glow under black light (See BG-18-OP-1.) got a very light saturation of the red probably due to the reservoir of the press running out of  red ink. This created an appearance of “pink,” but under high magnification it can be seen to be red. These have no ticket outlets strip or Bill Graham or Wes Wilson credits. The reason for this is that the green was printed over the red, and the “pink” was so faint as to be obliterated by the green which went over it.
    13 15/16” x 19 31/32”

BG-18-PP-7       In 2006 an ebay seller who later stopped selling on ebay created two pirate versions of this image as a poster. One was an enlarged version of the handbill, blue on an off white background. Both pirates can be distinguished by the absence of the Wes Wilson credit next to the “3” in the date. 18 29/32” x 24 1/64”

BG-18-PP-8       This pirate also done in 2006 by the same pirate who did BG-18-PP-7 follows an appoximation of the original poster colors,  but the                            Wilson credit is also missing here.  18 29/32" x  24"



Under BG-19 After BG-19-OHB-E Add:

"BG-19-OHB-F This item is purple ink on yellow paper."        
BG-19-OHB-G This item is purple ink on tan paper. 5 1/2" x 8 17/32" 



IMPORTANT CORRECTION REGARDING BG-21:
SINCE THIS IS A MAJOR CORRECTION, IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS ABOUT THIS, PLEASE EMAIL ME.
PLEASE CHANGE THE TEXT OF BG-21 POSTERS TO READ:
BG-21-OP-1    In late 2005 while doing research in the inventory of Wolfgangsvault, I discovered conclusive evidence that the poster formerly identified as
       BG-21-OP-1 was actually a very early reprint. While most of the information in this Guide iS stable and not likely ever to change, occasionally new discoveries
       occur which necessitate major changes in the Guide. Due to this discovery the designation “BG-21-OP-1” has been eliminated from this Guide.
BG-21-OP-1A   The only original printing of this poster is on vellum which is .0090” thick. The back of this stock floresces or glows under black light. The easiest
      way to distinguish this item is a small, horizontal green line through the first “T” in “Tickets” in the bottom left corner.  There is some variation to the colors,
      especially the green, of this item. 13 29/32” x 20 9/64”
BG-21-RP-2A    The poster formerly identified as BG-21-OP-1 is actually an early reprint which predates BG-21-RP-2. This is its new designation. This item is on
      index which is .0080” or less in thickness. The back does not glow or floresce under black light, and it does not have the green line described under
      BG-21-OP-1A. There is some variation to the colors, especially the green of this item. 13 57/64” x 20 1/8”
BG-21-RP-2    This reprint is on uncoated index similar to that used for most originals from number 54 to number 149.  This reprint is .0090" thick or thicker. The
      back of this index reprint will not glow or floresce under black light. It does not have the green line described under BG-21-OP-1A. The colors of this item are
      more consistent than those of  BG-21-OP-1A and BG-21-RP-2A. 13 29/32” x 20 1/8”


Under BG-22 change the date to read "8/10/66."
Under notes BG-22 change "right" to "left."

Change BG-23-OP-1 to read:
BG-23-OP-1-A    This is the first of the posters discussed in the Bill Graham preface which have the "Friday/Monday" effect. The originals are on relatively porous stocks compared to the third
                             printing. These both have color on the reverse from posters coming off the press not quite dry and picking up some color from the sheet printed immediately before. Both
                             versions have the credit "Wes Wilson '66" in the blue/purple background below "Aug. 13".  In 2011 it became possible to distinguish the two variants of BG-23-OP-1. The first
                             of these variant originals will now be known as BG-23-OP-1-A. This original is distinguished by the fact that the back will floresce or glow under black light. Very minute plate
                             marks prove that both versions were printed with the same printing plates, but the ink used on the background was changed between the two versions. On this one the
                             background is lighter and has a bit of purple in it.  14 7/32” x  20 3/64”
BG-23-OP-1-B  The second version of the original is on stock which does not floresce or glow under black light. The background is more dark and blue than BG-23-OP-1-A. The reason it was so
                             confusing and it was not possible to distinguish these two variant originals before now is that during the printing process of the second version, the blue background plate was
                             allowed to get very dirty and clogged.
                             This resulted in a great range of clarity to lack of clarity of the dot screen of the photographs. These are not separate printings, clear and fuzzy. There is a range of examples
                             running from clear to fuzzy. For example, on this version what the viewer sees as the left cheek of the left most figure in the upper photograph can be anything between  solid  
                             color to finely shaded dot screen. 14 13/64” x  19 15/16”


Change BG-25 posters to read:

BG-25-OP-1           The back of the original printing of this poster will floresce or glow under black light. 13 11/16” x 21 3/32”

BG-25-RP-2    In 2006 after considerable study of reprints of BG-25, I realized that there were two separate reprints of BG-25. Neither reprint will floresce or glow on the back under black light. The evidence for two reprints is the difference in the color red from BG-25-RP-2 to BG-25-RP-3 as well as different paper stocks.  The distinguishing characteristics are print flaws, but the consistent color difference and paper stock difference are the best evidence. On this item the horizontal red print flaw described under BG-25-RP-3 does not appear. In previous editions this Guide described a saw tooth projection which it now appears is not a useful distinction. The best way to distinguish BG-25-RP-2 from
    BG-25-RP-3 is the presence or absence of the horizontal red print flaw described under BG-25-RP-3. Under black light the back of this poster has a distinct gray tone.
    13 37/64” x 21”

BG-25-RP-3    This item will not floresce or glow on the back under black light. On BG-25-RP-3 there is a horizontal red print flaw through the top of the second “e” in “Elevator.” Under black light the back of this poster has a white tone. 13 45/64” x 20 61/64”

After BG-25-RP-3 add:  BG-25-PP-4  In 2011 a pirate selling on the internet bootlegged this poster. The stock used was glossy. The size is the distinguishing characteristic. 12” x 18”


After BG-25-PP-4 add:

BG-25-RP-5  In 2014 Wolfgang's Vault reprinted this poster on slick, glossy stock in a press run of 500. A "Wolfgang's Vault" credit appears in the lower right corner. 20 25/64" x 30 49/64"


BG-25-OHB-A This is the first handbill in the Bill Graham series which was a full color match of the poster.  It had a blank reverse and, like the poster was .0070" or less in thickness. 4 7/8” x 8 43/64”  

BG-25-RPC-B This postcard, printed in late 1966 or early 1967, matches poster BG-25-RP-2 and is .0075" or more in thickness.  It has a gray tone on the back under black light. 4 7/8” x 8 1/2”

BG-25-RPC-C   This postcard, probably printed later in 1967, matches BG-25-RP-3. It has a white tone on the back under black light. 4 7/8” x 8 1/2”

After BG-25 notes add:

In 2010 several of the serious students of the printing history of psychedelic posters raised questions about the accuracy of this Guide regarding BG-25. These questions arose because they occasionally had encountered piles of posters dating from the 1960s which were all or almost all originals except for the copy of BG-25 which, according to this Guide, was a reprint, BG-25-RP-2. Since BG-25 is one of the most confusing and difficult posters in the Bill Graham series to identify correctly, and since my designations of BG-25 posters are not based on later research but actual personal experience around the time of the concerts, I believe I ought to include this in the Guide so these questions will be answered once and for all.

    In late April or early May of 1966 I began saving these posters. By late May of 1966 I realized there was some kind of series, and I tried to acquire the earlier posters which I was missing. After finishing work on my Master's Degree in English Literature at the University of California Berkeley campus in June 1966, I left California for the summer. I returned around Labor Day to begin work on my Ph.D. As soon as I got back, I put up signs on telephone poles seeking to buy the posters I had missed during the summer. Almost immediately I encountered a man who had been taking down these posters from telephone poles all the way back to the King Kong, FD-2. Another way he had gotten these posters was out of store windows where they had been posted. Typically he would go into a store and ask for a poster, usually soon after it had been posted and well before the concerts. Many store owners did not want to keep these posters for themselves but felt they should keep the poster in their store window until after the concerts, so they would tell people like this man to put his initials on the poster, and they could come back and pick up the poster after the event.

    In the pile of posters I bought from this man in the middle of September 1966 was a copy of BG-25 on which his initials appear in ballpoint pen. This was about two or at most three weeks after the BG-25 concerts. Obviously this poster has to be an original because this copy had been posted in a store window before the concerts. I still own this copy, and I can not have mixed it up with another one because his initials are on it. Under black light the back of this poster will glow or floresce. The stock of this copy of BG-25 matches all the blank backed copies of the BG-25 handbill I ever have seen, all of which glow or floresce under black light. I am strongly inclined to believe that BG-25 was the first Bill Graham Presents poster to have been printed on a larger sheet with three handbills arranged vertically alongside the poster, hence the identical stock of original handbills and original posters. I will add more on this below.

    The issue has been raised as to whether BG-25-RP-2 might have been printed before the concerts and should be reclassified as an original since this is the version which has appeared in the piles in question. The answer is "no" for several reasons. First no blank backed copies of the handbill exist on the stock used for BG-25-RP-2, only "place stamp here" backs with the return address of the Fillmore Auditorium. This imprint did not appear on an original postcard until at least BG-38 postcards several months later, and the plate to imprint it reasonably can be presumed not to have existed until then.

    Second the stock used to print BG-25-OP-1 was an unusual one and only was used on one other original, BG-26-OP-1. What this implies is that enough of this stock was bought before the BG-25 event that there was some left over on which BG-26-OP-1 was printed. In all likelihood this means that there was enough of this stock to print all the copies of BG-25-OP-1 without having to use another stock to finish the press run.

    So why does BG-25-RP-2 occasionally turn up in piles of posters that mostly are originals (Most of the time runs of originals dating from the time of the concerts include BG-25-OP-1.)? In 2008 I got a good idea of why BG-25-RP-2 sometimes appears in these piles. I encountered a client who had inherited from his mother two sets of the earliest Bill Graham Presents posters. These sets were unusual in that his mother had told him specifically that she had never been to a concert,  had never been handed a poster in the street and had never taken one down from a telephone pole or out of a store window. All of her posters had come from a single source, a show of Wes Wilson posters at a gallery in November 1966. All the posters in these two sets were originals except for the BG-25s. One was an original, and one was a reprint, BG-25-RP-2.

    I asked Wes if I could interview him about this, and he most graciously consented (Thanks, Wes.). Wes remembered that this show was held at a small gallery called the Kelly Gallery and that this show was one in which he did not participate personally.  The owner had asked him for posters for this show, and Wes had sent him to both Bill Graham and West Coast Litho, the printer he was using at that time. Most of the posters came from Bill Graham's small inventory, but the printer apparently had just reprinted BG-25, so copies of BG-25-RP-2 were included in the show along with a handful of originals.

    The timing of this art show coincides with the first use of the "Bill Graham Presents / Fillmore Auditorium return address" postcard backprint, and this backprint was placed on this very early reprint, perhaps the first or second Bill Graham Presents poster reprinted (The Batman poster, BG-2, may have been reprinted a week or two earlier but by a different printer than BG-25.).

    Wes also told me something else about the original printing of the BG-25 poster and handbills. For some time preceding this poster he had wanted to experiment with something which became one of his signature design statements, color which extended to the edges of the poster. The printing presses at the earliest printers he used at that time, Bindweed Press and Double-H Press, did not have the capacity to run color to the edge of the sheet, so he moved to West Coast Litho where he worked with a pressman named Ivor Powell to produce the effect he wanted on BG-18-OP-1 and BG-23-OP-1. He also discovered that West Coast Litho had a substantially larger press than the ones on which he previously had been working. This gave him the idea to experiment with a larger sheet of paper on which he could print one poster with three handbills arranged vertically alongside the poster. This achieved a much more attractive full color handbill which was a smaller version of the poster, a product much more interesting than the separately printed monochromic handbills to which he had been restricted until that time. It appears the BG-25 was the first time he tried this idea, hence the fact that all the original posters must match the stock of the original blank backed handbills. If a large quantity of other paper had been used before the event, there would have to be a substantial number of blank backed handbills on that stock. There are not. There only are postcard back versions on the stock of BG-25-RP-2 so BG-25-RP-2  can not be an original.

    For the record the same thing is true of BG-25-RP-3 (No blank backed copies of a handbill exist on the stock of BG-25-RP-3 either, only postcard backed versions.) which has to be a reprint for another reason as well. There are too many copies of BG-25-RP-3 in the inventory of Wolfgangs Vault for it to be an original. Wolfgangs Vault owns the remainder of the inventory of Bill Graham Presents, and there is no way that Bill Graham Presents would have saved that many copies of a poster at the time of that concert. This is the same reason I had to change the designation of what I had thought was a variant original of BG-21 but which turned out to be a very early reprint. There just were too many copies of it in the Wolfgangs Vault inventory, and Bill Graham was not saving hundreds of copies of posters at the time of that concert, and BG-25 dates only four weeks later. Bill Graham Presents did not start saving large quantities of originals until months later.

    I hope this settles the confusion and debate about the printing history of BG-25-OP-1.




 



Under BG-26-RPC-D add:

This card is cut similarly to BG-26-OHB-A with a 1 1/8" wide border above the image and a narrow border below."

After BG-26-RPC-D add:

Under BG-27 change artist from "Wes Wilson" to "John H. Myers."

Under BG-27-RP-3 change the sentence beginning "Cut lengths..." to read "Cut sizes vary substantially." Add 14 25/64" x 20 23/64" to the dimensions.

After BG-28-OP-1 add:

After BG-29-RP-6 add:
BG-29-RP-7       In 2011 Wolfgangs Vault, the current holder of the copyrights on Bill Graham
    Presents posters from the psychedelic era, reprinted this poster. The purple
    version was used as a basis for this new reprint. A “Wolfgangs Vault” credit
    appears in the lower right corner. 20” x 37”


Under BG-29-OHB-B add “Some copies of this handbill have a printing flaw where the background green infringes on the lower legs of the figure.”

This entry replaces any previous BG-30 entry.
 
BG-30  
10/7 & 8/66  Winterland
Wes Wilson Butterfield Blues Band
Jefferson Airplane
Grateful Dead

 

        BG-30-OP-1* Previously I had described the original of this poster as being the
        blue/green version with a faint lightening of color at a specific point in the left
        margin. In 2002 I discovered this was incorrect. Although the blue/green variants
        are originals, there are pure blue originals, too. Henceforth originals are to be
        distinguished by the presence of substantial red ink backprint of the upper two
        flowers, the ones located at the top of the poster (Backprint is ink on the reverse
        of a poster picked up from the previous copy as the next copy came off the press
        because the previous copy was not yet dry.). Some originals may have red
        backprint from the swirl and/or other flowers, but minimally there will be
        backprint from the upper two flowers. The presence or lack thereof of blue
        backprint is not relevant. Because the front image of the poster appears on the back
        of BG-30-RP-2, it can be noted additionally that the back of the original  does not
         flouresce or glow under black light. 11 53/64" x 24 3/8" and 11 27/32" x 24 17/64"

        BG-30-RP-2 The second printing, a reprint, is on porous stock similar to vellum.
        It has no red backprint from the upper two red flowers. The back of the reprint
        flouresces or glows under black light. 11 7/8" x 24 11/32"

        BG-30-RP-3  The third printing is on uncoated index similar to that used for Bill
        Graham originals between number 54 and number 149. It does not have the red
        backprint. 11 53/64" x 24 9/32"

        BG-30-OHB-A This handbill appears in two variants. The first is on paper .0055"
        thick. On this variant "In Advance: $3.00" and "At the Door: $3.50" are in white
        letters on blue background. The blue is a pure blue without the slight green tinge
        of the original poster. 4 1/4" x 8 11/32"

        BG-30-OHB-B This variant handbill is .0080" thick. "In Advance: $3.00 and "At
        the Door: $3.50" appear in blue lettering on a white background. This blue also is
        relatively pure and lacking the slight green tinge of the original poster. 4 5/16" x
        8 1/4"

        BG-30-RPC-C The postcard is on the .0080" stock of BG-30-RP-2. Colors match
         BG-30-RP-2. "In Advance: $3.00" and "At the Door: $3.50" appear in blue
        letters on a white background. This card was cut to two different sizes. This one
        measures c. 4 7/16" x 8 1/4". 4 7/16" x 8 19/64"

        BG-30-RPC-D This card is identical to BG-30-RPC-C except the top and bottom
        borders are narrower. It measures c. 4 7/16" x 7 3/4". 4 27/64" x 7 49/64"

        BG-30-RPC-E In 1977 Bill Graham Presents backstamped a number of copies of
         BG-30-RPC-C to use as a New Year’s card, "WARM WISHES FOR A GREAT 1978;
        CHEERS, BILL GRAHAM AND THE F.M. FAMILY. THIS IS AN ORIGINAL FILLMORE
        HANDBILL PRINTED IN 1966." Actually it has a postcard reverse, not a blank
        (handbill) reverse. 4 7/16" x 8 9/32"

B. G. 30
This poster is red, blue, white and black on a blue background. It makes use of one of the more
popular psychedelic icons, a circle made up of swirling arcs.

* Since this represents a substantial widening of the definition of a BG-30 original, users of this
Guide are entitled to ask why this change has been made. I acquired my own original from a
bulletin board in the Telegraph Avenue area of Berkeley within a day or two after the concerts. It
is the blue/green variant. The four or five other collectors I knew by mid-1967 all had copies
acquired in similar fashion. All were blue/green. I later saw pure blue ones on the same paper
stock, but I assumed these were later printings because I never saw transitional copies which
would indicate a change in ink during the press run (When the printer did not have enough of a
specific ink for an entire press run, they would often start with one color and when the ink
reservoir ran low, they would add ink of a slightly different color. This would produce posters of a
color part way between color one and color two. When the reservoir again ran low, more of color
two would be added producing a purely color two variant. The existence of transitional copies,
ones part way between two color variants, is generally evidence of one printing during which the
color of the ink was changed. ).

Recently I have seen several transitional copies. I take this as clear evidence of
one printing, both blue/green and blue. All of them are on the same paper stock, one
characterized by a fine pattern of "rows" or "woven" texture on the back. My experience has
been that this paper stock is difficult for most people to distinguish, so I looked for another
distinguishing characteristic. What I found that all the originals had in common but which
appeared on none of the reprints was the backprint of the upper two red flowers. I also add
that the back of the original does not flouresce or glow under black light while BG-30-RP-2
does.

I note in passing that previously this image was one of only a handful in my Guide which was
different from the catalog of Mr. Jacaeber Kastor. He has long believed that the blue/green and
pure blue variants on "rows" stock are parts of the same press run, and I now agree with him.
What this means is that if we were both asked to sort a randomly chosen pile of 100 BG-30
posters into originals, first reprints and second reprints, we would sort them the same, and this
agreement is good news for collectors because it increases the stability of the hobby.

Under BG-31 change the text to read:
BG-31-OP-1    The original printing has "October 16" across the photograph and a black background behind "14" and "15".  13 17/32” x 23 5/8”    
BG-31-RP-2    The second printing, a reprint, has "October 16" across the photograph and a brown background behind "14" and "15".  13 19/32” x 23 19/32”
BG-31-RP-3    The third printing deletes "October 16" across the photograph.
    13 57/64” x 23 19/32”
BG-31-OHB-A    The original handbill matches BG-31-OP-1. 4 21/32” x 8 7/32”
BG-31-RPC-B    The earlier postcard in silver matches BG-31-RP-2. 4 41/64” x 8 13/64”
BG-31-RPC-C    The later postcard in gold matches BG-31-RP-3. 4 41/64” x 8 13/64”
    (It is not a typographical error that these copies of BG-31-RPC-B and
    BG-31-RPC-C are exactly the same size.)
BG-31-RPC-D   In 2010 I learned that there is a variant of the postcard that matches
    BG-31-RP-3. This variant has the “October 16” across the photograph. The way to identify this variant is by thickness. It is .0090” thick. Also the printingwith the date is in gold ink. On
    BG-31-RPC-B this printing is in silver-platinum colored ink. Since this poster was printed with three postcards alongside the poster, the explanation for the existence of a substantial number of
    postcards with the “16” but no posters is that when altering the printing plateto remove the “16,” the “16” was removed from the poster and two of the postcards, but the "16" was left on the
    plate, probably by accident, on one of the cards. The other possibility is that the film was altered before the burning of the plate for the gold ink, the "16" was removed from the poster and two
    of the postcards, but accidentally left on one of the postcards.

B.G. 31 This poster is silver or gold, dark brown and white on a light brown background. In the center is a photograph of Big Mama Mae Thornton.

Change BG-32-OP-1 to read: "This item is on index which is from .0075" to .0085" thick."

After BG-32-RP-5 add:

Under BG-33 add "Gered Mankowitz (Photographer)"

Under BG-33 change the text to read:
logo and adds "Printing by West Coast Lithograph Co., SF" in the right margin near the bottom. The stock of this  version is very similar to that of 
    BG-33-RPC-C. 13 61/64” x 20”
BG-33-RP-3    The third printing on slick, coated stock less than.0060" thick deletes the union logo and retains the West Coast credit. 13 31/32” x 19 63/64”
BG-33-PP-4    The pirate printing done in 1987 is distinguished by the almost complete loss of gray tones from the faces of the Yardbirds.  On all the authorized posters the faces are quite subtly shaded.  On the pirate these areas are white or black except for the right (viewer's right) side of the right face which has some limited shading. 13 63/64” x 20 1/16”
BG-33-RP-5      In 2014 Dennis King showed me a copy of this poster on a more porous stock
    similar to vellum. It is .0085” thick. It also deletes the union logo and retains
    the credit “Printing by West Coast Lithograph Co., SF” in the lower right margin. While examining what are now the three versions of the lawful reprint, it
    became apparent that this version is on identical stock to BG-33-RPC-B.
    Both have identical texture, and both fluoresce or glow brightly under black
    light. Since none of the reprints or postcards are on the stock used for Bill
    Graham originals from number 54 to 149, it is reasonable to assume all these
    versions of BG-33 were done before March 1967 which is only four months
    after this event. Since it is extremely unlikely Bill Graham would have had this
    poster reprinted several times in only four months, and since the cut sizes of
    all these reprints are virtually identical, it seems logical that they all represent
    one printing on different stocks.
BG-33-OHB-A    The original handbill on thin white paper has union logo #221 in the lower left corner. 5 35/64” x 8 33/64”
BG-33-RPC-B     One printing of the postcard is on vellum c. 4 7/16 x 7 5/8".  Some copies of this were poorly printed and have a very muddy image.  Some are clear.  No union logo appears.
   4 29/64” x 7 39/64” and 4 7/16” x 7 39/64”
BG-33-RPC-C    Another printing of the postcard is on index c. 4 1/2" x 6 7/8".  All known copies of this card are printed clearly.  No union logo appears.
    4 1/2” x 6 27/32”
BG-33-RPC-D    Some copies of BG-33-RPC-C failed to get a backprint and are blank on the reverse.  They are not original handbills.  They do not bear the union logo.
    4 1/21” x 6 27/32”
BG-33-RPC-E   While I have not seen a copy of a post card backed version of this image on
    stock similar to BG-33-RP-3, it would seem possible that one exists.



Under BG-33-RPC-C change "vellum" to "index".

Under BG-36-OHB-A change "3 1/32"" to "3 3/8"."

Change the postcards section of BG-36 to read:

BG-36-RPC-D Before 1999 it was incorrectly thought that all postcards of BG-36 had small lettering. This item has small lettering. This item has the "P" in "Presented" well to the right of the gap between the "B" and the "O" in "Bola." This item is on .0080" stock. There is substantial color variation among cards on this stock.

BG-36-RPC-E This item has small lettering. The "P" in "Presented" is very slightly to the left of the gap between the "B" and the "O" in "Bola." It has the shoulder printing flaw. This item is on .0080" stock.

BG-36-RPC-F This item has small lettering. This item has the "P" in "Presented" well to the right of the gap between the "B" and the "O" in "Bola." It is on .0090" stock. The cards on .0090" stock tend to be much more consistent in color. This card matches BG-36-RP-3.

BG-36-RPC-G This item has small lettering. The "P" in "Presented" is slightly to the left of the gap between the "B" and the "O" in "Bola" It has the shoulder printing flaw. This item is on .0090" stock. This card matches BG-36-RP-3. No postcards are known to match BG-36-RP-4.

BG-36-RPC-H This postcard reverse item has large lettering. It is on .0080" stock.

BG-36-RPC-I This postcard reverse item has large lettering. It is on .0090" stock matching BG-36-RP-3.

After BG-37-RP-2 add:
BG-37-RP-3   In 2014 Wolfgang's Vault reprinted this poster on slick, glossy stock in a press run of 500. A"Wolfgang's Vault" credit appears in the lower right corner. 20 7/16" x 35 11/16"

After BG-37-RPC-D add
BG-37-OHB-E Some copies of BG-37-OHB-A were stamped with a rubber stamp bulk mail permit, mechanically addressed and sent to people on the mailing list.   

Change the entire text of BG-38 to read:
BG-38-OP-1  The original of this poster was printed on at least three different stocks of paper.  It also varies considerably in gray and yellow/orange.  Each of the three
                       paper stock can be identified by thickness and by response to black light on the reverse..  This original is on stock between .0075" and .0080" thick. 
                      No original has the mark described under  BG-38-RP-4. Under black light the stock of this poster is almost the same as it appears under regular light.
                      13 15/32” x 21 5/64”

BG-38-OP-2  This original is on stock which is between .0080" and .0085" in thickness. Under black light the reverse turns a grayish purple. It does not have the mark
                      described under BG-38-RP-4. 13 27/64” x 21 1/8”

BG-38-OP-3  This original is on stock between .0085” and  .0090" in thickness. Like BG-38-OP-2 under black light the reverse turns grayish purple. It, too, does not
                       have the mark described under BG-38-RP-4. 13 7/16 x 21 13/64”

BG-38-RP-4. This  reprint was done during the period that most other last reprints of early posters was done, and it is on the same stock as most Bill Graham originals
                      from number 54 to number 149.  This stock is .0090” thick. Locate the “T” in “LOTHAR.” In the upper left corner of the left arm of the “T” is a very
                      faint almost horizontal line about 1/16” from the top and about 1/8” long. This also appears on BG-38-RP-6. The yellow/orange varies substantially and
                      the gray varies slightly. Three different color variants were measured, and all were identical within 1/64” 13 7/16” x 21”

BG-38-RP-5  In 1986 Wes Wilson reprinted this poster in entirely different colors, red, blue and orange.  "© 1986 Wes Wilson" appears in the lower left corner. The mark
                      in the “T” in  “LOTHAR” does not appear. 13 33/64” x 20 13/32”

BG-38-RP-6* In 2004 it was noticed that all originals and reprints of this image except for one produce no floresence or glow under black light. The back of this variant
                       reprint on .0085” stock has a pronounced mottled glow under black light. It has the mark in the “T” in “LOTHAR” described under BG-38-RP-4.
                       13 31/32” x 21 1/64”
                       In 2009 it was discovered that this printing was not a variant original as I had thought, but it was a very early reprint which dates before BG-38-RP-4.
                       Accordingly the designation BG-38-OP-6 has been changed to BG-38-RP-6.

BG-38-RP-7  In 2010 the current copyright holder of these Bill Graham posters, Wolfgang’s Vault, issued a large size reprint of this image on glossy, coated stock.. It
                      bears the notation  “Wolfgang’s Vault” in white ink in the lower right corner. 23 37/64” x 37 1/32”

BG-38-OHB-A The original handbill was printed only once.  Unlike the poster on which image color runs out to the edge, the handbill has a white border.  No copies of
                          this item are known to have been mailed to people on the mailing list. This item does not change color appreciably under black light. The stock matches 
                          BG-38-OP-1. 5 5/64” x 7 27/32”

BG-38-RPC-B This postcard matches the handbill image. On the back the stock fluoresces as does BG-38-RP-6. This card is a reprint. 5 5/64” x 7 27/32”

BG-38-RPC-C In 1986 Wes Wilson published a postcard matching BG-38-RP-5. 4 1/32” x 6”

BG-38-OHB-D In 2014 it was discovered that some blank backed handbills were on stock which turned grayish purple under black light. These match BG-38-OP-2 and
                          BG-38-OP-3.

BG-38-OPC-E On 2014 it was discovered that some postcard backed cards were on stock which turned grayish purple under black light matching BG-38-OP-2 and
                         BG-38-OP-3. Other than the postcard backprint these are identical to BG-38-OHB-D. These are the first small sized items to be backprinted with the Bill
                         Graham backprint before the concerts.

B. G. 38 This poster is orange and black on a gray background.  The handbill and the postcard are two shades of orange and black on a white background. The central image is a robed human figure extending a large peace symbol toward the viewer. This is the first image where the original printing bears the correct number.

*  *  *
After BG-38-RP-5 add
* BG-38-OP-6    In 2004 it was noticed that all originals and reprints of this image except for one produce no floresence or glow under black light. The back of this variant reprint on .0085” stock has a pronounced mottled glow under black light.  13 31/32” x 21 1/64”  In 2009 it was discovered that this printing was not a variant original as I had thought, but it was a very early reprint which dates before BG-38-RP-4. Accordingly the designation "BG-38-OP-6" has been changed to "BG-38-RP-6.

*             The evidence for BG-38-RP-6 being a reprint is conclusive. I had thought it was an original because I had thought the handbills for this image had been printed separately from the posters in the manner of, for example, BG-33 because they did not match the posters. They had no gray background. Also the paper stock of the handbills I owned seemed to match the postcards, so I had thought they were printed at the same time, that this was the first postcard back item printed before the show. Now it is clear that only some of the postcards match the stocks of some of the originals. The stocks of the blank backed handbills all match one or another of the stocks of the original posters.
        The confusion was resolved by my seeing the original printing plate which has the usual three postcards along side the poster. The plate was burned in such a way that the handbills/postcards did not get a gray imprint while the posters did. This meant that there were handbills which matched all three known original poster variants. I just had not seen all of them, and since I had not used black light to distinguish paper stocks when I did the original illustrated edition of this guide in 1996, I had not noticed that the paper stock of some of the postcards was actually quite different from that of the handbills. It is now clear that the stock of some of the postcards matches the stock of BG-38-RP-6, while the stocks of the handbills do not. They match the stocks of BG-38-OP-1, BG-38-OP-2 and BG-38-OP-3. In 2014 a postcard backed card sized item was discovered matching BG-38-OP-2 and BG-38-OP-3.
        Two other reasons make it clear that BG-38-RP-6 is an early reprint. First, the inventory of Wolfgangs Vault, which now in 2009 has the old Bill Graham inventory, contains too many copies of this variant for them to have been printed before the shows. Bill Graham Presents simply was not saving that many copies of posters printed before the shows this early in the era (This is similar to the way I was able to determine that what I had previously designated as BG-21-OP-1 was also a very early reprint.).
        Second, adding to the evidence is the fact that the stock of BG-38-RP-6 is identical to the stock of BG-35-RP-2, which always has been accepted as a very early reprint. The printers in this period did not store large quantities of paper in their shops. As Bill Graham ordered items printed, they went out and bought paper to print just the quantities he ordered. The paper stock of both BG-35-RP-2 and BG-38-RP-6 is rather unusual in the way it fluoresces under black light. It is reasonable to assume that Bill Graham ordered the reprinting of BG-35 and BG-38 at the same time, and that the printer bought paper to print both at the same time. Since the postcards of BG-35 match the stock of BG-35-RP-2, and there is no chance that these postcards predate the shows, it is logical that the same situation is involved with BG-38. These postcards came after the show which means the posters which match them also came after the shows.
        In 2014 a reliable means of distinguishing BG-38 originals from BG-38 reprints was discovered. None of the originals has the following mark in the “T” in “Lothar.” On the reprints except for BG-38-RP-5 in the upper left corner of the left arm of the “T” in “LOTHAR” there is a faint, almost horizontal line about 1/8” long about 1/16” down from the top of the “T.” This was checked on several dozen originals as well as hundreds of reprints, and it proved true in all cases. At the same time further research was done on postcards and handbills, and a new original handbill and a new original postcard were also discovered. The author of this Guide would like to thank Grant Feichtmeir of Wolfgangs Vault for his assistance in this matter.

After BG-38-RP-6 add:
BG-38-RP-7      In 2010 the current copyright holder of these Bill Graham posters, Wolfgang’s Vault, issued a large size reprint of this image on glossy, coated stock.. It bears the notation
                        “Wolfgang’s Vault” in white ink in the lower right corner. 23 37/64” x 37 1/32”




                                                                        




                                                                        


Under BG-40 change cards and handbills to read
Under BG-43-OHB-A  change the text to read: "This handbill matches BG-43-OP-1 except that the "Wes Wilson" credit is pink.
Under BG-43-OPC-C add to the text, "This postcard matches BG-43-OHB-A."
Under BG-43-OPC-C change the last sentence to read:
Some evidence exists that a least some copies of BG-43-OHB-A were folded into copies of the next mailer, BG-44-OHB-A and mailed stapled together, possibly with a copy of the MacLean handbill included, and a few of these are currently known to exist.
4 29/64" x 7 19/64" and 4 29/64" x 7 13/64"        


Under BG-44 change the text to read:

BG-44-OP-1-A    There is an almost bewildering variety to copies of this poster.  The lettering varies in steps from pure gray to a rich purple/blue.  On some copies the hair of the figure matches the lettering.  On others the hair is much darker.  The pink of the background varies from light to dark.  Stock used varies from .0080" to .0105".  Paper types run from porous vellum to index.  This is the "Monday/Friday, go buy more paper and ink" syndrome taken to its utmost extreme.  There are substantial variations among the handbills to match the posters.  It is reasonable to assume that all of these are originals, with only the exception described under BG-44-RP-2. 13 49/64” x 23 55/64” and
    13 27/32” x 23 3/4”
    In 2014 it was pointed out to me that the descriptions on the Wolfgangs Vault
    site listed separately each of the three paper stocks on which the original printing of BG-44 was printed. While I have known about these for decades, I never
    listed them because there already was so much potential confusion because of
    the color variations, but since the scholar who maintains the Wolfgangs Vault
    and I have concluded that we should try to see that there are no disagreements
between the site he maintains and my Guide, I will now list the three dif
            ferent paper stocks of BG-44 separately following the lead of his site.
            The first original printing is on stock that has a distinct woven or rows
                                     pattern on the back. The linear dimensions of this item vary, but the
            dimensions on the Wolfgangs Vault site are a reasonable average.
            13 13/16” x 23 3/4”  The thickness of this stock is .008”.
BG-44-OP-1-B    This version also varies dramatically in color. The stock is thicker and
            coarser without the woven/rows texture on the back. It does not glow or
            fluoresce on the back under black light. This lack of glow under black
            light is the means to distinguish this item from BG-44-OP-1-C.
            13 13/16” x 23 3/4”
BG-44-OP-1-C            This variant does not show woven or rows texture on the back. It does
            fluoresce brightly on the back when held under black light.
            13 7/8” x 23 11/16”
BG-44-RP-2                Since the paper stock used to print Bill Graham originals from number 54
                                    to 149 was never used to print originals before number 54, any copies of
                                    BG-44 on this stock would be reprints.  Such copies do exist. They are
                                    characterized by the usual hard, uncoated index surface of this stock.
            Unfortunately the stock used for the reprint also has a woven or rows
            texture on the reverse which could lead to them being confused with
            copies of BG-44-OP-1-A which is the only original with a woven or rows
            textured reverse. Fortunately these copies are on stock .009” to .0095” in
            thickness so the can be distinguished by this trait from BG-44-OP-1-A
            which is substantially thinner at .008”. In 2010 I had occasion to look at
            several hundred copies of the reprint. All of them had some degree of a
            horizontal blue smudge through the word “Tickets” in the lower left
            corner. This may prove to be the best signifier for the distinction between
            BG-44 originals and BG-44 reprints because no original I have seen has
            had this smudge. 13 3/4” x 23 45/64”
BG-44-OHB-A  The varieties described under BG-44-OP-1 are matched by the varieties among the handbills. 4 39/64” x 7 59/64” and 4 43/64” x 7 29/32”
BG-44-OHB-B    Some copies of BG-44-OHB-A were hand stamped with a rubber stamp bulk rate permit, addressed by addressograph and mailed to people on the mailing list. 
BG-44-OPC-C    Since postcards appear on the same stocks as handbills, it is reasonable to assume they were back printed before the concert.  No copies of the postcard are known to exist on the stock used for Bill Graham originals from number 54 to number 149. 4 43/64” x 7 29/32” and 4 43/64” x 7 31/32”
B. G. 44
This poster is gray and purple on a pink background.  There is considerable variation in the tones of the gray and the pink from  light to dark. The central image is a woman’s face.  This poster announces the first major San Francisco Bay Area appearances of the Doors.
 
*  *  *




                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      


After BG-45-RP-4 add
BG-45-PP-5       In 2003 an unauthorized use of this image was made by someone who
                           produced what they called a “Giclee” print. It was substantially larger than the
                           size of usual Fillmore posters, and a white border was added, but it was
                           cropped along the bottom so as to eliminate the ticket outlets strip. Colors
                           were somewhat paler than the correct green and bluish purple. It is unknown
                           how many of these were produced  before they were ordered by the copyright
                           holder to cease and desist. 17 57/64” x 24 3/64”

After BG-45-PP-5 add
BG-45-RP-6     In 2013 the current copyright holder, Wolfgang's Vault, reprinted this poster with a Wolfgang's Vault credit in the lower right corner. 23 1/8" x 36"
Under BG-45 notes add the following:
By May of 2006 there were only two remaining differences between this Guide and the printing history of this material according to the archivist of www.wolfgangsvault.com. BG-45 was one of these two. I went to the vault and presented my evidence regarding BG-45 to their archivist, and after we examined both posters in their archive and items I brought with me, he agreed to change their listings to conform with mine. Since this is a significant change for them, I believe the readers of this Guide are entitled to know what that evidence is.
Both BG-45-OP-1 and BG-45-OP-2 vary greatly in color. The purples in particular differ drastically from light purple to dark bluish purple on both BG-45-OP-1 and BG-45-OP-2. Preconcert copies of BG-45 posters were printed on a sheet with three small versions of the image arranged vertically along the side of the poster. For this reason copies of cards exist which match all the variations of the posters.
I did most of my collecting of variations from the late 1960s through the mid 1970s when this material was readily available and low priced compared to today’s values. Because I was fascinated with the color variations, I saved quite a few of them, more than half a dozen posters and as many cards and handbills. When I did my most recent study of BG-45, I noted that two different paper stocks were used on the items I list as originals in this Guide. The back of one
floresces or glows under black light. The other does not. Copies of OP-1 are on the florescent stock, and copies of OP-2 are on the non-florescent stock.
I have two copies of the mailer of this card, ones with a backprint with a bulk mail permit. These copies both have been addressed with an addressograph machine and mailed to people on the mailing list. Both clearly predate the concert. One copy is on the florescent stock. This means that posters on the florescent stock (BG-45-OP-1) predate the concerts and are originals printed before the event. The other copy is on the non-florescent stock. This means that posters on the non-florescent stock (BG-45-OP-2) predate the concerts and are originals printed before the event.
Furthermore I have blank backed handbills on both stocks. Blank backed handbills were only printed before the concerts. This is further confirmation that posters on both stocks predated the concerts and are original printings.


Under BG-48 change BG-48-OP-2 to read, "This poster has dot screen lettering and no green      imprint."

Under BG-48 notes add:
By May 2006 there were only two remaining differences between this Guide and the Bill Graham Presents printing history  according to the archivist of www.wolfgangsvault.com. BG-48 was one of these two. I went to the vault and presented my evidence regarding BG-48 to their archivist, and after we examined both posters in their archive and items I brought with me, he agreed to change their listings to conform with mine. Since this is a significant change for them, I believe the readers of this Guide are entitled to know what that evidence is.
All known copies of BG-48 were printed on a sheet with three small versions of the image ar-
ranged vertically alongside the poster. For this reason copies of cards exist which match all the
variations of the poster. Two different paper stocks were used to print BG-48 posters. One is an
index which is about .0080” to .0085” thick. This is different from the index used on Bill Gra-
ham originals from BG-54 to BG-149 which is .0090” thick or thicker. The other is a vellum
which is .0090” thick and similar to the vellum used on numerous Bill Graham Presents posters prior to this one and which was used on BG-49, BG-50, BG-51, BG-52 and BG-53 but never again after that.
It has long been agreed that BG-48-OP-4 is an original. I am in possession of two different
BG-48 cards which were addressed on an addressograph machine and sent to people on the mailing list which match BG-48-OP-4 both in configuration and in paper stock which was the index stock. This means that BG-48-OP-4 posters existed prior to the event because they match cards which existed prior to the event because mailers only were printed prior to the event. Since all that BG-48-OP-2 is is BG-48-OP-4 without the green impression, BG-48-OP-2 also long has been agreed to be an original.
The differences arose concerning BG-48-OP-1 and BG-48-OP-3, the ones on the vellum stock. All that BG-48-OP-3 is is BG-48-OP-1 with an additional green impression which was done last. As I stated above, this vellum stock was only used on the next five poster and then not used again. Between BG-53 and BG-54 Bill Graham Presents changed printers, and the new printer was much more consistent in the choice of paper stock than previously had been the case. From BG-54 to BG-149 the same uncoated index was used. All reprints done in the period between BG-54 and BG-149 were also done on this uncoated index. For example, BG-24, BG-38, BG-45 etc. were all reprinted on this stock. What this means is that if BG-48-OP-1 and BG-48-OP-3 were reprints, they would have had to have been reprinted within the five weeks following the concert but before BG-54. Since the only reason for reprinting was for resale, the only time posters were reprinted was when the inventory of a poster ran low. Since the original press run of BG-48 was 3,500, many of which were not distributed to promote the concerts but were held back for later resale, it is hard to imagine these sold so quickly that the inventory ran out in five weeks necessitating reprinting after so short a time.
Adding to the argument that BG-48-OP-1 and BG-48-OP-3 are originals is the fact that the card which matched BG-48-OP-1 is blank backed. All known reprint cards have some form of Bill Graham Presents backprint. In all previous cases blank backed handbills only were printed prior to the event for distribution to promote the concerts. Since BG-48-OP-1 and BG-48-OP-3 were printed together, then if BG-48-OP-1 is an original, then BG-48-OP-3 is an original.
Still another argument adding to the conclusion that BG-48-OP-1 and BG-48-OP-3 are originals is the fact that they involve substantial experimentation with color and dot screen. It is agreed by all the experts that the printers never experimented with color or design. They simply printed what they were told to print by the artist. Only the artists experimented in these ways. Wes Wilson, the artist who created this design, states specifically that he never oversaw the printing of reprints. He only oversaw the printing of originals, ones printed before the event. Since the printers did not experiment and this poster involved major experimentation and Wes Wilson did not oversee printing of reprints, BG-48-OP-1 and BG-48-OP-3 can not be reprints.
I believe that taken together this evidence is conclusive that all BG-48 posters are original printings, ones printed before the event with the intention of distribution to promote the concerts.

Under BG-49 add "Jimmy Reed" to acts

Under BG-49 change cards to read

After BG-51-RP-2 add
BG-51-RP-3      In 2006 the new owner of the Bill Graham Presents copyrights, Wolfgang’s
    Vault, reprinted six of the numbered Fillmore/Fillmore West posters. Each was
    printed in two different sizes on two different stocks. All bear the credit
    “Wolfgang’s Vault” in the lower right corner. This item is the smaller version on uncoated index. 13 43/64” x 22 25/64”
BG-51-RP-4      This item is the larger version on glossy, coated stock.  19 3/4” x 32 1/2”

After BG-51-RP-4 add:

BG-51-PP-5     In 2011 a pirate selling through www.amazon.com bootlegged this poster. It is on slick, glossy stock with a white border. The size is a distinguishing characteristic.
                         12" x 18 1/64"

After BG-51&52-OHB-D add:

BG-51-PC-E This card is identical to BG-51-PC-A except it is missing the letters "TIC" of the word "TICKETS" at the left of the ticket outlets strip.

Add to BG-51&52-OHB-B "The hat of the figure to the viewer's right in BG-52 is dark red."

After BG-51-PC-E add:

Add to BG-52-PC-A: Under BG-53 change acts to read:

                    "Otis Rush & his Chicago Blues Band

                    The Mothers

                    Morning Glory"

Under BG-53 change the dates to read 3/3-5/67.

Under BG-53-PC-B and BG-53-PC-E change “blue” to “blue/green” and “red” to “red/rust.”

Eliminate the current section under BG-53-PC-G and change it to read:

Under BG-54 add "Jimmy Reed" to acts.

Add to BG-54-PC-A "The chin of the lower face is the same color as the rest of the face."

Add to BG-54-PC-B "The chin of the lower face is the same color as the rest of the face."

After BG-54-PC-C add:

Add to BG-54-OP-1 "The chin of the lower face is the same color as the rest of the face."

Delete the acts listed and replace with:

                    "Chambers Brothers

                    Quicksilver Messenger Service

                    Sandy Bull"

Under BG-56 change BG-56-PC-I to read: “In 2002 Jim Northrup showed me a copy of BG-56-PC-F which had been mechanically addressed and sent to someone on the mailing list.”

Change BG-57-OP-1 to read:

After BG-57-RP-2 add
BG-57-RP-3   In 2013 the current copyright holder, Wolfgang's Vault, reprinted this poster with a Wolfgang's Vault credit in the lower right corner. 22 3/8" x 36"

Under BG-58 change the date to read "4/7-9/67."


Change the entire text of BG-61 to read:
BG-61-OP-1    One original printing of this poster is chartreuse. In 2009 it was learned that during the printing of this poster some copies were printed on one side of the paper stock, and some copies were printed on the other side of the same paper stock. This stock had one “smooth” or “random” textured side and one “rows” or “woven” textured side. This variant was printed on the “smooth” side so the back has a “rows” texture.  (See notes at the end of this poster.)
    14 1/32” x 21 29/64”      
BG-61-OP-2    In 1998 it was learned that there were not two separate early printings of this poster, an original and a reprint, but that the color of the ink was changed during the run of a single printing. The evidence of this is that cards were discovered which were neither yellow nor chartreuse but a series of progressive steps between one and the other indicating a mixing of ink during one print run, something which occurred occasionally when the printer ran out of ink during the print run and substituted a similar but not identical ink for the remainder of the run. The silver color also varies from pure silver to silver with gold mixed in with it. All posters of this image except BG-61-RP-3 should be considered originals. This item is yellow. This variant has a “rows” texture on the back.
    13 61/64” x 21 13/32”
BG-61-PP-3    In 1990 Pyramid Books in England pirated this image.  The top inch with "Bill Graham Presents in San Francisco" is cut off.  Dimensions are
    c. 11 7/8" x 17 1/2".  Stock is high gloss coated. In 1997 it was learned that this was a properly licensed reprint, not a pirate. 11 55/64” x 16 33/64”
BG-61-OP-4      This variant is a chartreuse color. It has a “smooth” texture back.

After BG-61-OP-4 add:
BG-61-PP-5       In 2011 a pirate selling on www.amazon.com bootlegged this poster. It is on
    slick, glossy stock and has a white border not on the original. The distinguishing characteristic of this bootleg is size which is a lot smaller than genuine
    copies. 12” x 18 1/64”

BG-61-OPC-A    This is a chartreuse postcard with a place stamp here reverse. It is printed on the smooth side of the stock so it has a “rows” texture back. 4 33/64” x 8”
BG-61-OPC-B    This variant is a chartreuse postcard with a bulk rate permit reverse. It has a “rows” texture back. 4 33/64” x 8”
BG-61-OPC-C    Some copies of BG-61-OPC-B were mechanically addressed and sent to people on the mailing list.  
BG-61-OPC-D    This is a yellow postcard with a place stamp here reverse. See correction for BG-61-RP-2 (Now BG-61-OP-2). All cards of this image should be considered originals. This card has a “rows” texture back. 4 35/64” x 8”
BG-61-OPC-E   This is a yellow postcard with a bulk mail permit reverse.  This variant has a “rows” texture back. 4 1/2” x 8”
BG-61-OPC-F    Some copies of BG-61-OPC-E were mechanically addressed and sent to
    people on the mailing list.
BG-61-OPC-G  This chartreuse postcard with a place stamp here back is printed on the “rows” textured side of the same stock as the other variants so it has a “smooth” textured back. It matches BG-61-OP-4

B. G. 61
This poster is either yellow or chartreuse and silver or silver/gold on a black background.  Variations are due to the fact that the colors of the inks were changed during the press run. The central image is a fantasy face of a figure with a long headdress which forms part of the lettering.  In one way it is very unfortunate that Wes Wilson was about to have a dispute with Bill Graham which led to Wes no longer producing images for the Fillmore concerts because most of the designs he created at this time were some of the most brilliant works of graphic art created in this century, the mature work of a genius.
In 2009 someone pointed out to me that some copies of BG-61 posters were on stock which had “rows” or “woven” texture backs and some copies were on stock which had “smooth” or “random” texture backs. This person asked me whether I thought that one was an original and one was a reprint or both were originals only different variants.

    The first thing I did was check whether there were postcards which matched both of these varieties. There were. I noticed that both kinds had a back print credit stating that the printing had been done by Creative Litho Co. of Oakland. Creative Litho Co. only printed originals from BG-58 to BG-65. BG-57 original was printed by West Coast Litho, and Tea Lautrec Litho took over printing for Bill Graham Presents with concert number 66. I also note that BG-59 was printed by the artist who created it, Peter Bailey, at East Wind Printers. It also should be noted that the color of both versions of this poster varies substantially along a gradual spectrum from pure yellow to bright chartreuse.

    By means of identifying several very tiny print flaws which are present in varying degrees on numerous copies of both varieties, I was able to establish that both varieties, “rows” back and “smooth” back, were printed with the same printing plates. This was confirmed by very precise measurements done across the images. Of course, this does not prove that one group was not printed after the concert, but if it could have been shown that different printing plates had been used, that would have been good evidence for two printings, very probably one before the concerts and one after.

    Since we know that the posters and postcards in this period were printed on one sheet with three cards vertically alongside one poster, the next step was to examine several postcards which had been back printed with the Bill Graham Presents bulk mail permit, addressed with his addressograph machine and sent to people on the mailing list. If copies of both “rows” back and “smooth” back could be found, that would prove that both versions existed before the concerts and were originals. Unfortunately there only were “rows” back mailers in the small group of mailers I was able to locate. This does not prove that “smooth” back did not predate the concert, only that it did not appear in this small group of mailers.

    I then went to Wolfgangs Vault where the owner allows me to do research using the Vault’s extensive collection and inventory. Also, there I have the benefit of collaborating with Grant Feichtmeier who has become very knowedgeable about this material. One of the possibilities I wanted to check there was did any of the “smooth” back posters have a “rows” texture front, that is, was it possible that the “smooth” back cards and posters simply were sheets of the same stock fed into the press with the “rows” side up instead of down. Were they printed on the other side of the same stock. Although it is a bit more difficult to identify “rows” texture that has been covered completely with ink (There are no areas of unprinted white on this poster.) than it is to identify on an unprinted back, Grant and I were able to discern that numerous copies of “smooth” back BG-61 posters and cards had a “rows” texture on the front.

            It should be noted here that not all stock with a “rows” or “woven” texture is the same. For example, different stocks with “rows” or “woven” texture on one side will glow or floresce differently or not at all under black light. I examined originals of BG-60 and BG-62, and both were printed on stock with “rows” back, but both looked different from each other and from BG-61 “rows” back under black light. The reasonable conclusion from this is that Creative Litho Co. did not maintain a large inventory of paper stocks but probably went to a paper dealer and bought paper for each job as it came in. This means that the situation at Creative Litho Co. was not like that at Tea Lautrec Litho where Levon Mosgofian bought a semi trailer load of one stock of paper for Bill Graham, stored it and used it for almost all originals from BG-150 to BG-287. This is in contrast to earlier printers who went to paper dealers for each job and often (See BG-38.) used several different stocks for one original printing of one poster.

    At this point I thought evidence leaned toward “rows” back and “smooth” back being variants of one pre concert printing, but I found the evidence was not dispositive. I had to come up with another way of letting the posters speak for themselves.
Then it occurred to me that paper that is not coated on either side (The paper on which BG-61 was printed is not coated on either side.) would floresce the same under black light on either side because no matter which side you were looking at, you would be looking at the same material. Under black light I looked at the backs of several copies of both “rows” back and “smooth” back BG-61 posters. All clearly floresced the same. Obviously this demonstrated that BG-61 “smooth” back simply is a variant of BG-61 printed on the same paper stock as BG-61 “rows” back only printed on the other side of the same paper stock. Finally I compared these under black light to the backs of several mailers which had been sent to people on the mailing list which I had examined earlier, and I found that they were on the same stock as the mailers. This proves that “smooth” back posters predate the concerts and are originals just as are “rows” back.

    One interesting thing I discovered while studying this poster is that under black light the silver ink floresces in a bright purple color which produces a very beautiful effect contrasting well with the chartreuse and black parts of the image. Since Wes Wilson again used silver ink for the reprint of next poster, BG-62, I think he deliberately used this silver ink which floresced purple under black light because he was aware of this beautiful effect.
 





Under BG-62-RP-3 add:
Some copies of this poster were folded in quarters and distributed in the Spring 1971 issue Vol. 3 No. 1 of New Haven Rock Press edited by Jon Tiven. The cost was 25 cents.

After BG-62-RP-3 add:
BG-62-RP-4   In 2014 Wolfgang's Vault reprinted the original version of this poster on slick, glossy stock in a press run of 500. A "Wolfgang's Vault" credit appears in the lower left corner.
                        20 13 /2" x 34 5/32"

Under BG-62-OPC-E and BG-62-OPC-F add “On some copies of this card the green is tinged with yellow.”

After BG-66-PC-C add:
Under BG-68-OP-1 add "legally" before "printed."

After BG-68-OP-1 add

BG-68-PP-2 The pirate printing represents a drastic alteration of the image. The Bill Graham credit at the top is eliminated and so is the ticket outlets strip at the bottom, but most notable is the change in colors. The original purple on an orange background which extends to the border is changed to a white border with black lines and color produced by a split fountain technique which has rust at the top and yellow at the bottom all on an aqua/blue background.
After BG-68-PP-2 add
BG-68-RP-3    In 2010 the current copyright holder of these Bill Graham posters, Wolfgang’s Vault, issued a large size reprint of this image on glossy, coated stock. It bears the notation
                        “Wolfgang’s Vault” in white in the lower right corner. 23 9/32” x 37”

Under BG-69 change date to "20-25."

Under BG-69-OP-1 add "legally" after "printed."

After BG-69-OP-1 add:
 

BG-69-PP-2 The pirate printing represents a drastic alteration of the image. The Bill Graham Presents credit is eliminated at the top and so is the ticket outlets strip and artist’s credit at the
bottom, but most notable is the change of colors. The original purple on an orange background which extends to the border is changed to a white border with black lines and color produced by a split fountain technique which has violet at the top, yellow in the middle and blue/green at the bottom. 14 3/4" x 22 1/64"
After BG-69-PP-2 add
BG-69-RP-3      In 2010 the current copyright holder of these Bill Graham posters, Wolfgang’s Vault, issued a large size reprint of this image on glossy, coated stock. The notation “Wolfgang’s
                          Vault” appears in white in the lower right corner. 23 5/16” x 37 1/32”

After BG-69-RP-3 add:
BG-69-PP-4    In 2011 a pirate selling on www.amazon.com bootlegged this poster. The stock
    used was slick and glossy. A white border not on the original was added. The
    size is the distinguishing characteristic. 12” x 17 63/64”


Under BG-74 under acts add "Luke and the Apostles (listed on program but not on poster or card)."

After BG-74-PP-3 add
BG-74-RP-4    In late 2006 the new owner of the Bill Graham Presents Copyrights,Wolfgang’s Vault, reprinted four more of the numbered Fillmore/FillmoreWest posters. Each was printed in two different sizes on two different stocks. All bear the credit “Wolfgang’s Vault” in the lower right corner. This item is the smaller version on uncoated index. 15 13/32” x 22 25/32”
BG-74-RP-5 This is the larger version on glossy, coated stock. 22 3/8” x 32 1/2”

 After BG-74-PPC-D add

Under BG-75 change BG-75-OP-1 to read
BG-75-OP-1 The original poster was printed on uncoated index. The printer’s credit "Neal, Stratford & Kerr" appears to the right of "75." 14 5/16" x 21 11/32"
Under BG-75 change BG-75-RP-2 to read
BG-75-RP-2 This reprint poster was printed on coated stock of the kind used for most Bill Graham originals beginning with number 150. The printer’s credit mentioned under BG-75-OP-1 is deleted. 13 61/64" x 21 5/32"
Under BG-75 add
BG-75-RP-3 An additional reprint exists which predates BG-75-RP-2. This item was printed on stock similar to the original, that used for Bill Graham originals from number 54 to number 149. The printer’s credit mentioned under BG-75-OP-1 is deleted.
14" x 21 19/64"
After BG-75-RP-3 add:
BG-75-RP-4      In 2006 the new owner of the Bill Graham Presents copyrights, Wolfgang’s
    Vault, reprinted six of the numbered Fillmore/Fillmore West posters. Each was
    printed in two different sizes on two different stocks. All bear the credit
    “Wolfgang’s Vault” in the lower right corner. This item is the smaller version on uncoated index. 14 15/64 x 21 45/64”
BG-75-RP-5      This item is the larger version on glossy, coated stock.  21 25/64” x 32 31/32”

After BG-75-RP-5 add:
BG-75-PP-6       In 2011 a pirate selling through www.amazon.com bootlegged this poster.
    Since this version lacks the “Neal, Stratford and Kerr” credit of BG-75-OP-1,
    it must have been taken from a reprint. The colors seem to indicate the version
    used was BG-75-RP-2. This pirate is on slick, glossy stock and has a white
    border not present on genuine copies. An unscrupulous person could cut off
    this border so it can not be used as a distinguishing characteristic. Since its size
    is quite different from genuine copies, that can be used to distinguish it.
    12” x 18 1/64”


After BG-75&76-OPC-C add
BG-75-RPC-D   In 2009 the Denver Art Museum used a postcard sized version of this image to promote a show of its new collection of psychedelic art. The edges were perforated. There is
                           information about their 2009 show on the back. The signature of the artist, Bonnie MacLean, appears above “Tickets.” 3 1/2” x 5 1/2” 


Under BG-76 change the text to read: At the bottom of the page add: After BG-79-OP-1 add
BG-79-RP-2   In 2013 the current copyright holder, Wolfgang's Vault, reprinted this poster with a Wolfgang's Vault credit in the lower right corner. 24" x 36"

Under BG-80 acts add "*Prime Movers."
"* A member of the Prime Movers told me that his band substituted for Electric Flag."


Under BG-81 change posters to read:
BG-81-OP-1    In 2007 I examined copies of this poster that had been in the archive assembled by Jacaeber Kastor formerly of Psychedelic Solution. Based on his access to printing records of  
                        Tea Lautrec Litho which were unknown to me, he listed two printings of this in his catalog. In his catalog he only listed them as different shades of green, but in his personal notes
                        he stated that the original was printed on stock which when viewed obliquely on the reverse had a distinct woven or “rows” pattern.  Neither of the two markings described under
                        BG-81-RP-2 appear on copies of  BG-81-OP-1 14 7/32” x 21 19/64” 
BG-81-RP-2     The reprint is on stock the reverse of which has no “rows” or woven pattern. An easier way to distinguish BG-81-OP-1 from BG-81-RP-2 than the presence or absence of
                         rows or woven texture stock on the back is to look for either or both of the following two markings which appear only on copies of BG-81-RP-2. First find the 1/4” wide
                         horizontal, medium green bar which separates “BOWL” from “SEPT 15 FRI.” Look 9/16” left of the left edge of this bar in the light blue area. In this exact spot on the reprint
                         there will be an irregularly shaped white spot about 1/16” x 1/32.” Second look in the extreme lower right corner of the poster. On the reprint there will be a vertical area about
                         1/16” wide running up the right edge of the poster which is made up of fine dot screen. This area diminishes in width as it goes up toward the top along the right edge and
                         disappears before it reaches the top. Since it is possible someone could trim off this area of dot screen and/or attempt to fill in the white spot with a colored marker or pencil, in
                         order to make a reprint appear to be an original,  if it is possible, one should use the presence or absence of the rows or woven pattern on the back of the stock as a
                         final check. 13 7/8” x 20 19/32”   

 

Under BG-82-OP-1 add:
In 2008 it was discovered that there was some variation in color on a small number of copies of this poster. The green was lighter and the orange more nearly brown on these variants. These were not part of a separate printing.

Under Bg-83-OP-1 add:
As with BG-82-OP-1 there are a small number of copies with slightly different colors'

Under BG-86 change posters to read:

BG-86-OP-1A     The original is on uncoated index similar to most Bill Graham originals from number 54 to number 149.  In 2002 Jacaeber Kastor noticed that there were two variations, and in 2006 I noticed a third, two of which are originals. One is a reprint. Apparently during the original press run the printer noticed two small flaws in the plate after some posters had been printed, stopped the presses and corrected them. The first version has the two small flaws. These flaws are a small yellow dot between the upper arms of the “E” in “ONE” and a small yellow area along the top edge of the bottom curve of the “S” in “SEPT.” 14 1/32” x 21 7/64”

BG-86-OP-1B    In 2007 I discovered that this poster had been printed three times, not twice as previously had been thought. The poster formerly identified as BG-86-OP-1B was found to be a reprint. Accordingly this designation is being eliminated from this Guide. See reasoning under notes.

BG-86-OP-1C    On this version the yellow dot between the upper legs of the “E” in “ONE” has been “corrected” with small brown dots which mimic the dot screen of the background. The yellow area along the top edge of the “S” in SEPT.” has been scratched on the plate so this flaw also is no longer present.  14 3/64” x 21 1/8”

BG-86-RP-1.5   In 2007 the poster formerly identified as BG-86-OP-1B was discovered to be a reprint. It is an earlier reprint than BG-86-RP-2. This reprint is on index. It can be distinguished from BG-86-OP-1A and BG-86-OP-1C because the yellow area along the top edge of the “S” in “SEPT” has been corrected, but the small yellow dot between the upper arms of the “E” in “ONE” has not been corrected. That area is still yellow on this version. 14 1/64 ‘ x 21 35/64”

 BG-86-RP-2 The third printing, a reprint, is on the glossy, coated stock used for most Bill Graham originals beginning with number 150.  It is interesting that this reprint follows the earliest version of the poster, BG-86-OP-1A. 14 1/64” x 21 9/32”

 



Under BG-86-PC-A change "blank" to "place stamp here."

Under BG-86 notes add:

In 2007 I first got access to printing records of Bill Graham Presents for posters printed by Tea Lautrec Litho. These records indicated that BG-86 had been printed three times instead of two as previously had been thought. The records indicated that one of the reprints was done in August of 1968, well before the shift to glossy stock, so one reprint had to be on index stock. The first thought that this reprint was one of the already known three variants on index proved true.

I studied all three index versions to see if there was some way that one of them could be separated from the other two. First I noted that two of them were virtually identical in size, only 1/64” different from each other while the third was substantially different in length. While it is not impossible for random chance to have the printer set the cutter identically on two separate occasions, this is not likely so I began to see if there were other links between the two similarly

sized versions, BG-86-OP-1A and BG-86-OP-1C. I found that there is a small white dot in the top center of the “O” in “COW” on each of these but not in the same location on the newly designated BG-86-RP-1.5. This white dot on both OP-1A and OP-1C only would have been possible if they were printed at the same time. I was able to examine the original film which was used to produce the printing plates for all the printings. This film would produce a plate that printed  a poster fitting the characteristics of BG-86-OP-1A. This leads to the idea that this is the original state of the poster. If this is the original state of the poster, then BG-86-OP-1C which was printed at the same time as BG-86-OP-1A also precedes the concert. This leaves only BG-86-RP-1.5 to be the August reprint on index. Postcards also have the flaws in the “E” in “ONE” and the “S” in “SEPT.” I was not able to link any of the paper stocks to any of the others using blacklight on the backs.

 



Under BG-87 change cards to read:

 
BG-87-PC-A All small size are on the same stock as BG-87-OP-1. This postcard has a place stamp here reverse. On this variant the face and the body of the Mercury figure are the same color. 4 35/64" x 6 29/32"

BG-87 & 88-PC-B This double postcard has a blank reverse on the BG-87 side and a bulk mail permit on the reverse of the BG-88 side. The face of the Mercury figure is the same color as the body. 4 35/64" x 13 63/64"

BG-87 & 88-PC-C Some copies of BG-87 & 88-PC-B were mechanically addressed and sent to people on the mailing list.

BG-87-PC-D This postcard has a place stamp here reverse. The face of the Mercury figure is even throughout and lighter in color than the body.

BG-87-PC-E This postcard has a place stamp here reverse. The upper portion of the face of the Mercury figure matches the body, but the lower portion of the face is lighter than the body.

BG-87 & 88-OPC-F This double postcard has a blank reverse on the BG-87 side and a bulk mail permit on the BG-88 side. The face of the Mercury figure on the BG-87 side is even throughout and lighter in color than the body.

BG-87 & 88-PC-G Some copies of BG-87 & 88-PC-F were mechanically addresses and sent to people on the mailing list.

BG-87 & 88 PC-H This double postcard has a blank reverse on the BG-87 side and a bulk mail permit on the BG-88 side. The upper portion of the face of the Mercury figure on the BG-87 side matches the body, but the lower portion of the face is lighter than the body.

BG-87 & 88-PC-I Some copies of BG-87 & 88-PC-H were mechanically addresses and sent to people on the mailing list.


Under BG-89 after BG-89-OP-1 add:
BG-89-OP-2      In 2006 several copies of an original variant of this image were discovered.
    These are characterized by skin and lettering which are olive green in color.
    On this version the woman’s eye is the same green color as her face. 14” x 21”
BG-89-OP-3      This version is similar to BG-89-OP-2 except the woman’s eye is not olive green but pink. 14” x  21”

After BG-90-OP-1 add
BG-90-PP-2       In 2006 a pirate printer offered a bootleg of this image on ebay. It is distinguished by the absence of a ticket outlets strip. 18 29/32” x 24 1/64”

After BG-90-PP-2 add
                         BG-90-RP-3      In 2010 the current copyright holder of these Bill Graham Presents posters, Wolfgang’s Vault, issued a large size reprint of this image on glossy, coated stock.
                                                   The notation “Wolfgang’s Vault” appears in white  in the lower right corner. 24 61/64” x 37 1/32”

 
Under Tickets under BG-90 add

      "A variant ticket without a bottom strip exists. Red, yellow, dk & lt tan"

Under BG-92-OP-1 Change the length to 21 3/64"
After BG-92-OP-1 add
BG-92-RP-2   In 2013 the current copyright holder, Wolfgang's Vault, reprinted this poster with a Wolfgang's Vault credit in the lower right corner. 24 13/ 64" x 36"

Under BG-98 Artist add "Stanley Mouse."

After the main heading designations "BG-97" and "BG-98" place asterisks. At the bottom of the page add the following:

The designation "BG-97-RP-2 should be changed to "BG-97-OP-2."

After BG-97-OP-2 add
BG-97-OP-3   In 2013 a new variant was discovered. This variant does not have any of the credits listed for BG-97-OP-1 or BG-97-OP-2. This variant was printed at the end of the press run, not
                        the beginning. The following not should be added to B.G. 97 Notes:
In 2013 a new variant of BG-97 and a new variant of BG-98 were discovered. These are not reprints.
They are part of the original press run. They just were done in very small quantities so that they were not widely noticed before now. They were printed on the correct original paper stocks, printed with the correct original inks, and printed with the correct original printing plates.

The distinguishing characteristic of these two newly discovered variants is that they are missing credit "c B. GRAH(A)M 67" with or without the second "A," missing the "#97" on the BG-97, and missing the "KELLY" on the BG-98.

At first it appeared that these must have come from the beginning of the press run before the extra credits were scratched into the plate, but careful examination indicates that these were the result of the credits being removed, not the result of the plate being run without the credits added.

On the BG-97 which is now designated BG-97-OP-3 a very close examination of the area where the credit should appear reveals the remnants of the "C" in the circle immediately above the "L" in "LIGHTS" and the bottom portion of the "6" in "67" just above the "B" in "BY."The area where the "#97" appeared also shows signs of alteration. There also is a printing zit (A small spot on the poster where there was a speck of dirt on the printing plate which made a characteristic mark on the paper.) on the copy  I saw of BG-97-OP-3 which exactly matches a printing zit on a copy of BG-97-OP-2 indicating that they were printed relatively close in time during the printing sequence because printers often stopped the presses to clean these specks off the plates. I also saw another copy of BG-97-OP-2 which did not have this printing zit, so clearly this speck was not on the plate throughout this part of the press run.

On the BG-98 which is now designated BG-98-OP-4 there are no remnants of the credits, but the trimming matches copies of BG-98-OP-3 which are trimmed differently than copies of BG-98-OP-1 and BG-98-OP-2 which are trimmed identically. This would not be the case if this new variant had come at the beginning of the press run, not the end. Also it would be logical that if the presses were stopped to remove the credits from BG-97 near the end of the press run, that the credits on BG-98 would have been removed at the same time.

The text of BG-98 should be discarded and replaced with:

After BG-98-OP-3 add:
BG-98-OP-4  In 2013 a new variant of this image was discovered. It does not have any of the credits listed under BG-98-OP-1, 2, or 3. It was printed at the end of the press run, not the beginning. The following explanation also appears under Notes B.G. 97
In 2013 a new variant of BG-97 and a new variant of BG-98 were discovered. These are not reprints.
They are part of the original press run. They just were done in very small quantities so that they were not widely noticed before now. They were printed on the correct original paper stocks, printed with the correct original inks, and printed with the correct original printing plates.

The distinguishing characteristic of these two newly discovered variants is that they are missing credit "c B. GRAH(A)M 67" with or without the second "A," missing the "#97" on the BG-97, and missing the "KELLY" on the BG-98.

At first it appeared that these must have come from the beginning of the press run before the extra credits were scratched into the plate, but careful examination indicates that these were the result of the credits being removed, not the result of the plate being run without the credits added.

On the BG-97 which is now designated BG-97-OP-3 a very close examination of the area where the credit should appear reveals the remnants of the "C" in the circle immediately above the "L" in "LIGHTS" and the bottom portion of the "6" in "67" just above the "B" in "BY."The area where the "#97" appeared also shows signs of alteration. There also is a printing zit (A small spot on the poster where there was a speck of dirt on the printing plate which made a characteristic mark on the paper.) on the copy  I saw of BG-97-OP-3 which exactly matches a printing zit on a copy of BG-97-OP-2 indicating that they were printed relatively close in time during the printing sequence because printers often stopped the presses to clean these specks off the plates. I also saw another copy of BG-97-OP-2 which did not have this printing zit, so clearly this speck was not on the plate throughout this part of the press run.

On the BG-98 which is now designated BG-98-OP-4 there are no remnants of the credits, but the trimming matches copies of BG-98-OP-3 which are trimmed differently than copies of BG-98-OP-1 and BG-98-OP-2 which are trimmed identically. This would not be the case if this new variant had come at the beginning of the press run, not the end. Also it would be logical that if the presses were stopped to remove the credits from BG-97 near the end of the press run, that the credits on BG-98 would have been removed at the same time.

Under BG-97-PC-A add "This card is 4 3/8" wide."

Under BG-97&98-PC-B add "This card is 4 18" wide."

Under BG-97 the final (second) designation "BG-97&98-PC-B" should read "BG-97&98-PC-C."
Change the second BG-97&98-PC-B to BG-97&98-PC-C.

After BG-97&98-PC-C add

BG-97-PC-D This postcard sized item is identical to BG-97-PC-A except the reverse is blank. 4 23/64" x 7 3/64"

After BG-99-RP-2 add
                            BG-99-RP-3      In 2010 the current copyright holder of these Bill Graham Presents posters, Wolfgang’s Vault, issued a large size reprint of this image on glossy, coated stock.
                                                      The notation “Wolfgang’s Vault” appears in white  in the lower right corner. 24 37/64” x 37 1/32”

After BG-99-RP-3 add:
BG-99-PP-4       In 2011 a pirate selling on www.amazon.com bootlegged this poster. The blue background is mottled. The stock is slick, glossy, and there is a white border not on the original.
                           The size is the distinguishing characteristic. 12” x 18 1/64”



Under BG-99&100-PC-D change "end to end" to "side to side."

After BG-99&100-OPC-D add:
BG-99-RPC-E    In 2006 the new owner of the Bill Graham copyrights, Wolfgangsvault, used this image on a large postcard which was sent to people on their
                            mailing list as a seasonal holiday card and as card advertising a discount on merchandise. 5 1/4” x 9 7/32”

Under BG-100 change posters to read:
BG-100-OP-1    In 2007 Phil Cushway, the owner of Artrock, posted on expressobeans.com printing  dockets and printing samples which prove that this poster was printed twice. The
      original printing does not have the green dot described under BG-100-RP-2.  14” x 21 1/32”
BG-100-RP-2    The reprint discovered in 2007 is distinguished by a small green dot which is located in the lower portion of the “v” in “Quicksilver.”
BG-100-RP-3    In 2010 the current copyright holder of these Bill Graham posters, Wolfgang’s Vault, issued a large size reprint of this image on glossy, coated stock.. This reprint bears the
                          notation “Wolfgang’s Vault” in white in the lower left corner. 24 43/64” x 37 1/64”

After BG-100-RP-3 add:
BG-100-PP-4    In 2011 a pirate selling on www.amazon.com bootlegged this poster. The stock
    used was slick and glossy. A white border not on the original was added. The
    size is the distinguishing characteristic. 12” x 18 1/64”
 

Under BG-101 Change acts to read:

After BG-101-RP-2 add:
BG-101-PP-3    In 2011 a pirate selling on www.amazon.com bootlegged this poster. The stock used was slick and glossy. A white border not on the original was added. The copy from which the
                          bootleg was made had staple pairs in each corner, and these “staple pairs” appear on the bootleg. The size is the distinguishing characteristic. 12” 18 1/32”


Under BG-102-RP-2 add: "The ticket outlets strip was deleted from this printing."

Under BG-103 change posters to read:
BG-103-OP-1  In 2007 Phil Cushway of Artrock posted on expressobeans.com a printing docket and printing sample from Tea Lautrec Litho which proved this poster was printed twice. The original does not have the white dot described under the reprint. The reprint docket was dated December 1968. 14 3/16" x 21 1/16"
BG-103-RP-2  The reprint of this poster has a 1/16" white circle located 2 3/4" in from the right edge level with the "t" in "Litho." This circle is much more readily seen as a gray circle under black light. For my response to Mr. Cushway see the notes below which will explain the process by which this distinction was reached.
13 57/64" x 20 63/64"
Under BG-103 notes add:
hi phil et. al.,
many of you were concerned when phil posted clear and incontrovertible evidence that bg-103 had been reprinted but did not include with his post any reliable means of telling the reprint from the original. it was apparent from the scans with the post that the reprint was a darker green than the original, but as jim northrup has pointed out, posters fade over time, inks get lighter and darker during press runs, and human eyes see color differently. in order to be able to answer the challenge given us by jacaeber kastor, that we find some mark or characteristic which will enable a person with only one item to figure out what he has, we have to use some other description than ,"the original is lighter than the reprint."
this afternoon (10/24/07) i spent several hours with grant of wolfgangsvault (thanks for your help, grant and bill.) going through the vault inventory of, among other things, bg-103. we found there were two distinctly different groups of bg-103 in their inventory. one was the lighter green, the other the darker. there were no gradual transition copies between them. we then looked for a mark on one which was not on the other, and we found one. on the reprint if you go to the letter "t" in "litho" along the right edge and measure 2 3/4" perpendicular to the edge at that point, you will find a 1/16" faint white circle which looks like a transitory printing hickey, but this white circle appears on all copies of the darker green group, and it appears on none of the ones in the lighter green group. we know that the lighter green is the original because phil stated in his first post in this string that the folded, darker copy came from the envelope which said it was the reprint.
since this small white circle is very hard to make out in most light, i tried shining a black light on it, and i found that in that way it was much more sharply defined as a gray circle. for this reason i suggest that collectors wanting to distinguish these two printings shine black light on this area. the circle, if it is there, will be very distinct.
for those of you who are trying to maintain a complete set of all printings, wolfgangsvault has copies of this reprint available for sale (i bought one.), and if you ask grant for this specific version, he will pull the reprint for you.
therose7

Under BG-104 change posters to read:

BG-104-OP-1        In 2007 I saw printing records belonging to Phil Cushway, owner of Artrock   which documented that this poster had been printed twice. The original does not have the mark described under the reprint. 14 15/64” x 21 3/64”

BG-104-RP-2   The reprint has a vertical faint pink bar on the back of the poster. This bar is 1/4” wide and extends from the top of the back of the poster down about 12.” It is just to the right of the middle of the poster. 14 3/16” x 21 1/64”

The reason that I am confident that the reprint and the original can be separated as described above is that I separated over a hundred copies of this poster using a black light shined on the backs. One group was one stock which had a mild glow or floresence under black light. The other was on stock which did not. None of the cards glowed or floresced under black light. I then looked for a mark on either one group or the other which could be used to distinguish them, and I discovered the faint pink bar described above which appears only on the backs of the group the floresced or glowed under black light.

 



Under BG-105 change the date from "88" to "68".

AfterBG-105-RP-5 add:
BG-105-RP-6      In 2006 the new owner of the Bill Graham Presents copyrights, Wolfgang’s
    Vault, reprinted six of the numbered Fillmore/Fillmore West posters. Each was
    printed in two different sizes on two different stocks. All bear the credit
    “Wolfgang’s Vault” in the lower right corner. This item is the smaller version on uncoated index. 13 1/2” x 21 3/32”
BG-105-RP-7      This item is the larger version on glossy, coated stock.  21” x 32 1/2”

After BG-105-RP-7 add:
BG-105-RP-8   In 2014 Wolfgang's Vault again reprinted this poster on slick, glossy stock in a press run of 1000. A "Wolfgang's Vault 2014" credit appears in the lower right corner.
                         21 1/64" x 32 33/64"

After BG-105-PC-E add

BG-105-RPC-F In 2001 Artrock used this image as the basis of a postcard which was used to announce a memorial exhibition on the tenth anniversary of Rick’s untimely death. 4 7/32" x 5 15/16"


Under BG-105 add:
BG-105-RPC-G In 2004 the new copyright holder who recently had purchased all the Bill Graham Presents copyrights began reprinting selected items. Among the first items printed at this time was a postcard of this image. A Wolfgangs Vault logo appears on the reverse.
    4 1/4” x 6”

Under BG-106 change artist from "Lee Conklin" to "Stanley Mouse."

Under BG-108 add "Who" to acts.

After BG-108-RP-2 add:
BG-108-RP-3  In 2014 Wolfgang's Vault reprinted this poster on slick, glossy stock in a press run of 500. A "Wolfgangs's Vault" credit appears in the lower right corner. 20 13/32" x 29 27/32"

Under BG-108 after BG-108-PC-A add

BG-108-RPC-B In 2000 SFX, the new owners of Bill Graham Presents reprinted this card using the reverse to advertise their sale of concert memorabilia. 3 15/16" x 5 15/16"
Under BG-109 change the number location to read, "109 appears above the 'e' in 'Loading Zone'"

After BG-109-RP-2 add
BG-109-RP-3    In 2006 the new owner of the Bill Graham Presents copyrights, Wolfgang’s
    Vault, reprinted six of the numbered Fillmore/Fillmore West posters. Each was
    printed in two different sizes on two different stocks. All bear the credit
    “Wolfgang’s Vault” in the lower right corner. This item is the smaller version on uncoated index. 13 57/64” x 20 31/32”
BG-109-RP-4      This item is the larger version on glossy, coated stock.  21 7/16” x 32 29/64”


Under BG-110-OP-1 add "It should be noted that color is not a reliable distinguishing factor between printings of BG-110. Although most originals are dark, nearly black and most reprints are medium brown, there are medium brown originals."

After BG-123-OP-1 add:
BG-123-PP-2    In 2011 a pirate selling through www.amazon.com bootlegged this poster. The
    stock used was slick and glossy. A white border not on the original was added.
    The distinguishing characteristic is its smaller size. 12” x 18”



Add to BG-124-PP-2:

After BG-132-OP-1 add:
BG-132-PP-2     In 2011 a pirate selling through www.amazon.com bootlegged this poster. The
    stock used was slick and glossy. A white border not on the original was added.
    Size is the distinguishing characteristic.  12” x 17 63/64” 


After BG-134-RP-2 add:
                           BG-134-PP-3     In 2110 a pirate printing based on BG-134-RP-2 was discovered in Europe. It has the “W” marking but is not on glossy stock and was not printed with the
                                                      BG-134-RP-2 printing plate. The best way to distinguish this pirate is that it is on uncoated index, not glossy, coated stock the way the legitimate reprint is. It
                                                      can be distinguished from the original by the presence of the “W.” 13 61/64” x 21 1/16”

After BG-134-PP-3 add:
BG-134-PP-4    In 2011 a pirate selling on www.amazon.com bootlegged this poster. The stock
    used was slick and glossy. A white border not on the original was added. The size is the distinguishing characteristic. 12” x 18”


After BG-135-OP-1 add:
BG-135-PP-2     In 2011 a pirate selling on www.amazon.com bootlegged this poster. The stock
    used was slick and glossy. A white border not on the original was added. The
    size is the distinguishing characteristic. 12 1/64” x 18 1/64”


After BG-136-OP-1 add:
BG-136-PP-2     In 2006 a pirate printer offered a bootleg of this image on a now discontinued
website. The image area was much larger than the original.
                           18 29/32” x 24”
After BG-136-PP-2 add:
BG-136-RP-3    In 2008 the new owner of the Bill Graham  Presents copyrights,  Wolfgang's  Vault,  reprinted four  numbered Fillmore  posters.  All  bear the credit
                          "Wolfgang's Vault" in the lower right corner. 20 27/64" x 32 9/32"


After BG-136-RP-3 add:
BG-136-PP-4     In 2011 a pirate selling on www.amazon.com bootlegged this poster. The stock
    used was slick and glossy. There is a white border not on the original. The
    distinguishing characteristic is size which is much smaller than the genuine
    copies. 12” x 18”

 Under BG-137 comments change "Rire" to "Rit."

Under BG-138 change BG-138-PC-A to read "This postcard has a place stamp here back."

Under BG-139 change number location to read "’138’ appears incorrectly above and right of ‘Hayward’ in the ticket outlets strip on the postcard. The previous image is the correct BG-138. This image is BG-139.

The correct number appears in this location on the poster.

Add to BG-140-PP-3:


Under BG-140-RP-3 (Since this is a properly licensed reprint, the designation is changed from PP-3 to RP-3) delete "Dimensions are 11 7/8" x 17 1/2"."  Correct dimensions are
                                   11 7/8" x 16 35/64"


Between BG-140-PP-3 and BG-140-PC-A add: Under BG-140 add:
BG-140-PP-6     In 2004 several earlier pirates were pointed out to me. This and one of BG-140
    appear to have been done by the same printer. The are both on the same thick
    (.0110”) coarse and porous stock. The inking was done poorly, and the ink tends to rub off the paper. From the look and condition of the paper it appears
    that this pirate was done at least ten and probably more years ago, (before 1994). Colors are very dull compared to the bright colors of the originals.
    17 29/32” x 11 61/64”

 After BG-140-PP-6 add
BG-140-RP-7    In 2010 the current copyright holder of these Bill Graham posters, Wolfgang’s Vault, issued a large size reprint of this image on glossy, coated stock. The notation “Wolfgang’s
                          Vault” appears in white in the lower right corner. 24 13/64” x 37”



Under BG-140A delete, "but since it does not… informational purposes only."

After BG-142-OP-1 add:
BG-142-PP-2    In 2011 a pirate selling on www.amazon.com bootlegged this poster. The stock
    used was slick and glossy. A white border not on the original was added. The
    size is the distinguishing characteristic. 12” x 17 63/64”

After BG-143 add:
BG-144A
                11/6-8/68            Winterland
                Unknown            Led Zeppelin
                                            Bonzo Dog Band
                                            Roland Kirk
BG-144A-PP-1     In 2008 a pirate printer apparently in Indiana created a poster similar to the old boxing style posters for a fantasy concert which did not occur at the time and place    
                              listed. It was printed on cardboard as were the old boxing style posters. This poster is an infringement on the rights of both the late Bill Graham as well as the acts
                              listed. It was sold on ebay among other places. 14 1/32" x 21 63/64"
B.G. 144A  This poster was printed by split fountain technique and is pink at the top, yellow in the middle and green at the bottom. The central image is a photograph of Led Zeppelin.
                    The lettering is block lettering.

Under BG-147 artist add "Victor Moscoso**."

After "*" add:

After BG-152-OP-1 add"
BG-152-RP-2   In 2008 the new owner of the Bill Graham  Presents copyrights,  Wolfgang's  Vault,  reprinted four  numbered Fillmore  posters.  All  bear the credit
                          "Wolfgang's Vault" in the lower right corner. 20 13/32" x 30 63/64"


Under BG-155-OP-1 change length from 21 7/32" to 21 17/32"
After BG-155-OP-1 add:
BG-155-RP-2    In 2010 the current copyright holder of  these Bill Graham posters, Wolfgang’s Vault, issued a large size reprint of this image on glossy, coated stock.. The notation “Wolfgang’s
                          Vault” appears in white in the lower right corner. 23 59/64” x 37 1/64”


Under BG-160 delete BG-160-PC-E.

Under BG-161 add BG-161-PC-D using text from BG-160-PC-E changing BG-160 bulk reverse to BG-161 bulk reverse.

Under BG-165-RP-2 add

 In 2001 Phil Cushway of Artrock listed a copy of this second printing on ebay describing it as a first (Item #1491643893). I questioned Mr. Cushway about this, and he said this was an accident. He said he had spoken with the artist, Randy Tuten, and he said Randy Tuten had told him specifically that the yellow bordered BG-165 is a reprint, and he, Mr. Cushway, does not dispute this.

Under BG-169 change the location to "Winterland."
After BG-169-RP-2 add

BG-169-RP-3     In late 2006 the new owner of the Bill Graham Presents copyrights,Wolfgang’s Vault, reprinted four of the numbered Fillmore/Fillmore West
posters.
  Each was printed on two different stocks. All bear the credit “Wolfgang’s Vault” in the lower right corner. This item is the smaller version
 on uncoated index. 14 25/32" x 22 13/32"

BG-169-RP-4    This item is the larger version on glossy, coated stock. 21 1/2" x 32 33/64"


Under BG-170 add
BG-170-RP-3    In 2006 the new owner of the Bill Graham Presents copyrights, Wolfgang’s
    Vault, reprinted six of the numbered Fillmore/Fillmore West posters. Each was
    printed in two different sizes on two different stocks. All bear the credit
    “Wolfgang’s Vault” in the lower right corner. This item is the smaller version on uncoated index. 14 1/64” x 21 1/32”
BG-170-RP-4      This item is the larger version on glossy, coated stock.  21 33/64” x 32 1/2”

at the end of BG-170 add:
* In 2006 a seller on ebay began marketing a boxing style poster for this event. No such poster existed at the time of these concerts. It was printed in split fountain process, reddish pink at the top, yellow in the middle and bluish green at the bottom. A photo of Led Zepplin appears at the top center. April 24, 1969 is the only date listed. This sold for under $10.00 and was not represented as an original item, but it is only a matter of time until someone either unknowingly or deliberately offers to sell one of these as an original dating from the time of the concert.

Caveat Emptor and all that stuff. Look out for this one.

 

Under BG-173 change posters to read:
BG-173-OP-1   This poster was printed lawfully only once.
BG-173-PP-2   In 2008 a pirate/bootleg of this poster was printed, probably in Australia, and sold on ebay. This poster was printed digitally on semi-gloss stock unlike the lawful original
                         which was printed on glossy, coated stock as were almost all Bill Graham Presents lawful original posters from BG-150 to BG-286. This bootleg can be distinguished by
                         the fact that the white areas are not pure white but are filled with small, colored dots. 20 47/64" x 13 47/64"


Under BG-175 change "BG-175-PC-B" to "BG-175-PC-A."

Under BG-176 change BG-176 & 177-PC-B to read
     This double postcard has a calendar of other Bill Graham events on the
    reverse of the BG-177 side and a bulk rate permit on the reverse of the
    BG-176 side.  7” x 9 15/64”

Under BG-177 change "BG-177-PC-B" to BG-177-PC-A."

Under BG-179 change "BG-179-PB-B" to "BG-179-PC-A."

Change BG-180-OP-1 and BG-180-RP-2 to read
 

"BG-180-OP-1 The original poster printed before the concert has a faint, vertical, straight blue line 3/4" long in the right margin beginning 2" down from the top of the poster.     14 1/32" x 22 1/32"

BG-180-RP-2 On the reprint the faint blue line described under the original has been removed. 14" x 22"

Under BG-185 change "BG-185-PC-B" to "BG-185-PC.A."

After BG-186-RP-2 add
BG-186-RP-3    In 2006 the new owner of the Bill Graham Presents copyrights, Wolfgang’s
    Vault, reprinted six of the numbered Fillmore/Fillmore West posters. Each was
    printed in two different sizes on two different stocks. All bear the credit
    “Wolfgang’s Vault” in the lower right corner. This item is the smaller version on uncoated index. 13 7/8” x 21 45/64”
BG-186-RP-4      This item is the larger version on glossy, coated stock.  21 1/64” x 32 1/2”

After BG-186-RP-4 add:
BG-186-PP-5     In 2011 a pirate selling on www.amazon.com bootlegged this poster. It is on
    slick, glossy stock and has a white border not on the original or either lawful
    reprint. The distinguishing characteristic is size which is smaller than lawful
    copies. 11 31/32” x 18 1/64”


After BG-186-PC-C add:
* Sometime in the 1990’s a mid-west  (Indiana?) pirate created a poster for this event. The
image bears no resemblance to the image created by Randy Tuten.  It is a photograph of the
Doors on a red background with gold lettering. “TRIBUNE SHOWPRINT, INC.,  EARL
PARK, IN” appears in the lower margin at left.

Change posters under BG-193 to read:
BG-193-OP-1    This poster was printed only once, but there are two variants. The more common variant has a red ticker outlets strip.  It should be noted that the 
          background color of this poster varies substantially. 12 55/64” x 21 11/64”
BG-193-OP-2     In 2006 it was noted that a small but not inconsequential number of this image
         have a brown ticket outlets strip. 12 53/64” x  21 11/64”

Change BG-193-PC-A and BG-193&194-PC-B to read
BG-193-PC-A    This postcard size item has a calendar of other Bill Graham events on the reverse. All known copies of BG-193-PC-A had the ticket outlets strip cut off by the printer due to a stripping error which caused the ticket outlets strip on the five upper cards on the proofsheet to overlap the top of the cards below. Although the lower three cards on the proofsheet could have been cut to include the ticket outlets strip, apparently a decision was made to cut them all off.
    4 19/64” x 6 29/32”
BG-193 &     This double postcard has a bulk rate permit on the reverse of the BG-193
    194-PC-B    side and a calendar of other Bill Graham events on the reverse of the BG-194 side. All known copies of BG-193&194-PC-B had both ticket outlets strips cut off due to the same sort of stripping error mentioned under BG-193-PC-A
    6 57/64” x 9 3/8”

After BG-194-RP-2 add:
BG-194-RP-3  In 2010 the current holder of the copyrights on these Bill Graham posters, Wolfgang's Vault, issued a large size reprint of this image on glossy, coated stock. The notation
                        "Wolfgang's Vault" appears in black in the lower right corner. 23 1/16" x 37 1/64"
Change BG-194-PC-A to read:
BG-194-PC-A  This postcard size item has a calendar of other Bill Graham events on the reverse (See BG-193 for double.). This more common version of this card had the ticket outlets strip cut off. 4 5/8" x 7 3/64"
After BG-194-PC-A add
BG-194-PC-B  For unknown reasons some BG-194 cards were dustrubuted with the ticket outlets strip attached. This version of the BG-194 card included the ticket outlets strip. 4 5/8" x 7 1/32"

Under BG-196 add
BG-196-PC-B    Some copies of this postcard sized item are blank backed.

After BG-199-RP-2 add

BG-199-RP-3   In late 2006 the new owner of the Bill Graham Presents copyrights, Wolfgang’s Vault, reprinted four of the numbered Fillmore/Fillmore West
posters.
 Each was printed in two different sizes. All bear the credit “Wolfgang’s Vault” in the lower right corner. This is the smaller version on glossy, coated stock. 14” x 22 25/64”

BG-199-RP-4    This item is the larger version also on glossy, coated stock. 20 25/64” x 32 1/2”  

 

Under BG-201 number change the location to read "Under the 'S' in 'Sunday'"

Change BG-201 posters to read
If there is one poster which has plagued me over the years, it is BG-201. Those of us who study
these posters have known for a long time that there were two authorized printings, one before
the show and one in 1974, but I have been unwilling to use some of the more
popular distinguishing characteristics for specific reasons. I have not wanted to use the fact that
the reprint is longer than the original because that might encourage an unscrupulous person to
take reprints and cut them down to the length of the original. This is a policy I have followed
throughout this guide. I have not used length or width as a deciding factor if the reprint is larger
than the original. Also commonly used is a small black smudge in the inner silver border lo-
cated between 7/16” and 1/2” right and above the “M” in “PM” in the black strip at the bottom,
but smudges like that have a tendency to be on some posters and not others in a run. Recently I have seen originals which did not have this smudge. Lately I have been inclined toward using what Jacaeber Kastor describes as stripping flaws along the right edge next to the last “S” in “Stones,” but I was afraid that if this poster was printed two up, that is two posters side by side on the same sheet, that this might only appear on the poster on one side and not the other. I note in passing that it has long been agreed that the reprint of BG-201 was printed two up. Unfortunately Levon Mosgofian, the printer of these posters and in the 1960s and 1970s  the owner of the dba Tea Lautrec Litho, is long deceased, and it was not possible to ask him how this poster was printed.
To my delight and amazement in 2004 several pieces of good fortune combined to answer all my concerns about this poster, and to my satisfaction I can give my readers a reliable distinguishing characteristic for the original and reprints of BG-201. First I was able to examine the original artwork, and second I saw several miscut originals. These were cut too far out along the left edge so that whatever was next to them on the proofsheet became apparent. To my surprise, it was not another poster. It was the edges of several cards. This means that there is no side to side variant original the way there is a side to side variant reprint.
It became apparent from the original artwork (the ink drawing by the artist, Randy Tuten, with the actual photograph by Ron Raffaelli attached) that there were not two black borders but three. One of these touches the photograph so it is not readily visible, but the fact that it is there can be determined by looking under the “S” in “Presents” at the top where it is apparent in the light area at the top of the photograph. It also can be seen at the bottom 2 1/4” in from the left edge, but it is much more faint there because that light area is much darker than the light area at the top. This inner black border actually goes all the way around the photograph.  Because it became clear from the miscut originals that there was no possibility of a variant original, it was obvious that Mr. Kastor had been right all along about the flaw next to the “S“ in “STONES.” This sloppiness was cleaned up on the reprints so this does not appear on them. There is a finer and shorter similar series of white flaws along the bottom of the photograph near the right edge. These do not appear on the BG-202 poster, and they do not appear on the cards.

BG-201-OP-1  Inside the third and innermost black border of the original in the right margin next to the second “S” in “STONES” is a vertical series of very narrow                         white flaws extending from the upper right corner down at least 4”. There is a much finer series of white flaws along the bottom edge of the                                     photograph inside the third and innermost black border beginning at the lower right corner of the photograph and extending in at least 2”.
                       14” x 21 29/32”
BG-201-RP-2 Neither reprint has the white flaw described under BG-201-OP-1. This poster has a 1/32” wide and 1/4” long horizontal black indentation into the                           bottom silver border (above the second show information) at the very left edge, that is, the top edge of the black bottom strip is not straight at the left                         edge but moves up 1/32” for a distance of about 1/4’. This should not be mistaken for a very short 1/32” wide but less than 1/16” long rise the                                 occurs in the same place on some originals. If there is any confusion, it should be resolved by reference to the white flaw described under                                         BG-201-RP-1. 14” x 22 1/32”
BG-201-RP-3 This reprint does not have the black indentation described under BG-201-RP-2.The top edge of the black bottom strip with the second show                                 information is straight all the way across.
BG-201-PP-4  A pirate edition of this poster was printed in 1986. This item may be distinguished from the originals and the legitimate reprints by at least two                                 factors. The pirate is on stock .0125" thick. Both legitimate printings are on stock less than .0100" thick. On both authorized editions three faint                                 white lines extend down 1 1/2" below "ll" in "Rolling." These do not appear on the pirate. 14 3/64" x 22 1/16"

After BG-201-PP-4 add:
BG-201-RP-5  In 2014 Wolfgangs's Vault reprinted this poster on slick, glossy stock in a press run of 500. A "Wolfgang's Vault" credit was added in the lower right corner. 20 25/64" x 31 3/4"


Under BG-202 act change "Stone" to Stones."

Change BG-205 posters to read:
 
BG-205-OP-1 This poster was printed twice. The original has a c. 1/8" long horizontal black line midway between the top and the bottom of the right margin. This is a remnant of
of a printer's bull's-eye not fully removed in trimming.
BG-205-RP-2 The reprint does not have the printer's bull's-eye remnant described under BG-205-OP-1.

Change BG-210-OP-1 to read,

"On the original there is a c. 1/64" dot c. 5/32" above the top of the edge of the brown image c. 5/16" left of the right edge of the brown image. This is in the top white         margin slightly left of the right edge of the image."
Change BG-210-RP-2 to read, "On the reprint the dot described under BG-210-OP-1 has been
deleted"

Change BG-211-OP-1 and BG-211-RP-2 to read

 BG-211-OP-1 The original poster has a small 1/32" red dot in the top margin about 1/2" to the left of the top right corner of the image. 14" x 22 3/64"

BG-211-RP-2 On the reprint the dot described under BG-211-OP-1 has been removed.    14" x 22 3/64"

Under BG-214 change the posters to read:
BG-214-OP-1    In 2005 two reliable distinctions were found between the original and the
    reprint of BG-214. The original has several small blue spots in the outer white
    top margin just to the right of the left outer black border. It does not have the
    small white nick in the “V” in “Steve” described under BG-214-RP-2.
    13 15/16” x 21 61/64”
BG-214-RP-2    The reprint does not have the blue spots described under BG-214-OP-1. It has
    a small white nick in the left side of the left leg of the “V” in “Steve”
    29/32” down from the top of the “V.” This white nick varies in size from .01” to .003,” but it was on every one of the large number of copies examined.
    14” x 22 1/64”

Under BG-216 change the dimensions of BG-216-RP-2 to 13 63/64” x 22 1/32”

After BG-216-RP-2 add
BG-216-RP-3 In 2013 the current copyright holder, Wolfgang's Vault, reprinted this poster with a Wolfgang's Vault credit in the lower right corner. 22 9/16" x 36"

Under BG-216 change the dimensions of BG-216-PC-A to 4 39/64” x 7 5/32”


Under BG-217 change the date to read "2/12-15/70."

After BG-219-PC-A add:

After BG-222-OP-2 add:
BG-222-RP-3  In 2010 the current holder of the copyrights on these Bill Graham posters, Wolfgang's Vault, issued a large size reprint of the BG-222-OP-2 image on glossy, coated stock. The
                        notation "Wolfgang's Vault" appears in white in the lower right corner. 24 21/64" x 37 1/32"
Under BG-223 add:
BG-223-OPC-D  BG-223-OPC-D By 2011 I had seen enough copies of this card with the ticket outlets strip cut
     off to realize that these had been issued this way, probably as a result of a
     cutting mistake at Tea Lautrec Litho, to warrant a separate designation.
     4 39/64” x 6 15/16”

The descriptions for BG-223 ande BG-224 were reversed. Please read the description of BG-224 for BG-223 and vice versa.

Under BG-225 change acts from Family Fritz to Family and Fritz, two separate acts and add:
*Earlier editions of this guide listed the act as “Family Fritz,” one act. In 2005 it was pointed out to me that this was two acts; Family, which was an act featuring bassplayer  Rick Gretch who went on to play with Blind Faith, and Fritz, which was an act featuring Stevie Nicks and
Lindsey Buckingham.

After BG-227-RP-2 add:
BG-227-RP-3  
In 2008 the new owner of the Bill Graham  Presents copyrights,  Wolfgang's  Vault,  reprinted four  numbered Fillmore  posters.  All  bear the credit
                          "Wolfgang's Vault" in the lower right corner.  30 13/32" x  30 19/32"


After BG-230-OP-1 add:
BG-230-RP-2 In 2014 Wolfgang's Vault reprinted this poster on slick, glossy stock in a press run of 500. A"Wolfgang's Vault credit appears in the lower right corner. 20 13/32" x 31 29/64"

After BG-230A-OP-1 add:
BG-230A-PP-2  In 2011 a pirate selling on www.amazon.com bootlegged this poster. The stock
    used was slick and glossy. A white border not on the original was added. The
    distinguishing characteristic is size. 11 63/64” x 18” 



At the end of BG-232A-PC-A change the period to a comma and add:
"but the card was printed on at least two different paper stocks which took the blue ink differently. This variant is on stock which is .0095" thick and slightly more porous than BG-232A-PC-B. The blue tends to be lighter than the blue of BG-232A-PC-B because of the porosity of the paper.

BG-232A-PC-B This variant was printed on slightly smoother stock than BG-232A-PC-A. It is .0105" thick. It is not on coated stock similar to that used for Bill Graham Presents posters from number 150 to number 287. The blue tends to be a bit darker than the blue of BG-232A-PC-A."

Under BG-244 change "7/23-36" to "7/23-26."

At the end of the text for BG-245-OP-2 add:

Under BG-246 notes add that the temple is the Parthenon on the Acropolis of Athens, and the woman is Isadora Duncan. The original photograph is by Edward Steichen. Change "four" to "three."

Under BG-248, 249 and 251 change the number to read:

"247" appears incorrectly at the left above the ticket outlets strip on the card but not the poster. Leave the correct location the same on all three.
Under BG-270 Under date change "70" TO "7l" Both times.

Under BG-275-OP-1 add "lawfully" before "printed."
After BG-275-OP-1 add:
BG-275-PP-2   In 2009 Grant McKinnon of San Francisco Rock Posters showed me a pirate printing of this image. It was not a modern or recent pirate done digitally. It was done a long time ago and printed by offset lithography. This means that there probably are a substantial number of copies of this bootleg out there despite the fact that no one has noticed it before now.
It is printed on thin, uncoated paper very different from the glossy, coated stock used for most Bill Graham Presents posters in this period. On the original the image is a rich blue color. On the pirate it is mostly gray with only a hint of blue to it. 21 1/64" x 27 63/64"

After BG-279-OP-1 add:
BG-279-PP-2   In 2011 a pirate selling on www.amazon.com bootlegged this poster. The stock used was slick and glossy. A white border not on the original was added. The size is the
                         distinguishing characteristic. 12" x 18"

Under BG-287 add:
BG-287-PP-3     In 2004 several earlier pirates were pointed out to me. This and one of BG-140
    appear to have been done by the same printer. The are both on the same thick
    (.0110”) coarse and porous stock. The inking was done poorly, and the ink tends to rub off the paper. From the look and condition of the paper it appears
    that this pirate was done at least ten and probably more years ago, (before 1994). Colors are very dull compared to the bright colors of the originals.
    17 29/32” x 11 61/64”

After BG-287-PP-3 add
BG-287-RP-4  In 2013 the current copyright holder, Wolfgang's Vault, reprinted this poster with a Wolfgang's Vault credit in the lower right corner. 30 3/8" x 23 3/4"


Under BG-288 add:
BG-288-RP-3  In 2008 the new owner of the Bill Graham  Presents copyrights,  Wolfgang's  Vault,  reprinted four  numbered Fillmore  posters.  All  bear the credit
                          "Wolfgang's Vault" in the lower right corner. 20 13/32" x 30 15/16"

BG-288-PROG-A  In 2004 Jacaeber Kastor showed me a program for this show. It is printed
                               on newsprint, and it has the image of the poster in monochromic black with
                               a red border on the cover. It is 11 sheets long printed on both sides of each
                               sheet for a total of 22 printed pages. It measures 8 1/2” x 11.”

BG-289-RP-3  In late 2006 the new owner of the Bill Graham Presents copyrights, Wolfgang’s Vault, reprinted four of the numbered Fillmore/Fillmore West
posters.
 Each was printed in two different sizes. All bear the credit “Wolfgang’s Vault” in the lower right corner. This is the smaller version on uncoated  index stock. Both of the 2006 reprint BG-289 posters have the lower left edge as does BG-289-RP-2. 16 17/32” x 22 25/64”

BG-289-RP-4    This item is the larger version on glossy, coated stock. 24 1/64” x 32 17/32”  

 


Under BG-289 add:
BG-289-RPC-A In 2004 the new copyright holder who recently had purchased all the Bill Graham Presents copyrights began reprinting selected items. Among the first items printed at this time was a postcard of this image. A Wolfgangs Vault logo appears on the reverse.
    4 1/4” x 6”

Change "Was" to "Wes."

"Batman" essay

After the Batman essay add:

Bill Graham tickets

Under Bill Graham tickets change BG-109 to read
109 Th Fe 29 - Su Mar 3: strip blue
       Th 29: lavender, blue variant of same date with printed valid day
       Th 29: lavender, blue variant of same date with blank bottom strip
       Th 29: lavender variant of same date with printed valid day
       Th 29: lavender variant of same date with blank bottom strip
       Fr 1: yellow, blue with printed valid day
       Fr 1: yellow, blue with blank bottom strip
       Sa 2: red, yellow, lavender, purple with printed valid day
       Sa 2: red, yellow, lavender, purple with blank bottom strip
       Su 3: red, yellow, blue, lavender, purple (PC) with printed valid day
       Su 3: red, yellow, blue, lavender, purple (PC) with blank bottom strip

Under BG-285 delete:

add: Under Bill Graham Tickets under BG-285 add:
Th 17, Su 20 - one ticket: red, blue, silver, rust, white
Under Bill Graham tickets BG-285 add

Fr 18: blue, red, silver, black

After BG-289-RP-2 add

BG-289-RP-3  In late 2006 the new owner of the Bill Graham Presents copyrights, Wolfgang’s Vault, reprinted four of the numbered Fillmore/Fillmore West
posters.
 Each was printed in two different sizes. All bear the credit “Wolfgang’s Vault” in the lower right corner. This is the smaller version on uncoated  indexstock. Both of the 2006 reprint BG-289 posters have the lower left edge as does BG-289-RP-2. 16 17/32” x 22 25/64”

BG-289-RP-4    This item is the larger version on glossy, coated stock. 24 1/64” x 32 17/32”  

 


Under Bill Graham Presents tickets after BG-286 add

287 Mo Jun28 Backstamped tickets used instead of tickets bearing BG-287 image.
                        Backstamped in black on back of BG-120. Backstamp reads
                       “VALID ONLY MON JUNE 28 FILLMORE WEST— 3.50”
       Tu Jun 29 Backstamped tickets used instead of tickets bearing BG-287 image.
                        Backstamped in red on back of BG-119. Backstamp reads
                        “VALID ONLY TUE JUNE 29 FILLMORE WEST— 3.50”
       We Jun 30 Backstamped tickets used instead of tickets bearing BG-287 image.
                        Backstamped in black on back of BG-150. Backstamp reads
                       “VALID ONLY WED JUNE 30 FILLMORE WEST— 3.50”
       Th Jul 1    Backstamped tickets used instead of tickets bearing BG-287 image.
                        Backstamped in black on back of BG-128. Backstamp reads
                       “VALID ONLY THUR JULY 1 FILLMORE WEST—3.50”
       Fr Jul 2     Backstamped tickets used instead of tickets bearing BG-287 image.
                        Backstamped in black on back of BG-80. Backstamp reads
                        “VALID ONLY FRI JULY 2 FILLMORE WEST— 3.50”
       Sa Jul 3     Backstamped tickets used instead of tickets bearing BG-287 image.
                         Backstamped in black or red on back of BG-90. Backstamp reads
                         “VALID ONLY SAT JULY 3 FILLMORE WEST— 3.50”
       Su Jul 4     Backstamped tickets used instead of tickets bearing BG-287 image.
                         Backstamped in black on back of BG-117. Backstamp reads
                         “VALID ONLY SUN JULY 4 FILLMORE WEST— 3.50”

Since the BG-287 image was created shortly after the concerts, neither image tickets nor postcards of this image
exist. That is why backstamped tickets were used. It is likely that both black and red backstamps exist of all the
BG-287 tickets. It also is likely that all the variants of the fronts of the specific tickets (all the different days) were used, that is, if a BG-117 ticket was used for Sunday July 4, it is likely that all the variants of BG-117 were used, not just one specific day.


Under Bill Graham Presents Tickets change BG-289 to read BG-289 this ticket was not an image ticket.




Russ Gibb/Grande Ballroom

Add the following at the end of the Grande Ballroom introduction
"In 2000 a new plague appeared to make life difficult for collectors of Grande Ballroom material. Someone began printing pirate reprints of newspaper ads for Grande concerts. These images bear considerable resemblance to those of legitimate Grande cards and posters, but usually the images are different in some way. What this means is that if you
find a "new" variant not listed in this book, especially if it is on thin paper and 8 1/2" x 11" or larger, it is more likely than not that the item is a pirate. While it is still possible new original material will turn up even after thirty years, it is not likely. Since these items are being sold very cheaply, the best thing to do is acquire a copy and send it to me for study so that I can make note of it in my Guide. I will pay for the postage both ways when I return it to you. In this way other collectors can be made aware of each of these pirates as it appears. I will include a note about each pirate under the genuine use of the image."
Under G/G-661007-RP-2 change "400" to "325."

Under G/G-661007 after G/G-661007-RP-2 add
 
G/G-661007-RP-3      The third printing is a mechanically printed edition. It
 is much closer in size to the original than the second, but the stock is .0125” thick which is much thinner than the original. The notations “c 1966, 1993, 2003 GARY
GRIMSHAW” and “Third edition under license to Levi’s R Vintage Clothing” appear in the bottom margin at the left. The artist also signed and numbered a limited number of
copies (297) of this edition. 14 1/64” x 19 31/64”

Under G/G-661007 after G/G-661007-RP-3 add
G/G-661007-RP-4      The fourth printing is a mechanically printed edition. The notation “Fourth  Edition  Art c 1966, 1993, 2003, 2006 Gary Grimshaw” appears in the
            lower left corner. 13 3/64” x 19 1/32”


Under G/G-661007 add:
G/G-661007-PHB-B   In 2013 a person who was a seller at Detroit area record shows began selling an oversized postcard version of this image based on the black and white only handbill.
                                    5 11/64" x 7 13/16"

Under G/G-661021 change the text to read:
G/G-661021-OP-1      This poster was printed only once.  No card or handbill is known to exist for this concert.  The image is based on the same photograph as Mouse  and Kelley used
                                     for FD-28. This photograph is not, as was previously thought, of a man photographed behind venetian blinds. Please see notes under FD-28.  17 5/8” x 22 1/2”


Between G/G-661104 And G/G-661118 Add:

 
G/G-661111
G/G-661111        Grande Ballroom
11/11&12/66       Hitch Hikers 
                  Southbound Freeway 
Gary Grimshaw     MC-5
Rob Tyner 

G/G-661111-OHB-A In 1998 a handbill for the weekend between G/G-661104 and G/G-661118 was discovered. This handbill was printed only once. No poster is known to exist for this event. 

Under G/G-661118 change handbills to read:
G/G-661118-OHB-A  This handbill was printed only once, but it was printed on at least two different paper stocks. This item is on thick, coarse off white stock. No poster or card is
                                     known to exist for this event. 8 17/32" x 14 7/64"
G/G-661118-OHB-B  This item is on thick, coarse light gray stock.

Under G/G-661209 change the text to read:
G/G-661209-OHB-A  This handbill was printed legitimately only once. No poster or card is known to exist for this event. The stock on which this handbill is printed does not fluoresce under
                                    black light. 8 33/64" x 1033/64"
G/G-661209-PHB-B   In 2013 it was learned that the same pirate who who created bootlegs of several other Grande handbills around 1990 also forged this one, not once but twice. In this case
                                    his copies are much more difficult to distinguish than are his other ones. The first one is on stock which fluoresces bright white under black light. This stock is semi gloss,
                                    and very little detail is lost from the genuine item. 8 17/32" x 10 31/32"
G/G-661209-PHB-C  The second forgery, apparently by the same pirate, is on stock which is matte. This stock fluoresces bluish gray under black light. Slightly more detail is lost than on
                                    G/G-661209-PHB-B.  8 1/2" x 10 31/32"
                                   

Under G/G-670129 add:
In 2006 a copy of what appears to be a handbill of this image was discovered. It was printed by a photocopy machine or a computer printer, not by offset lithography as would have been the case if it was an original. The written area on the right side of this item is very fuzzy and difficult to read, what one would expect of a copy shot off a poster. On the poster it is quite legible. I would appreciate any further information about this item.
The best word on this is a direct quote from Gary Grimshaw who created this image: “There were no Guerilla Lovefare flyers printed at the time, only the newsprint ad, because a big publicity-stunt "dope raid" was staged by the Detroit police right after the ad appeared, everyone was rounded up and the show never happened.  Out of dozens arrested only two were charged, and charges were dropped the next week, but it made for good headlines for a day.  I don't know anyone who has reprinted the art as a flyer.”    

Under G/G-670317 After G/G-670317-OHB-A Add: Under G/G-670421 After G/G-670421-PHB-B Add: Under G/G-670423 change G/G-670423-OHB-A to read: Add: Under G/G-670609 add (31) under the designation G/G-670609.

Under G/G-670609 under acts add "Eccentric"

Under G/G-670609 add
    G/G-670609-PHB-C   Another version of the same pirate exists on tan paper. 8 33/64” x 11”

Under G/G-670616-PHB-B change the entry to read “…white or very pale gray paper.”

Under G/G-670623-OHB-A change the entry to read

        “This handbill was printed in black ink on pale blue paper.  The black strip across the top extends to the edge of the paper…”


Under G/G-670623-PHB-B Add

“The black strip across the top of the paper does not extend to the
         edge of the paper. The edge of the paper is pale gray/lavender.”


Under G/G-670623 add

         G/G-670623-PHB-C Another version of the pirate exists on light blue paper. The black strip across the top does not extend to the edge of the paper. The edge of the paper is light blue.


Under G/G-670630 change "Grande Ballroom" to "Ford Auditorium."

Under G/G-670630-OHB-A change:

After "G/G-670630-OHB-A" Add: Under G/G-670714-PHB-B add “shades of” before “pale blue.”

Under G/G-670728 add:
G/G-670728-PP-1  In 2013 someone created a pirate poster of this image. It has tinges of light green not on the original handbill. 12 7/8" x 18 55/64"

After G/G-670728-OHB-A add:
G/G-670728-RPC-B  Around 2000 someone in the Michigan area  reprinted this image as a postcard on glossy stock. "Canon" and "DIRECT PRINT" appear on the back. 3 15/16" x 5 53/64"

Under G/G-670811-OHB-A Change to read "No original poster is known to exist..."

After G/G-670811 add
G/G-670811A         Grande Ballroom
8/11&12/67             Same as G/G-670811
Carl Lundgren
G/G-670811A-RP-1    In 2007 Carl Lundgren, one of the original Detroit psychedelic poster artists, created a poster with this image as a commemorative of this event.
                                    12 61/64" x 18 31/32"

Under G/G/670825 add:

G/G-670825-OHB-C     In 2003 I concluded that this handbill also was distributed
                                       with the outer border crudely trimmed off with a
            scissors. I have now seen eight copies of this handbill.
            Four of these had the outer border trimmed in this manner.
            Two of these belonged to people who had gotten the handbill at the time of the event and told me they had not trimmed it themselves. The four trimmed copies came from different sources. 6 3/8” x 9 7/8”

Change G/G-670827A-OHB-A to read:
G/G670827AOHBA    In the early 1990s before I added the Grande/Gibb material to this
                 this Guide, someone sent me a photocopy of this image and told me
                 it was a Grande handbill. In 2012 I discovered that this is incorrect.
                 This is an ad which appeared in “The Fifth Estate” Vol. 2 No. 10 (36)
                 Aug. 15-31, 1967. “The Fifth Estate” was a local Detroit area under-
                 ground newspaper in the late 1960s. While there are numerous ads
                 which appeared for the Grande Ballroom in local Detroit underground
                 newspapers, and some of them are artistically interesting and histor-
                 ically important, it is not the place of this Guide to list them. This
                 image appears here to clarify the facts about this image which
                 appeared in earlier editions of this Guide incorrectly identified as a
                 handbill.


<>Under G/G-670827B add
G/G-670827B-OHB-C    In 2005 a third variant of this handbill was discovered. It was printed on
                                        stock  even more coarse than G/G-670827B-OHB-B, stock similar to the
                                        stock of brown paper bags only somewhat lighter in color. This variant
                                        was printed in the same brown ink as G/G-670827B-OHB-A. This variant
                                        also has an ad for The Sun, a local Detroit area underground newspaper
                                        published by Gary Grimshaw and John Sinclair, on the back.
                                        8 33/64” x 11 1/64”

Under G/G-670922-OP-1 change dimensions to read 12 3/16" x 22 1/8"

Under G/G-670929-OP-1 change "only once" to "twice."

After G/G-670929-OP-1 add:

Under G/G-671013 add
G/G-671013-RP-3     The third edition has the notation, “Third edition c 1967, 1992, 2007   Gary Grimshaw” in the bottom margin. 11” x 18 31/32”

Under "G/G-671027-OPC-C" after "black" add "the same as G/G-671110-OPC-C"

After "G/G-671027-OPC-C" add:

Under G/G-671029 add
G/G-671029-RP-1   In 2005 Carl Lundgren issued a signed and numbered limited edition poster of this image. 25 11/64" x 16 3/4
Delete "No poster is known to exist for this event."
After G/G-671029-RPC-C add:
G/G-671029-PHB-D     In 2012 a pirate handbill of this image was discovered. It is almost
               twice  the size of the original card. It was very poorly printed on coarse,
               brown paper similar to paper bag paper. Much detail from the original
               was lost. The edges appear to have been perforated, so presumably it
               was torn from a larger sheet. The artist who created the image, Carl
               Lundgren, specifically said it did not date from the time of the
                               concert. 9 61/64” x 5 29/32”

After G/G-671029-PHB-D add:
G/G-671029-PHB-E  In 2013 someone who was a seller at Detroit area record shows began distributing a pirate version of this postcard. The distance from the left line border to the right line
                                   border on the original is 6 5/8." On the bootleg version this distance is 6 9/16." 6 57/64" x 3 49/64"


Under G/G-671103 add: "Irving Penn (Photographer)"

Under G/G-671110 add: "Victor Skrebneski (Photographer)"change "Skrebnewski" to "Skrebneski."
Under G/G-671110 add
G/G-671110-RP-3    In 2006 the artist, Carl Lundgren, authorized a second reprint of this image which is also signed and numbered. It also has a white border not
                                  on the original. The “R” to “N” distance on this version is  12 1/4”. 17 1/32” x 27 5/32”

Change G/G-671126-OHB-A to read:

After G/G-671126-PHB-B add: Under G/G-671208 artist is "Gary Grimshaw."

Under G/G-671208 add "Wilson Mower Pursuit" under the list of acts.

Under G/G-671208 before G/G-670812-OPC-A add:

Under G/G-671208 change OPC-B and OPC-C to read
G/G-671208-OPC-B     This card has a light blue "Grande Ballroom" and "Place stamp here"
                                  imprint reverse which identically matches the #9 back in the Grande
                                  backprints section.
G/G-671208-OPC-C     This card has a light blue "Grande Ballroom" and "Place stamp here" im-
                                  print reverse which is slightly different from the #9 back. See the last
                                  page of the Grande backprints section for details.

Under G/G-671221 add
G/G-671221-RP-2       The second edition adds the notation “Second Edition c 1967, 2007 Gary Grimshaw” in the bottom margin. 11 17/32” x 18 29/32”

Under G/G-671226 add:                                     
                                      In 2005 Carl Lundgren issued a signed and numbered limited edition
                                      poster of this image. A wide white border distinguishes it from the
                                      original poster. If the white border was cut off in an attempt to create a
                                      fraudulent “original,” it would be at least 3/16” under 13 3/16” wide or
                                      it would have some remnant of the white border. 17 9/64” x 27 25/32”

Under G/G-680112 add:
G/G-680112-RP-1 In 2007 Carl Lundgren issued a signed and numbered poster of this image.

Under G/G-680126 add:
G/G-680126-RP-1 In 2005 Carl Lundgren published a signed and numbered limited edition
            poster of this image

Under G/G-680209 add:
G/G-680209-RP-1     In 2008 Carl Lundgren issued a signed and numbered limited edition poster of this image.  17 1/6" x 25 21/32"

Under G/G-680216 add:
G/G-680216-RP-1      In 2005 Carl Lundgren issues a signed and numbered limited edition poster of this image. 17 9/64" x 27 1/32"
          Delete "No poster is known to exist for this event."

Under G/G-680223A-OPC-A delete "No poster is known to exist for this event."

Under G/G-680223A add:

Under G/G-680223A add
G/G-680223A-RP-3      In 2007 Gary Grimshaw printed an edition with the notation “Third Edition c 1968, 1991, 2007 Gary Grimshaw” in the bottom margin. 11 63/64” x 19 1/64”

After G/G-680223A-OPC-C add:
G/G-680223A-PPC-D    In 2012 a pirate printing postcard of this image appeared on ebay. The
                reverse  bears the credit “Printed in the E.E.C.” This refers to the
                European Economic Community.
G/G-680223A-PPC-E    In 2012 another pirate printing postcard of this image appeared on ebay
                a week after G/G-680223A-PPC-D sold. The reverse of this item bears
                the credit “Printed in England.” The seller of this item said he thought
                it dated from the 1980s.



Under G/G-680301 add
G/G-680301-RP-3    The third edition bears the notation “Third Edition c 1968, 1992, 2007 Gary Grimshaw” in the bottom margin. 11 63/64” x 18 61/64”

Under G/G-680303 add:
G/G-680308-RP-1       No poster was originally printed of this image at the time of the concerts.
             In 2007 Gary Grimshaw issued a poster of this image. The notation
             “Second Edition c 1968, 2007 Gary Grimshaw” appears in the bottom
             margin.  The postcard was the first edition. 10 63/64” x 19”
Under G/G-680303-OPC-A delete "No poster is known to exist for this event."

Under G/G-680322 eliminate G/G-680322-PHB-B
After G/G-680322 add:
G/G-680322A              State Fair Coliseum

   3/22&23/68              Eric Burdon and the Animals
                                    Grateful Dead
   Gary Grimshaw       Aere Apparent
                                   Apostles
                                   Jagged Edge
G/G-680322A-PHB-A    Sometime not long before 1992 a pirate handbill was printed based on
                a newspaper ad for this event. It was created by Gary Grimshaw as
                were a lot of the Russ Gibb related newspaper ads. It is black and red
                on a white background.  17” x 11 1/64”     

                        *     *     *


Under G/G-680407 add
G/G-680407-RP-3     The third edition bears the notation “Third Edition Art c 1968, 1992, 2007 Gary Grimshaw” in the bottom margin. 12 7/32” x 19”

Under G/G-680417 add
G/G-680417-PP-1       In 2013 a pirate/bootleg of this image was done as a small size poster. It
            was printed on glossy stock. Since it was based on a postcard, the image
            became somewhat fuzzy. The bootlegger decided to “improve” on Gary’s
            original artwork by making the word “Cream” yellow. A white border
            was added. 13" x 31/32”


Under G/G-680503 add
G/G-680503-RP-2    The third edition was mechanically printed and bears the notation “Third Edition c 1968, 1992, 2007 Gary Grimshaw” in the bottom margin, 12 3/64” x 18 31/32”

Under G/G-680511 add
G/G-680511-OP-1    .... "before the concert"
G/G-680511-RP-2   The second edition bears the notation "Second Edition c 1968, 2007 Gary Grimshaw" in the bottom margin. 11 63/64" x 18 61/64"

After G/G-680511-RP-2 add
G/G-680511A                           Cobo Hall
5/11/68                                      Same as G/G-680511
Carl Lundgren
G/G-680511A-RP-1     In 2007 Carl Lundgren, one of the original Detroit psychedelic poster artists, created a poster with this image as a commemorative of this event.
                                     17 3/64" x 23 57/64"


Under G/G-680607 add
G/G-680607-RP-2  In 2005 Gary Grimshaw authorized a reprint of this poster on glossy stock very different from the porous stock of the original.
                                10 33/64" x 17 3/8"
G/G-680607-RPC-C  In 2005 Gary Grimshaw authorized a reprint of this postcard on glossy stock very different from the porous stock of the original.
                                   Both the reprint postcard and the reprint poster were copied from an original poster and match the original poster. 3 39/64" x 5 29/64"

After G/G-680607 add
G/G-680607A                  Grande Ballroom
6/7-9/68                            Same as G/G-680607

Carl Lundgren
G/G-680607A-RP-1       In 2007 Carl Lundgren, one of the original Detroit psychedelic poster artists, created this image as a commemorative of this event. 12 29/32" x 18 29/32"

Under G/G-680614 add:
G/G-680614-PP-1   In 2013 a pirate/bootleg of this poster was printed in poster size on very thin, glossy stock. Since the source was a postcard and the size of the poster is fairly large, a great
                                deal of detail is lost, and the image is very fuzzy looking. The pirate chose to add insult to injury by not only bootlegging this poster but adding his own copyright notice,
                                "c Uneedyt" in the bottom left margin. The actual copyright holder for this image is the artist who created it, Gary Grimshaw. 23 31/32" x 35 27/32"
Under G/G-680726 add:
G/G-680726-RP-1     In 2005 Carl Lundgren issued a signed and numbered limited edition poster
                                   of this image. 16 47/64” x 24 13/64”
       Delete, "No poster is known to exist for this image."

Under G/G-680802 change (90) to (96)

Under G/G-680802 add:
In 2005 Carl Lundgren published a signed and numbered limited edition
            poster of this image

Under G/G-680809 add:
In 2005 Carl Lundgren published a signed and numbered limited edition
            poster of this image.

Change the text of G/G-680816 to read:
          G/G-681029-RP-1      In 2004 Carl Lundgren published a poster of this image.
                                              It was a limited edition of 100 which was signed and num-
                                              bered. No original printing poster exists for this image.
                                              16 25/32” x 27 7/64”

Under G/G-680823 add:
G-G-680823-RP-1 In 2007 Carl Lundgren issued a signed and numbered poster of this image.

Under G/G-680901 add
G/G-680901-RP-1       In 2004 Carl Lundgren published a poster of this image. It
                                    was a limited edition of 100 which was signed and numbered.
                                   No original printing of this image exists as a poster.
                                   14 53/64” x 24”

Under G/G-680906 change artist from “Morton” to “Chris Morton.

Under G/G-680913 artist add "Carl Lundgren."

Under G/G-680920 artist delete "Carl Lundgren."

<>Under G/G-680927 add
G/G-680927-RP-1      In 2005 Carl Lundgren issued a signed and numbered limited edition poster
                                    of this image. 17 5/64” x 25 37/64”
                   delete "No poster is known to exist for this image."


Under G/G-681004 artist add "Donnie Dope."
Under G/G-681004 add
G/G-681004-RP-1      In 2005 Carl Lundgren issued a signed and numbered limited edition poster
                                    of this image. 17 5/64” x 27 13/32”
                   delete   "No poster is known to exist for this image."

Under G/G-681011 add:
G/G-681011-RP-1   In 2008 Carl Lundgren issued a signed and numbered limited edition poster of this image. 17 3/64" x 28 5/16"

Under G/G-681015 artist add "Donnie Dope."
Under G/G-681015 add:
In 2005 Carl Lundgren published a signed and numbered limited edition
            poster of this image

Under G/G-681029 add:
G/G-681029-RP-1     In 2004 Carl Lundgren published a poster of this image.
                                   It was a limited edition of 100 which was signed and num-
                                   bered. No original printing poster exists for this image.
                                   17 5/32” x 27 19/64”
Under G/G-681029-OPC-B delete "No poster is known to exist for this event."

Under G/G-681030 add
G/G-681030-PP-3   In 2005 a British company listed as “NME” reproduced a number of posters from the psychedelic era, this one among them. They used the six
                                star version as a source. The poster was printed with a black outer border not present on the original or the reprint. The image is off center to
                                 the left. "NME PRESENTS VINTAGE ROCK AND ROLL POSTERS" appears in the lower right corner. A version of the guitar neck/dove
                                 Woodstock poster appears on the reverse. c. 9 11/16" x 11 7/8"
G/G-681030-PP-4   In 2006 it was discovered that in the mid 1970s a company named “CIRCUS” or something close to that published a book containing a number of psychedelic poster images.
                                These were perforated along one side so they could be removed easily from the book. This image is one
                                of the images that was in this book. It is based on the six star version. The number “51,” the page number, appears in the lower right corner. A
                                brown tone head and body profile appears on the reverse with the number “52” in the lower right corner. 10 1/64” x 14 27/32”
G/G-681030-PP-5   In 2013 someone selling on ebay offered a digitally printed pirate of this item based on the six star image. Viewed under magnification the tiny dots of digital printing are
                                visible. It is on glossy stock. The left and right borders are much wider than the top and bottom borders. 11 11/16" x 16 37/64"

After G/G-681030 add
Saturday November 30, 1968 Jimi Hendrix Experience at Cobo Hall (also Friday May 2, 1969 Jimi Hendrix Experience at Cobo Hall)
In 2007 Hal Leonard published a book entitled Road Work: Rock & Roll Turned Inside Out by Tom Wright. Wright was a long time denizen of the Detroit rock scene and a major photographer of the Grande era. He worked for Russ Gibb among others and was there at the Grande in its late 1960s heyday. Anyone seriously interested in the Grande ought to read this book.
In the text Wright mentions a concert Russ Gibb put on with the Jimi Hendrix Experience at Cobo Hall. Two different online chronologies of Jimi Hendrix Experience concerts show two appearances by the Jimi Hendrix Experience at Cobo Hall: Saturday November 30, 1968 and Friday May 2 1969.
In all the years I have researched the history of art for Russ Gibb and/or the Grande Ballroom, I had never encountered anyone who mentioned that either of these concerts was promoted by Russ Gibb, and I have never included any material from them in this Guide, but since Wright clearly was one of those at the heart of the Detroit scene, I could not discount this reference without further research. Accordingly I called Russ Gibb who has been most gracious and generous in making himself available to me for interviews and scholarly research. Russ told me clearly and specifically that he was not in any way involved with the promotion of either of these two concerts. He believed that Wright simply had  mixed up the Cobo Hall concerts with the Masonic Auditorium concert by the Jimi Hendrix Experience (2/28/68) and the CNE Coliseum Toronto concert by the Jimi Hendrix Experience the next night (2/24/68) which he, Russ Gibb, did promote.
This is in no way intended as a criticism of Wright’s excellent book, just as clarification that collectors of Grande/Gibb material do not have to add material from either of these two concerts to their collections.

 


Under G/G-681031 change artist from "Unknown" to "Carl Lundgren, Donnie Dope, Mardi Forrester."
Under G/G/681031 add:
G/G-681031-RP-1  In 2006 Carl Lundgren published a signed and numbered limited edition poster of this image. 17 1/64" x 27 3/8"

Under G/G-681101 added "Donnie Dope" under Artist.

Under G/G-681115 artist delete "Carl Lundgren."

Under G/G-681121 add

G/G-681121-RP-1 In 2001 Carl Lundgren published a hand pulled silkscreen of this image. It was a limited edition of 300 which was signed and numbered. No original printing of
                               this image exists as a poster. 17 23/32" x 29 63/64"
Under G/G-681121 add
          G/G-681121-OPC-E   In 2010 it was discovered that a small number (somewhere between several dozen and a hundred) of these cards have a small (1/8” to 1/4”) green dot located a bit to
                                              the left of the “J” in “Jefferson.” This dot is the result of a drop of green ink which got on the printing plate accidentally and moved on the plate slightly before being
                                              depleted.


After G/G-681122-OPC-A add:
G/G-681122-PP-1    In 2013 a pirate/bootlegger printed a poster size version of this image. and sold it on ebay. Since it was blown up from an original postcard, a lot of detail became fuzzy.
                                 The stock used was glossy on the printed side.  On the reverse the stock bears a “DUPONT”  “Commercial Gloss…”  credit. The white part of the image on the original card
                                 is off white on the pirate poster, and there is a white border outside the image. 12 63/64” x 18 61/64”
           

Under G/G-681220 add:
G/G-681220-RP-1   In 2009 Carl Lundgren issued a signed and numbered limited edition poster of this image. 17 1/64" x 25 9/32"

After G/G-690110-OPC-A add
G/G-690110-OPC-B  One copy of this card has a "Bulk Mail Permit No. 642" reverse.

Under G/G-690124A after G/G-690124A-OPC-A add: After G/G-690308 add
 
 
G/G-690308A  Union Ballroom
3/8/69 Procul Harum
Teagarden & Vanwinkle
Unknown
G/G-690308A-OHB-A This handbill was printed only once. It is for the same event as G/G-690308. There are two variants. This variant is in black ink on pale yellow paper.    5 1/2" x 8 17/32"

G/G-690308A-OHB-B This variant is in black ink on rose colored paper.


After G/G-690308 add
 
 
G/G-690328  Olympia Stadium
3/28/69 Doors
Frost
Sky
Linz

G/G-690328-PHB-A There was no original poster, postcard or handbill for this event as far as is currently known. In 2000 a pirate printed this handbill using a 1969 newspaper ad as a source. This copy was in black ink on thin pink stock. The notation "A Russ Gibb Production" appears at the lower right. 17" x 11 1/32"

Under G/G-690407B artist is "Carl Lundgren."

Under G/G-690411 add
artist: Gary Grimshaw

Between G/G-690418B And G/G-690425 Add:

Under G/G-690509 add
G/G-690509-RP-2    In 2003 The artist who created this poster, Carl Lundgren
      published a silkscreen limited edition of this image.
      17 63/64” x 28 63/64”

Under G/G-690509-OPC-A delete "No poster is known for this event."

Under G/G-690509 after G/G-690509-RPC-B add:

Under G/G-690516 under acts add "Cartoone" on all dates.

After G/G-690516-OPC-C add

G/G-690516-OPC-D This card has a blank reverse.
 Under G/G-690530 change the cards to read:
G/G-690530-OPC-A     This card size item was printed only once. There is a
                                       great deal of variation in the colors of this card. There
                                       are at least three variants to this card. This version has
                                        no black imprint at all.
G/G-690530-OPC-B     Some copies of G/G-690530-OPC-A were mechanically
                                       addressed and sent to people on the mailing list. These
                                       did not have a bulk mail permit reverse. These cards
                                       were blank backed. A postage meter was used.
G/G-690530-OPC-C     This variant has fine black lines dividing the rainbow
                                       colors around the 1/4” wide border, but it does not
                                       have fine black lines around the lettering or the elements
                                       of the drawings in the image. This is the most common
                                       version. 5 11/64” x 7 1/64”
G/G-690530-OPC-D     This variant has the fine black lines in the border, but
                                       it also has fine black lines around the lettering and the
                                       elements of the drawing in the image.


After G/G-690530 add:
 
G/G-690709  Grande Ballroom
7/9&11/69 Pentangle
Savage Grace
Skye
Billy Tyler
David & Roselyn
Unknown

G/G-690709-OHB-A This handbill was printed only once.

Between G/G-690806-OP-3 and G/G-690806-OPC-A insert:

Under G/G 690820 change artist's name from "Duffen" to "Duffer."

After G/G-690824 add

G/G-690831-OP-1    In 2001 a poster was discovered for this event. It was printed only once, but there are two                                    versions. This one is black and blue inks on yellow stock. 11 1/32” x 17 3/64”
G/G-690831-OP-2   This version of this poster is black and red inks on yellow stock. c. 11” x 17”

 
G/G-690831  Benedictine Stadium
8/31/69 Keef Hartley
Sky 
Lighthouse
Stooges
Friend and Lover
Wilson Mower Pursuit
Underground Wall
Brownsville Station
Red White and Blues Band
3rd Power
Wiktor

G/G-690831-OP-1 In 2001 a poster was discovered for this event. It was printed only once. c. 11" x 17"

After G/G-690831 add
                           G/G/690831A             Benedictine Stadium

                           8/31/69                  Same as G/G-690831

                           Unknown

G/G-690831A-OHB-A In 2003 a handbill was discovered for this event. It was
              printed only once. 8 1/2” x 10 15/16”


After 690831A add:
G/G-690912                                             Grande Ballroom
9/12&13/69                                              Turtles, T-Rex, Thomas Blood
Carl Lundgren,  Jerry Younkins
G/G-690912-RP-1       There were no posters, postcards or handbills created to promote these Russ Gibb concerts at the time of the event. In 2008 Carl Lundgren, one of the original
                                     Detroit psychedelic poster artists, used a collage by Jerry Younkins, also one of the original artists who collabotated on Detroit psychedelic posters in the 1960s,
                                     to create a poster with this image as a commemorative of this event. 17 1/32" x 23 25/32"

After G/G-691002 add
 
G/G-691013  Grande Ballroom
10/13/69 Allen Ginsberg
Stooges
Al Shamie

G/G-691013-OP-1 This number reserved for future use.

G/G-691013-OHB-A This handbill was printed only once. There have been reports that there also is a poster for this event.

Under G/G-691013 delete the entry "G/G-691013-OP-1 and under G/G-691013-OHB-A delete

"There have been reports that there also is a poster for this event."

After G/G-691013 add
 
 
G/G-691013A  Grande Ballroom
10/13/69 Allen Ginsberg
Up
Stooges
J & S Stoddard

G/G-691013A This poster was printed only once. c. 16" x 21"

After G/G-691031-OPC-B add

G/G-691031-PHB-C This image has two pirate handbills which were created in
2000 from underground newspaper ads. The image is the same,
but the colors have been changed. They are no longer the polychrome of the poster and the card , but they are now a monochromic black on orange paper. This
parallels the newspaper ad from which the pirate was made. There was no original handbill which was mono-chromic black on orange paper. The pirate handbills
come in two sizes. Both are on thin stock. This one has an orange border all around the image. It measures 8 33/64" x 11"

G/G-691031-PHB-D This pirate handbill from a newspaper ad also is in
black ink on thin orange stock. This one only has an orange border at the top and bottom. The image extends to the left and right sides. It measures
10 43/64" x 16 21/32"

After G/G-691031 add:
G/G-691031A                             Olympia Stadium (Black Magic Rock & Roll)
10/31/69                                      Same as G/G-691031 but adding Pink Floyd, Alice Cooper and Bonzo Dog Band
Carl Lundgren
G/G-691031A-RP-1          In 2008 Carl Lundgren, one of the original Detroit psychedelic poster artists, created a poster with this image as a commemorative of this event. He added
                                           several acts to the bill which did not appear at the original event. 17 17/64" x 23 51/64"
Under G/G-691229-OPC-A add: <>"Carl Lundgren who created G/G-690407B did not work on this design. It is a ripoff of his work.

Change G/G-700124B to read:
G/G700124BOP1         This poster was created for the same event as G/G700124A.  The images are different. 16 3/32” x 21 17/64”
G/G-700124B-RP-2     In 2004 www.idealposters.com in conjunction with Gary Grimshaw  reprinted this poster on slick, glossy stock. “www.idealposters.com”                                      appears in the lower left corner. 12 39/64” x 17 11/64”
G/G-700124B-RHB-A  At the same time that G/G-700124B-RP-2 was printed, a blank backed  handbill was printed on the same stock.  4” x 5 61/64”

Add new listing:
 
700124C G/G-700124C        Grande Ballroom

1/24/70 

Unknown artist 
Magdalene Sinclair 
(photographer) 


G/G-700124C-OP-1  This poster was printed only once. It is for some of the same events as G/G-700124A and G/G-700124B.

Under G/G-700326 add:
G/G-700326-PHB-B   In 2005 the postcard was pirated on thin, glossy stock. Printing was very poor
                                    with the red bleeding into the lettering. 6” x 9 3/64”
G/G-700326-OHB-C  The more common version of this handbill has all the main lettering from "Cincinnati" at the top to "Gardens" at the bottom in white drop out. In 2008 a variant
                                     was discovered which only has the lettering from "Amboy" to "Glass Wall" in white drop out. The rest is in red.

Under G/G-700613 Cincinnati Summer Pop Festival add:  G/G-700613-OHB-C  This handbill is in magenta ink on a white background.


Under Goose Lake Festival G/G-700809
Change G/G-700809-PP-2 to G/G-700809-PP-4 and G/G-700809-PP-3 to G/G-700809-PP-5

After G/G-700809-PP-5 add:
G/G-700809-PP-6      In 2011 two separate additional Goose Lake Festival pirate/bootleg
            posters appeared as one item on ebay. They were described as from the
            files of an out of business Michigan print shop. It turned out they were
            not two versions of one printing. They were an earlier pirate version
            which was used as the basis of a later pirate version. This was obvious
            because tears and abrasions on the first showed up as jagged lines
            printed on the second. Both were printed in black ink only. The first was
            printed on thin white paper. It is best distinguished by measuring the
            distance from the upper left corner of the “G” in “Goose” to the lower
            right corner of the “Y” in “Charity.” On this version the distance is
            27 27/32.”  18 1/32” x 23 29/32”
G/G-700809-PP-7      The second 2011 discovery was printed in black ink on off white stock.
            On this pirate/bootleg version the distance described under
            G/G-700809-PP-6 is 28 1/32”  18 1/32” x 23 29/32”
            Because the dimensions of these two versions are so close, it is possible
            both were printed by the same print shop.

After G/G-700809-PHB-B add:
G/G-700809-PHB-C In 2011 an ebay seller pirated this handbill. The new pirate is in black ink
                   on tan stock.  8 1/2” x 11”

After G/G-700809-PHB-C add:
G/G-700809-OHB-A-2     In 2014 an ebay seller offered and sold a handbill with the same image as  G/G-700809-OHB-A. This handbill was one sided and did not
                                          have the map on the back. It was printed in black ink on much thicker stock, about the thickness of a poster. This stock also was somewhat
                                          coarse. The provenance of this handbill goes back to a Detroit area record show in the early 1970s and had been in the possession of the
                                          seller since that time. This item was sold at this record show by the same person who was selling G/G-701231-PHB-B, another pirate/
                                          bootleg. The artist who created the Goose Lake image stated that he did not do this black on white version. It obviously is a pirate, a very
                                          early one, but a pirate none the less. 5 33/32” x 8 1/2”


After G/G-700809-TPC-14 add:
G/G-700809-TPC-15  This chip is brown with canes and hats.
G/G-700809-TPC-16  This chip is pale green/gray with hats and canes.
After G/G-700809-TPC-16 add
In 2012 someone selling on ebay offered several of G/G-700809-TPC-12 and
G/G-700809-TPC-13 on which a black circle had been drawn with some kind of marker. Most of these circles were drawn around the inner circle with the gold Goose Lake imprint. He said he was not sure, but he had been told that this was how people who attended the show had had their tickets canceled when they came in the gates. He acknowledged that it was possible that someone who had had these chips, which in 2011 were in an original cardboard box in which the tickets/chips had come, had a child who twenty years after the event marked them while playing, but since there is some possibility that this is how the tickets were canceled, I note this here so readers of this Guide will be aware of this possibility.
                   


After G/G-700809-TPC-16 add:
G/G-700809A                   Goose Lake Park   Jackson, Michigan
8/9-11/70                           Same acts as G/G-700809
Carl Lundgren
G/G-700809A-RP-1        In 2007 Carl Lundren, one of the original Detroit psychedelic poster artists, created a poster with this image as a commemorative of this event. 17" x 23 31/32"

After G/G-700809 add
 
G/G-701002  Grande Ballroom
10-2/70 No performers listed:
Rally for John Sinclair
J & S Stoddard

G/G-701002-OP-1 This poster was printed only once. No handbill or card is known for this event.
15 57/64" x 20 57/64"

After G/G-721021 add
G/G-721022                 Grande Ballroom
10/22/72                       Wishbone Ash     Jonathan Round
Bloomer
G/G-721022-OHB-A    This handbill was printed only once.  8 1/2" x 12 13/16"

Under G/G-701224C add

"This poster also exists without the Grande Ballroom imprint. The version without the Grande
imprint was sold to benefit the defense of John Sinclair. That version is not listed in this guide because it is not connected with the Grande Ballroom."

Under G/G-701231 change text to read:
G/G701231OPCA  After considerable study in 2006 I have been forced to conclude that some
            copies of this handbill are forgeries. Since these have been sold as originals,
            these can not be called pirates or bootlegs. The original is on white stock. It
            is much sharper than the forgery, but the best way to distinguish the forgery
            is to look at the left edge of the top of the castle turret.  On the original the
            roof of the turret has an eave which extends slightly to the left of the vertical
            left wall of the castle. See the upper illustration. 4 13/64”  x 7 13/64”
      G/G701231PHBB  The forgery appears on two different stocks. One is white.
       The forgery was printed with a different printing plate than the originsl. It
       is less clear than the original, but the easiest way of distinguishing the forgery
       is to look at the left edge of the roof of the turret. On the forgery this edge is
       straight without the roof eave extending out past the vertical left edge of the
       castle wall. See the lower illustration. 4 9/16” x 7 43/64”    
      G/G-701231-PHB-C   The forgery also appears on tan stock.                                                                   

After G/G-710805C add
                        G/G-710906                         Grande Ballroom
                        9/6/71                                   Brat
                                                                     Frut
                                                                     Harvey Khek
                       Unknown                              SRC
                                                                     Up

                      G/G-710906-OHB-A      In 2010 Greg Bosch discovered a handbill for this event. (The image of this handbill is hand done lettering with "PEOPLE'S BALLROOM"
                                                              in block letters at the top.) 8 1/2” x 11”

After G/G-720124 add
G/G-720319         Grande Ballroom
3/19/72                 Ted Nugent
                             Amboy Dukes
Unknown             Catfish
                             Aura

G/G-720319-OHB-A       In 2009 a copy of this handbill was discovered. It was printed only once. Someone sent me a photocopy of it. It was printed in black ink on white paper.
                                         Size is in the 8 1/2" x 11" range/
The image is a hand drawn picture of Ted Nugent with long hair and a mustache. The acts are listed below his picture, and "Grande Ballroom" appears in a large arc at the bottom.
The producer was Don Decker.

After G/G-720413 add:
G-G-720413A                                Grande Ballroom
            4/13/72                               Detroit featuring Mitch Ryder
                                                       Shadowfax
                                                       Thundercloud
            Unknown                           Frick
G-G-720413A-OHB-A   In 2010 a copy of this additional handbill for the Grande event on
                4/13/1972 was discovered. It described the Grande as the People’s
                Ballroom. This handbill was printed only once in pink ink on white
                stock.  8 1/2” x 11”

Under G/G-671027 STAMP HERE add "8 Black" and "9 Black."

In the bulk mail column after 690124A (72) add "53 Blue."
 

Neon Rose

Under NR-1 after NR-1-RP-2 add
NR-1-RP-3            In 2009 it was discovered that there was a third printing of this image. The best estimate is that this variant dates between NR-1-OP-1 and NR-1-RP-2, but since the
                              designation NR-1-RP-2 has long been the variant with the white spot completely blank, this new variant has to be assigned the designation NR-1-RP-3 despite the odd
                              chronology. Unlike the other two variants where the spot is either completely white or completely blue, on this variant the spot described under NR-1-RP-2 contains
                              two vertical blue lines about 1/64” wide and a bit less than a 1/4” long. Also immediately to the left if the white spot is another, third, vertical blue line, this one
                              over the orange background which is about 1/64” wide and 1/2” long. Small white areas are visible between the right two blue lines and to the right of the shortest one
                              which is farthest right. The artist, Victor Moscoso, and I examined this variant very carefully and determined that it was not printed with the same plate as the one used
                              for NR-1-OP-1 or the same plate as the one used for NR-1-RP-2. It was printed with an entirely different plate from either of those. Victor commented that several of
                              his early Neon Rose posters were printed three times, and there is no reason why this could not have been the case with NR-1. Since there would have been no reason
                              to burn a second blue plate on either of the two previously known printings, it is clear this is a separate printing, not a vari